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Topic: thermal

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The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</a> is safely placed on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0103

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</...

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</a> is safely placed on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science in... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check the movement of the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> as it is carried to the workstand at right. The circular object facing forward on the spacecraft is a high-gain antenna. On the right side is the rectangular solar array assembly. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0100

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check the movement of the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> as it is carried to the workstand at right. The ... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> to a workstand (left). The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0099

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> to a workstand (left). The spacecraft carries three science... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>as it is lowered to a workstand. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0101

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>as it is lowered to a workstand. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carr... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>is lifted from a platform by an overhead crane while workers help guide it. The Odyssey is being moved to a workstand in the SAEF-2. The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0098

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a hr...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>is lifted from a platform by an overhead crane while workers help guide it. The... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers oversee removal of the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0121

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers overse...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers oversee removal of the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of th... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter is moved toward a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0123

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar arra...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter is moved toward a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and al... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a close look at the back side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0160

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a close look at the back side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science inst... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter onto a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0124

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter onto a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraf... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a visual check of the front side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0159

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a visual check of the front side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science i... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help guide the solar array just removed from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter toward a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0122

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help gu...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help guide the solar array just removed from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter toward a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other compon... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open the solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, allowing inspection of the panels and giving them access to other components. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0158

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open th...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open the solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, allowing inspection of the panels and giving them access to other components. The M... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach an overhead crane to the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to move the component to a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0120

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach an overhead crane to the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to move the component to a workstand. This will give workers access t... more

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter pose in front of the spacecraft in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0195

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectr...

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter pose in front of the spacecraft in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; ... more

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II) .; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0188

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is in...

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II) .; The orbiter will carry three scien... more

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0192

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be ins...

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).The orbiter will carry three science ins... more

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0193

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be i...

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers attach a crane to the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); to move it into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter.; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0190

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers attach a crane to the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); to move it into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter.; The orbiter will... more

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is moved to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0189

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is move...

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is moved to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II).; The orbiter will carry th... more

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0194

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Ma...

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the ... more

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0191

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to...

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three sc... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0264

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0258

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morpholog... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help put the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) in its place on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0262

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help put the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) in its place on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of ... more

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0259

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility ...

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralo... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead crane lifts and moves the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) toward the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0260

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead c...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead crane lifts and moves the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) toward the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and m... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0263

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of ... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers check the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter (background). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0257

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers check the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter (background). THEMIS will map the m... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), left, is moved toward the Mars Odyssey Orbiter, at right. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0261

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), left, is moved toward the Mars Odyssey Orbiter, at right. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morph... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atlantis in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., caused the moisture problem. The tiles are part of the Thermal Protection System used on orbiters for extreme temperatures encountered during landing KSC01padig215

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atlantis in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Fo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atlantis in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., caused the moisture problem. The tiles are part of the Thermal Protection System used on orbiters for extreme temperatures encountered during landing KSC01padig216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Banks of lights dry tiles on orbiter Atlantis in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Fo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker points to some of the tiles on orbiter Atlantis that are being dried by clusters of 200-300 watt heat lamps. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., caused a moisture problem. The tiles are part of the Thermal Protection System used on orbiters for extreme temperatures encountered during landing. Engineers are evaluating the current procedures to assure the tiles are in a safe and flight-ready condition KSC-01pp1023

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a wo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker points to some of the tiles on orbiter Atlantis that are being dried by clusters of 200-300 watt heat lamps. Significant rainstorms dur... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker points to some of the tiles on orbiter Atlantis that are being dried by clusters of 200-300 watt heat lamps. Significant rainstorms during the orbiter’s turnaround for a ferry flight home from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., caused a moisture problem. The tiles are part of the Thermal Protection System used on orbiters for extreme temperatures encountered during landing. Engineers are evaluating the current procedures to assure the tiles are in a safe and flight-ready condition KSC-01PP1024

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a wo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, a worker points to some of the tiles on orbiter Atlantis that are being dried by clusters of 200-300 watt heat lamps. Significant rainstorms dur... more

Thermal Electric Energy Conversion Module Cross reference to camera file: 45548446 GRC-2005-C-01403

Thermal Electric Energy Conversion Module Cross reference to camera fi...

