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PH2 Joy Clark Naval Air Station, Bermuda....Aviation Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Eric Howard returns equipment to Wendy Maceyko, gym manager, after working out at the gymnasium. OFFICIAL U.S. NAVY PHOTO (RELEASED)

PH2 Joy Clark Naval Air Station, Bermuda....Aviation Electrician's Mat...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

AIRMAN 1ST Class Wendy Jenner, an F-15 Eagle aircraft crew chief, explains maintenance procedures to Japanese airmen during the joint Japanese Air Self Defense Force (JASDF) and U.S. Air Force exercise Cope North 84-1

AIRMAN 1ST Class Wendy Jenner, an F-15 Eagle aircraft crew chief, expl...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COPE NORTH 84-1 Base: Chitose Air Base Country: Japan (JPN) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT. Lee Schading Release Status: Releas... more

PETTY Officer 2nd Class Robert Howard holds his newborn son, Derek, as he and his wife, Wendy, enjoy a homecoming party at the Bethesda Naval Medical Center. The celebration is being held in honor of the crew members of the hospital ship USNS COMFORT (T-AH-20) who served in the Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm

PETTY Officer 2nd Class Robert Howard holds his newborn son, Derek, as...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: DESERT STORM Base: Bethesda State: Maryland (MD) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Mark Faram ... more

SENIOR AIRMAN Wendy Wildman, 1700th Air Refueling Squadron (Provisional), consults an air crew checklist aboard a KC-135Q Stratotanker aircraft while taking part in a refueling mission over Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield.

SENIOR AIRMAN Wendy Wildman, 1700th Air Refueling Squadron (Provisiona...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: DESERT SHIELD Country: Saudi Arabia(SAU) Scene Camera Operator: TECH. SGT. Hans Deffner Release Status: Released to Public Co... more

Official Portrait of Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Wendy B. Lawrence in

Official Portrait of Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Wendy B. Lawrence in

S92-44927 (8 Sept 1992) --- Astronaut Wendy B. Lawrence, mission specialist

Inaugural Parade. PO1 Wendy Seuss, flips through bus number location cards, to hand out to the next bus coming through the entry control at the staging area North Pentagon Parking Lot

Inaugural Parade. PO1 Wendy Seuss, flips through bus number location c...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Washington State: District Of Columbia (DC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Russ Pollenan Release Status: Re... more

U.S. Air Force MAJ. GEN. John P. Jumper (left), SENIOR Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, poses with U.S. Army CPL. Wendy A. Cornell (right) for an official photograph after she was awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal on Jan. 21, 1993.  OSD Package No. A07D-00113 (DOD PHOTO by Helene C. Stikkel) (Released)

U.S. Air Force MAJ. GEN. John P. Jumper (left), SENIOR Assistant to th...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pentagon State: District Of Columbia (DC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Helene C. Stikkel, CIV Release Status: ... more

Air Traffic Controlman Third Class (ACC) Wendy Parrett observes incoming and outgoing aircraft from her local control position in the air traffic control tower at Naval Air Station North Island

Air Traffic Controlman Third Class (ACC) Wendy Parrett observes incomi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: San Diego State: California (CA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Eric A. Clement Release Status: Released to ... more

Air Traffic Controlman Third Class (ACC) Wendy Parrett list a new aircraft arrival from her local control position in the air traffic control tower at Naval Air Station North Island

Air Traffic Controlman Third Class (ACC) Wendy Parrett list a new airc...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: San Diego State: California (CA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Eric A. Clement Release Status: Released to ... more

Photographers Mate First Class (PH1) Dave Hanselman, a videographer with Combat Camera Group, Atlantic, provides support to Broadcast Journalist Third Class (JO3) Wendy Hamme while she fires the M-60 machine gun from the prone position. This extra support ensures that the weapon will not ride up or out of control

Photographers Mate First Class (PH1) Dave Hanselman, a videographer wi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Eustis State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Terry Burnley Release Status: Released to Pu... more

Broadcast Journalist Third Class (JO3) Wendy Hamme improves her shooting skills on the .308 caliber M-14 rifle from the sitting position. Hamme qualified as a marksman on the rifle

Broadcast Journalist Third Class (JO3) Wendy Hamme improves her shooti...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Eustis State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Terry Burnley Release Status: Released to Pu... more