Thermal Electric Energy Conversion Module Cross reference to camera file: 45548446

STS109-719-047 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-047 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Dark view of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) as he installs a thermal cover on Bay 5 of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in prep... more

STS109-719-049 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-049 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Overexposed view of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) and Mission Specialist Michael Massimino - standing on a foot restraint on t... more

STS109-719-044 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-044 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) as he installs a thermal cover on Bay 5 of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in preparati... more

STS109-719-045 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-045 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) as he installs a thermal cover on Bay 5 of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in preparati... more

STS109-719-043 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-043 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) as he installs a thermal cover on Bay 5 of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in preparati... more

STS109-719-048 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-048 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Overexposed view of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) and Mission Specialist Michael Massimino - standing on a foot restraint on t... more

STS109-719-046 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

STS109-719-046 - STS-109 - EVA 2 - Thermal cover installation

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of STS-109 mission specialist James Newman (free floating) as he installs a thermal cover on Bay 5 of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in preparati... more

Channel at Night in Thermal Infrared

Channel at Night in Thermal Infrared

This nighttime thermal infrared image, taken by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, shows differences in temperature that are due to differences in the abundance of rocks, sand and dust on the surface. NASA/JPL/Arizo... more

Global Map of Thermal Neutrons

Global Map of Thermal Neutrons

Observations by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in low energy, or thermal, neutrons. Thermal neutrons are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen and the presence of carbon dioxide, in thi... more

Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons

Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons

Observations by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft show views of the polar regions of Mars in thermal neutrons top and epithermal neutrons bottom. In these maps, deep blue indicates a low amount of neutrons and red i... more

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS  - (STS113-S-001 September 2002) -- This is the crew patch for the STS-113 mission, which will be the 11th American (11A) assembly flight to the International Space Station (ISS).  The primary mission will be to take the Expedition Six crew to the ISS and return the Expedition Five crew to Earth.  STS-113 will be the first flight in the assembly sequence to install a major component in addition to performing a crew exchange.  The Port 1 Integrated Truss Assembly (P1) will be the first truss segment on the left side of the ISS.  P1 will provide an additinal three External Thermal Control System radiators, adding to the three radiators on the Starboard 1 (S1) Integrated Truss Assembly.  The installation and outfitting of P1 will require three extravehicular activities (spacewalks) as well as coordination between the Shuttle Robotic Manipulator System and the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System.  The patch depicts the Space Shuttle Endeavour docked to the ISS during the installation of the P1 truss withthe gold astronaut symbol in the background.  The seven stars at the top left center of the patch are the seven brightest stars in the constellation Orion.  They represent the combined seven crew members (four Shuttle and three Expedition Six).  The three stars to the right of the astronaut symbol represent the returning Expedition Five crew members.  The Roman Numeral CXIII represents the mission number 113.  The NASA insignia design for Shuttle space flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize.  Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media.  When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, such will be publicly announced. KSC-02pd1160

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS - (STS113-S-001 September 2002) ...

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS - (STS113-S-001 September 2002) -- This is the crew patch for the STS-113 mission, which will be the 11th American (11A) assembly flight to the International Space Station ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) listens to Lee Zook (right) explaining use of the Dome Heat Shield blanket in front of them that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) listens to Lee Zook (right) explaining use of the Dome Heat Shield blanket in front of them that... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) greets Brenda Blackmon, a worker in the Thermal Protection System Facility.  O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0323

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) greets Brenda Blackmon, a worker in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS prod... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (third from left) talks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0330

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (third f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (third from left) talks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. O'Keefe is visiting the site to lea... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) meets workers. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0329

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) meets workers. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in pr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (right) visits the Thermal Protection System Facility.  At left is Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts.. KSC-03pd0332

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (right) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (right) visits the Thermal Protection System Facility. At left is Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) talks to Martin Wilson, project manager. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0324

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) talks to Martin Wilson, project manager. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines.  From left is Glen Mahone, acting director for NASA Public Affairs, Jim Kennedy, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center, O'Keefe, Lee Zook, project leader, and Chuck Fontana, associate program manager, Integrated Logistics. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0328

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Thermal Protection System Facility, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (center) looks at a Dome Heat Shield blanket that is used for Shuttle engines. From left is Glen Mahone,... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) speaks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in protecting orbiters from the intense heat of launch and re-entry.  TPS tiles have been discussed in the investigation into the Columbia tragedy that destroyed the orbiter and claimed the lives of seven astronauts. KSC-03pd0325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) s...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (left) speaks to workers in the Thermal Protection System Facility. O'Keefe is visiting the site to learn more about the TPS products and process in... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (third from left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (second from left), the shop manager. Gehman and other members of the board are visiting sites at KSC to become familiar with the Shuttle launch process. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on Feb. 1 during reentry. KSC-03pd0362