Photojournalist Third Class (JO3) Wendy Hamme prepares to fast rope out of a "hole" during a field training exercise with a Navy SEAL (SeaAirLand) tream at Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek

Photojournalist Third Class (JO3) Wendy Hamme prepares to fast rope ou...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Naval Amphib Base, Little Creek State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Erin Waters Release Stat... more

STS067-303-001 - STS-067 - PCG-TES, Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence works with experiment

STS067-303-001 - STS-067 - PCG-TES, Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: STS-67 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence works with the Protein Crystal Growth - Thermal Enclosure System (PCG-TES) middeck locker experiment. Subject ... more

STS067-303-002 - STS-067 - PCG-TES, Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence works with experiment

STS067-303-002 - STS-067 - PCG-TES, Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: STS-67 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence works with the Protein Crystal Growth - Thermal Enclosure System (PCG-TES) middeck locker experiment. Subject ... more

CAPT. Bonita Nolan and CAPT. Wendy McNiel from the 90th Missile Wing/Minuteman Crew, reset a tripped circuit breaker in the Missile Procedures Trainer. The Inspector General Team tested the ability of the base to respond to battle conditions, power outages, mobility deployments, aircraft and automobile accidents, hostage situations, bomb threats, armed robberies, terrorism, and communication problems

CAPT. Bonita Nolan and CAPT. Wendy McNiel from the 90th Missile Wing/M...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: Operational Readiness Inspection, 90th Space Wing, 11-25 Mar Base: Francis E. Warren Air Force Base State: Wyoming (WY) Count... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC800

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC808

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atl...

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC806

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space...

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC812

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Spa...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC805

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC798

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC809

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shu...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth dockin... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC804

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC811

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the ...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the six... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC799

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC801

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC803

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC807

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shutt...

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC802

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC810

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Spac...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth d... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC852

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC845

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, roll...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. It will be the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC840

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 3...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. It will be the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle p... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC838

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and other onlookers on KSC’s Runway 33 after landing of the successful nine-day mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Elene V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega. Not shown are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and returning astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC853

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and ot...

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and other onlookers on KSC’s Runway 33 after landing of the successful nine-day mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy o... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. The Vehicle Assembly Building is at left. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC851

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shu...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockre... more

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis shortly before landing was taken by a fish-eye camera lens from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The Vehicle Assembly Building is in the background at left. The Shuttle Training Aircraft can be seen in the distance, at center. Atlantis is wrapping up its nine-day STS-84 mission, which was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger is returning to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC855

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlant...

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis shortly before landing was taken by a fish-eye camera lens from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The Vehicle Assembly Building is in the b... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC843

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate-Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC’s Runway 33 at the conclusion of the STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft with astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell at the controls is flying in front of Atlantis. Cockrell is acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC844

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and ...

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate-Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC’s Runway 33 at the conclusion of the STS... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC850

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC839

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC842

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC841

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wolf confer, possibly about the Russian Space Station Mir, after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Lawrence was supposed to be the next U.S. astronaut slated for a long-duration stay aboard Mir, but was replaced by Wolf in late July. Unlike Lawrence, Wolf has undergone spacewalk training and fits in the Orlan spacesuit used by Russians on spacewalks. Lawrence will remain on the STS-86 crew, but will return to Earth at the conclusion of the planned 10-day mission. Wolf will take the place on Mir of astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived on the Russian space station during the STS-84 mission in May. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The mission is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis KSC-97PC1344

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wo...

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wolf confer, possibly about the Russian Space Station Mir, after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown De... more

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf and Scott Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf will transfer to the Mir for a long-duration stay, replacing Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth with the rest of the STS-86 crew. The mission is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis KSC-97PC1343

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shutt...

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From left, are Mission Specialists V... more

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, to the right of Hoggard; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Scott E. Parazynski. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to conduct a spacewalk primarily to retrieve four suitcase-sized environmental payloads from the exterior of the Mir docking module. Also during the mission, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1352

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armo...

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. G... more

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the way as the next Space Shuttle crew does a practice walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is in foreground at left. Directly behind the pilot and commander, from left, are Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Scott E. Parazynski. Bringing up the rear, from left, are Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, Wendy B. Lawrence and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-85, in May. The STS-86 launch aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1368

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the...