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (third from left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Marti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (second from right), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (left), the shop manager. Gehman and other members of the board are visiting sites at KSC to become familiar with the Shuttle launch process. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on Feb. 1 during reentry. KSC-03pd0360

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (second from right), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Mar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (center), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (pointing), the shop manager. Gehman and other members of the board are visiting sites at KSC to become familiar with the Shuttle launch process. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on Feb. 1 during reentry. KSC-03pd0361

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (center), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (second from left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (second from right), the shop manager. Gehman and other members of the board are visiting sites at KSC to become familiar with the Shuttle launch process. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on Feb. 1 during reentry. KSC-03pd0359

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (second from left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Mart... more

US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal Mikel Hostallero (left) and Private First Class (PFC) Alex Alba, both assigned to Weapons Platoon, Alpha Company, 1ST Battalion, 7th Marines, Battle Site Zero (BZO) their 7.62mm M240G machine gun, equipped with an AN/PSA-13 Thermal Weapons Site (TWS), on the range at Camp Coyote, Kuwait during Operation ENDURING FREEDOM

US Marine Corps (USMC) Corporal Mikel Hostallero (left) and Private Fi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: ENDURING FREEDOM Base: Camp Coyote Country: Kuwait (KWT) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Kevin C Quihuis Jr, USMC Release Status... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (right), the shop manager. Gehman and other members of the board are visiting sites at KSC to become familiar with the Shuttle launch process. The independent board is charged with determining what caused the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia and the loss of its seven-member crew on Feb. 1 during reentry. KSC-03pd0358

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Retired Navy Admiral Harold W. Gehman Jr. (left), chairman of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, visits the Thermal Protection System shop and is briefed by Martin Wilson (r... more

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) John Williams, Crewchief, 31st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (31 AMXS), changes the Jet Fuel Starter (JFS) Thermal Couple Harness reflected in the mirror STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Daniel Higgins is holding. The JFS Thermal Couple Harness detects the inlet and exhaust temperature and sends the signal to the engine so it can adjust accordingly

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) John Williams, Crewchief,...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Aviano Air Base State: Pordenone Country: Italy (ITA) Scene Major Command Shown: USAFE Scene Camera Operator: A1C Isaac G. L. Freeman, USAF Rel... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left)  Mike Cote, Tom Baggitt, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1085

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Mike Cote, Tom Baggitt, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main land... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left)  Harrell Watts, Mike Cote, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1086

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Harrell Watts, Mike Cote, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main la... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Harrell Watts applies RTV, a room-temperature vulcanizing silicone adhesive, to a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101) on which Thermal Protection System tiles are being installed.  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1083

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Harrell Watts applies RTV, a room-temperature vulcanizing silicone adhesive, to a main landing gear door of Space... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) John Kuhn, Mike Cote, and Tom Baggitt discuss the installation of Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1080

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) John Kuhn, Mike Cote, and Tom Baggitt discuss the installation of Thermal Protection System tiles on... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Dave Sanborn (left) conducts a bond verification test on Thermal Protection System tiles installed on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101). Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1084

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Dave Sanborn (left) conducts a bond verification test on Thermal Protection System tiles installed on a main land... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Dave Sanborn, Butch Lato, and Bill Brooks conduct a bond verification test on Thermal Protection System tiles newly installed on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1082

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Dave Sanborn, Butch Lato, and Bill Brooks conduct a bond verification test on Thermal Protection Sys... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Mike Cote works on installing Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1078

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employee Mike Cote works on installing Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbite... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an employee from The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., installs a strain gauge on a test panel prior to installation of Thermal Protection System tile on the panel.  The test panel and sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101) will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete.  The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.  Sections of Enterprise   were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1068

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an e...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an employee from The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., installs a strain gauge on a test panel prior to installation of Thermal Protection S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Harrell Watts, Lynn Wozniak, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main landing gear door of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101).  Sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight.  After the tile installation is complete, the sections will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. KSC-03pd1065

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Unit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, United Space Alliance employees (from left) Harrell Watts, Lynn Wozniak, and Jason Levandusky install Thermal Protection System tiles on a main ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, employees from The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., install a strain gauge on a test panel prior to installation of Thermal Protection System tile on the panel.  The test panel and sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101) will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete.  The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.  Sections of Enterprise   were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport.  Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1069

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, empl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, employees from The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., install a strain gauge on a test panel prior to installation of Thermal Protection Syst... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop is being used to support the Columbia mishap investigation.  A simulated orbiter wing and several test panels, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1145

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A main landing gear door mounting fixtur...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop is being used to support the Columbia mishap investigation. A simulated orbiter wing and several test panels... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Paul King, an employee of The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., installs a strain gauge on a simulated orbiter wing in preparation for Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation.  The wing, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after the tile installation is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1150