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the way as the next Space Shuttle crew does a practice walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A. The seven ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind them, the STS-86 crew poses for a photograph at Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left are Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1367

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind them, the STS-86 crew poses for a photograph at Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, and other crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis speak to media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From right, after Wetherbee, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence and David A. Wolf. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1354

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, w...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, and other crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis speak to media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A du... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are the three U.S. astronauts who will serve as mission specialists during the planned 10-day flight to the Russian Space Station Mir. Also serving as mission specialists will be Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1358

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Pa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Ter... more

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, David A. Wolf and Wendy B. Lawrence. Standing, from left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1359

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to t...

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Ti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind then, STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. From left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind then, STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. From ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, prepares to join his fellow crew members, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence and David A. Wolf, at far left, in a slidewire basket during emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A. The crew is at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-86 is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1373

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, prepares to join his fellow crew members, Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence and David A. Wo... more

STS-86 Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, at right; David A. Wolf; and Wendy B. Lawrence, at far left, take their seats inside the Space Shuttle Atlantis during a practice launch countdown called the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Seven crew members will fly to the Russian Space Station Mir for the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1374

STS-86 Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space...

STS-86 Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, at right; David A. Wolf; and Wendy B. Lawrence, at far left, take their seats inside the Space Shuttle Atlantis during a practice l... more

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press representatives and other onlookers after the astronauts’ arrival Monday at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynksi; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir for about four months. Liftoff of STS-86 aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1409

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press ...

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press representatives and other onlookers after the astronauts’ arrival Monday at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The other crew members, from lef... more

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (leaning into Parazynski); Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski and Lawrence had trained to live and work aboard the Russian station but were withdrawn from Mir training Parazynski because he was "too tall" to fit safely in the Russian Soyuz vehicle, and Lawrence because she is "too short" to fit in the Russian spacewalk suit. "Just right" Wolf is scheduled to become a Mir 24 crew member after the docking, to replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale for an extended stay aboard the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1413

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, famil...

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist ... more

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists (and their nicknames for this flight) are, from left, "too tall" Scott E. Parazynski, "just right" David A. Wolf and "too short" Wendy B. Lawrence. The two mission specialists representing foreign space agencies are Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, in foreground at right, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, in background at right. Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield are out of the frame. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. Parazynski and Lawrence were withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir Parazynski because he was too tall to fit safely in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, and Lawrence because she was too short to fit into a Russian spacewalk suit. The crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the planned 10-day mission KSC-97PC1428

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press represe...

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97pc1443

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. After a weather briefing, the astronauts will don their orange launch and entry suits and depart for Launch Pad 39A where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff at about 10:34 p.m. EDT, Sept. 25. The exact launch time may vary slightly based on calculations of the Russian Space Station Mir’s precise location in space at the time of liftoff. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Shuttle with the Mir. Wolf is scheduled to become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis after more than four months on the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1419

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew membe...

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; P... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1444

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a "thumbs up" to show she’s ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrence’s second spaceflight. She and the six other crew members will depart shortly from the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A, where Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Lawrence was given the nickname "too short," as shown on her orange spacesuit, because she was withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir when it was determined that she was too short to fit into the Russian spacewalk suit. Lawrence remains a member of the STS-86 crew, but fellow Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will take her place for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station KSC-97PC1425

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wen...

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a "thumbs up" to show she’s ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrence’s second s... more

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at center facing camera, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of white room closeout crew member Jim Davis, a NASA quality assurance specialist KSC-97PC1439

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at center facing camera,...

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at center facing camera, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assis... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1429

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they prepare to board the astronaut van, at right, after departing from the Operations and Checkout Building. Leading the way are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, at left, and Commander James D. Wetherbee. Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, at left, and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency are directly behind them, followed by Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, at center. Bringing up the rear are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. The seven-member crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a planned 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. He will replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew KSC-97PC1427

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representativ...

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they prepare to board the astronaut van, at right, after departing from the Operations and Check... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1430

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1442

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1434

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1445

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1433

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1431

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) can be seen in the background. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1504

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1505

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1495

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Station before flying back to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left, are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, Mission Specialist and recent Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Foale, who was on the Russian Space Station Mir since mid-May, returned to Earth aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis at the Oct. 6 KSC landing of Mission STS-86. He was replaced on the Mir by STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, who is scheduled to remain there until mid-January KSC-97PC1508

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Stri...