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Paul King, an employee of The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, Calif., installs a strain gauge on a simulated orbiter wing in preparation for... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance technician Matt Boonstra works on a main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop. The fixture is being used to support the Columbia mishap investigation.  A simulated orbiter wing and several test panels, along with sections of Space Shuttle orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), will be transferred to the Southwest Research Institute for testing after Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile installation on them is complete. The testing has been requested by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board. For this initiative, sections of Enterprise were borrowed from the Smithsonian Institution's Air and Space Museum where the orbiter is being stored at the Washington Dulles International Airport. Enterprise was the first orbiter built in the Shuttle fleet and was used to conduct the Approach and Landing Test Program before the first powered Shuttle flight. KSC-03pd1146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance technician Matt Bo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance technician Matt Boonstra works on a main landing gear door mounting fixture in the Launch Equipment Shop. The fixture is being used to support the Columbia mi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the RLV Hangar, a member of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team places recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1153

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, a member of the Colu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, a member of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team places recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shippe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1152

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Colum...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Colum...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped from Barksdale Air Force Base, Shreveport, La., more than 70,000 items, weighing 78,000 pounds, about 36 percent of the Shuttle by weight, have been delivered to KSC for use in the mishap investigation. Ground teams have completed 78 percent of their primary search area, and airborne crews finished 80 percent of their assigned area. Search teams have completed 98 percent of the underwater searches in Lake Nacogdoches and Toledo Bend Reservoir. KSC-03pd1154

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Colum...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the RLV Hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Project team place recovered Thermal Protection System (TPS) tile on a tabletop mock-up of the wing of Columbia. Shipped ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Team work to identify pieces of Thermal Protection System tile from the left wing of Columbia recovered during the search and recovery efforts in East Texas.  The items shipped to KSC number more than 82,000 and weigh 84,800 pounds or 38 percent of the total dry weight of Columbia. Of those items, 78,760 have been identified, with 753 placed on the left wing grid in the Hangar.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar, members of the Columb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar, members of the Columbia Reconstruction Team work to identify pieces of Thermal Protection System tile from the left wing of Columbia recovered during the search ... more

Russian Navy Admiral (ADM) Viktor Dmitrievich Fedorov (right), Commander, Russian Navy Pacific Fleet, listens a US Navy (USN) Sailor assigned aboard the USN LOS ANGELES CLASS: Attack Submarine USS CHICAGO (SSN 721), explains the workings of a Thermal Imager Fire Detection Device, during the Admirals visit aboard ship at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (HI)

Russian Navy Admiral (ADM) Viktor Dmitrievich Fedorov (right), Command...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pearl Harbor State: Hawaii (HI) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH3 Casey L. James, Usn Release Status: Released ... more

Mr. Kenny Padgett a Fireman with the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), enter a smoke filled building during a training exercise designed to familiarize firefighters with a new piece of equipment called a Thermal Imager. The Thermal Imager works by detecting heat much like an infrared camera would do, this allows firefighters to locate both fire that might be hidden in the walls and victims that they might otherwise not be able to locate

Mr. Kenny Padgett a Fireman with the Structural Fire Division (SFD), a...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcas, Beaufort State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Leslie J. Hewitt, USMC Release Sta... more

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), enter a smoke filled building during a training exercise designed to familiarize firefighters with a new piece of equipment called a Thermal Imager. The Thermal Imager works by detecting heat much like an infrared camera would do, this allows firefighters to locate both fire that might be hidden in the walls and victims that they might otherwise not be able to locate

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcas, Beaufort State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Leslie J. Hewitt, USMC Release Sta... more

Mr. Kenny Padgett a Fireman with the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), enter a smoke filled building during a training exercise designed to familiarize firefighters with a new piece of equipment called a Thermal Imager. The Thermal Imager works by detecting heat much like an infrared camera would do, this allows firefighters to locate both fire that might be hidden in the walls and victims that they might otherwise not be able to locate

Mr. Kenny Padgett a Fireman with the Structural Fire Division (SFD), a...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcas, Beaufort State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Leslie J. Hewitt, USMC Release Sta... more

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), enter a smoke filled building during a training exercise designed to familiarize firefighters with a new piece of equipment called a Thermal Imager. The Thermal Imager works by detecting heat much like an infrared camera would do, this allows firefighters to locate both fire that might be hidden in the walls and victims that they might otherwise not be able to locate

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcas, Beaufort State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Leslie J. Hewitt, USMC Release Sta... more