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Station before flying back to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left, are Mission ... more

Technicians observe the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it was removed from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery KSC-146fr3

Technicians observe the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it w...

Technicians observe the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it was removed from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January... more

A technician observes the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it was removed from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery KSC-147fr11

A technician observes the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it...

A technician observes the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) after it was removed from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in Janua... more

Technicians assist in moving the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery KSC-143fr8

Technicians assist in moving the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) f...

Technicians assist in moving the alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) from its protective shipping case in KSC’s Multi Payload Processing Facility (MPPF). The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is sche... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC’s MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Environmental Transportation System. The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery KSC-98pc375

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC’s MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Envir... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC’s MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Environmental Transportation System. The STS-91 payload arrived at KSC in January and is scheduled to be flown on the 9th and final Mir docking mission, scheduled for launch in May. The objectives of the AMS-1 investigation are to search for anti-matter and dark matter in space and to study astrophysics. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. After docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will join the STS-91 crew and return to Earth aboard Discovery KSC-98pc376

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The alpha-magnetic spectrometer (AMS-1) is lifted in KSC’s MultiPayload Processing Facility in preparation for a move to the Space Station Processing Facility via the Payload Envir... more

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98dc551

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch...

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super light... more

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious "dark matter" that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc587

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectr...

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc570

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the f... more

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98dc550

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch...

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1 where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super light... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery is silhouetted against the early morning sky as it is makes its 3.4 mile trek atop a crawler/transporter to Launch Complex 39A from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). There, in high bay 1, Discovery was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc568

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery is silhouetted a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery is silhouetted against the early morning sky as it is makes its 3.4 mile trek atop a crawler/transporter to Launch Complex 39A from the Vehicle Assembly Bui... more

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1, where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. This unusual image was taken from the 95-foot level of the pad as the Orbiter Access Arm supporting the white room (arm on right) and the External Tank Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm were moved into place on the orbiter and its stack. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98dc552

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch...

Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1, where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super ligh... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1, where it was mated to the first Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank/solid rocket booster stack. The Orbiter Access Arm, with the white room located at its outer end, is being positioned into place on the orbiter. This white room provides personnel entry into the orbiter while it is on the pad. Discovery will be launched on mission STS-91, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. This will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, but the first Mir docking for Discovery. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc569

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery sits atop a mobile launcher platform at Launch Complex 39A after its move this morning from Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 1, where it was mated to the ... more

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin, arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Ryumin is a veteran of three space flights and has logged 362 days in space. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc581

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ry...

STS-91 Mission Specialist and Russian cosmonaut Valery Victorovitch Ryumin, arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demo... more

STS-91 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (Cdr., USN) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. She is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Lawrence is making her third space flight and her second trip to Mir. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc583

STS-91 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (Cdr., USN) arrives at Ken...

STS-91 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (Cdr., USN) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. She is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCD... more

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Chang-Diaz is making his sixth space flight. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc585

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., arrives at Kenne...

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT),... more

STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. She is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Kavandi is making her first space flight. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc584

STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D., arrives at Kenned...

STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D., arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. She is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT),... more

The STS-91 flight crew poses for a crew portrait after arriving at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jets. Their arrival was delayed by severe thunderstorm activity in the area. From left to right, they are Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi, Ph.D., and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency; Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D. They are here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc586

The STS-91 flight crew poses for a crew portrait after arriving at Ken...

The STS-91 flight crew poses for a crew portrait after arriving at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jets. Their arrival was delayed by severe thunderstorm activity in the area. From l... more

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (Col., USAF) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Precourt is making his fourth space flight and third trip to Mir. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc580

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (Col., USAF) arrives at K...

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (Col., USAF) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TC... more

STS-91 Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie (Cdr., USN) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. The STS-91 launch is targeted for June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will conclude Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. Although it will be the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, it will be the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery. Gorie is making his first space flight. The STS-91 mission will also be the first flight for the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Mission Commander Charles Precourt and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living aboard Mir since January 25, 1998 KSC-98pc582

STS-91 Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie (Cdr., USN) arrives at Kennedy S...

STS-91 Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie (Cdr., USN) arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet. He is here to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a d... more