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina (SC), enter a smoke filled building during a training exercise designed to familiarize firefighters with a new piece of equipment called a Thermal Imager. The Thermal Imager works by detecting heat much like an infrared camera would do, this allows firefighters to locate both fire that might be hidden in the walls and victims that they might otherwise not be able to locate

Firefighters assigned to the Structural Fire Division (SFD), at Marine...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcas, Beaufort State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: LCPL Leslie J. Hewitt, USMC Release Sta... more

U. S. Congressman Culbertson, Texas and Mr John Webb, Webb & Associates visit and tour Ames Research Center with Center Director G. Scott Hubbard (pre-tour briefing at the Thermal Protection Facility - Arc Jet by Sylvia Johnson) ARC-2003-ACD03-0183-030

U. S. Congressman Culbertson, Texas and Mr John Webb, Webb & Associate...

U. S. Congressman Culbertson, Texas and Mr John Webb, Webb & Associates visit and tour Ames Research Center with Center Director G. Scott Hubbard (pre-tour briefing at the Thermal Protection Facility - Arc Jet ... more

R&D 100 Award Winner Defect Clustering Thermal & Env. Barrier Coatings (TEBCs) for Si-Based Ceramic Turbine Engine Components GRC-2007-C-01626

R&D 100 Award Winner Defect Clustering Thermal & Env. Barrier Coatings...

R&D 100 Award Winner Defect Clustering Thermal & Env. Barrier Coatings (TEBCs) for Si-Based Ceramic Turbine Engine Components

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to Ames Research Center: while on tour of the Arc Jet Facility with G. Scott Hubbard, Raj Venkatapathy and entourage.  Wiler uses special viewing glasses to observe a test run of Thermal Protection Materials. ARC-2003-ACD03-0231-012

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to A...

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to Ames Research Center: while on tour of the Arc Jet Facility with G. Scott Hubbard, Raj Venkatapathy and entourage. Wiler uses special viewin... more

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to Ames Research Center: on tour of the Arc Jet Facility with G. Scott Hubbard, Raj Venkatapathy and entourage.  Wiler and Hubbard use special viewing glasses to observe a test run of Thermal Protection Materials. ARC-2003-ACD03-0231-010

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to A...

NASA Space Science Advisory Committee Chairman Ed Wiler (r) visit to Ames Research Center: on tour of the Arc Jet Facility with G. Scott Hubbard, Raj Venkatapathy and entourage. Wiler and Hubbard use special v... more

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body flap Seal testing in the Panel Test Facility PFT-115 ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-100

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body flap Seal testing in the Panel Test Fac...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body flap Seal testing in the Panel Test Facility PFT-115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) Deputy Space Shuttle Program Manager of Operations Loren Shriver, USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik, and USA Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro examine a tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) in KSC's TPS Facility.  NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday.  The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) D...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, United Space Alliance (USA) Deputy Space Shuttle Program Manager of Operations Loren Shriver, USA Associate Program Manager of Ground Operations Andy Allen, NASA Deputy ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (third from left) watch as a USA technician (right) creates a tile for use in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS).  NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday.  The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice Preside...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro (left) and NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs M... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Manager Howard DeCastro are briefed on the properties of the tile used in the Shuttle's Thermal Protection System (TPS) by USA Manager of the TPS Facility Martin Wilson (right).  NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday.  The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Adminis...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From left, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik and United Space Alliance (USA) Vice President and Space Shuttle Program Man... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility Martin Wilson (right) briefs NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle Programs Michael Kostelnik (left) on the properties of a thermal blanket used in the Shuttle's TPS.  NASA and USA Space Shuttle program management are participating in a leadership workday.  The day is intended to provide management with an in-depth, hands-on look at Shuttle processing activities at KSC.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) Manager of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility Martin Wilson (right) briefs NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Space Station and Shuttle P... more

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-071

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 with (l) Duoc Tran, Boeing Test engineer and (r) Vincent Meglio, NASA lead Engineering Technician / Operator ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-037

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 with (l) Duoc Tran, Boeing Test engineer and (r) Vincent Meglio, NASA lead Engineering Technician / Operator

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-072

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-034

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 With Winnie Chen, and Patric Briney, Boeing test engineers ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-006

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 With Winnie Chen, and Patric Briney, Boeing test engineers

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 With Winnie Chen, Boeing test engineer ARC-2003-ACD03-0242-007

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PT...

Thermal Evaluaion of X-37 Body Flap Sea test in Panel Test Facility PTF-115 With Winnie Chen, Boeing test engineer