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Topic: test flight

1909
1909
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2017
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2017
3,541 media by topicpage 1 of 36
Jet military fighter.

Jet military fighter.

Copyright-free airplane pictures. Free to use images of airplanes.

Jet fighter test.

Jet fighter test.

Copyright-free airplane pictures. Free to use images of airplanes.

The Wright Brothers test fly their aircraft on Fort Myer's parade field. This series of test flights resulted in the Army purchasing its first aircraft. In the first flight, Sept. 9, 1908, Orville Wright kept the plane aloft 71 seconds. The second flight resulted in a crash that left Wright severely cut and bruised and his passenger, Army LT. Thomas Selfridge dead -- the first powered-aviation fatality. (Exact date shot UNKNOWN)

The Wright Brothers test fly their aircraft on Fort Myer's parade fiel...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Myer, Arlington State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Pub... more

Airplanes - Engines - Liberty Airplane Engine Test. Plane with Liberty engine in test flight from Dayton, Ohio to Detroit, Michigan. The photograph was taken at the arrival of the plane at the Detroit Fair Grounds. The plane made the flight back to Daytona

Airplanes - Engines - Liberty Airplane Engine Test. Plane with Liberty...

Photographer: Liberty Motor Co. Airplanes - Engines

Airplanes - Miscellaneous - First photos taken by Government permission at the Army Aviation School at Mineola, L.I., N.Y., after the outbreak of the war. Photo shows Army officers observing students on test flights. Int. Film Ser

Airplanes - Miscellaneous - First photos taken by Government permissio...

Date Taken: 1917 Photographer: International Film Service Airplanes - Miscellaneous

Airplanes - Engines - Liberty Airplane Engine Test. Plane with Liberty engine in test flight from Dayton, Ohio to Detroit, Michigan. The photograph was taken at the arrival of the plane at the Detroit Fair Grounds. The plane made the flight back to Daytona

Airplanes - Engines - Liberty Airplane Engine Test. Plane with Liberty...

Photographer: Liberty Motor Co. Airplanes - Engines

W.H. MCAVOY AMES TEST PILOT RETURNING FROM AN EARLY FLIGHT OF FIRST TEST AIRPLANE AT AMES, A NORTH AMERICAN O-47 ARC-1998-M-925-1

W.H. MCAVOY AMES TEST PILOT RETURNING FROM AN EARLY FLIGHT OF FIRST TE...

W.H. MCAVOY AMES TEST PILOT RETURNING FROM AN EARLY FLIGHT OF FIRST TEST AIRPLANE AT AMES, A NORTH AMERICAN O-47

A new three-place North American O-47A observation airplane with Army Air Corps marking was the first ircraft to arrive at Ames. The Circular antenna on top of the canopy is for direction finding.  A close look show that help from the front cockpit was needed for directional control when using a rope (instead of a tow bar) to tow the aircraft.  (Sept 1940). W.H. McAvoy Ames test pilot returning from an early flight of first test airplane at Ames, a North American O-47A-1 (or 0-47 AAC37-323) This aircraft severed for a short time upon arrival as a research aircraft for heated-wing deicing.  NOTE: printed in  NASA Ames Publications: Adventures in Research - SP-4320 57 Years - Flight Research at AMES - NASA SP-1998-3300 ARC-1969-M-925

A new three-place North American O-47A observation airplane with Army ...

A new three-place North American O-47A observation airplane with Army Air Corps marking was the first ircraft to arrive at Ames. The Circular antenna on top of the canopy is for direction finding. A close look... more

NACA photographer Ice Reearch being conducted at NACA Ames Aeronautical Laboratory on a Lockheed 12-A,  NACA 97; test #4, ice on tell-tale strut in flight ARC-1941-AAL-1697

NACA photographer Ice Reearch being conducted at NACA Ames Aeronautica...

NACA photographer Ice Reearch being conducted at NACA Ames Aeronautical Laboratory on a Lockheed 12-A, NACA 97; test #4, ice on tell-tale strut in flight

De-icing Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Icing flight test on C-46 airplane (flight 29 11:25am to 12:50 am)  glaze ice on loop antenna co-pilots airspeed mast. ARC-1944-AAL-5010

De-icing Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Icing fl...

De-icing Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Icing flight test on C-46 airplane (flight 29 11:25am to 12:50 am) glaze ice on loop antenna co-pilots airspeed mast.

16-Inch Diameter Ramjet Prepared for Flight Test

16-Inch Diameter Ramjet Prepared for Flight Test

A NACA researcher prepares a 16-inch diameter and 16-foot long ramjet for a launch over Wallops Island in July 1947. The Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory conducted a wide variety of studies on ramjets in the ... more

North American XF-82 Twin Mustang Prepares for Ramjet Test Flight

North American XF-82 Twin Mustang Prepares for Ramjet Test Flight

Pilot William Swann, right cockpit, prepares the North American XF-82 Twin Mustang for flight at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory. The aircraft was one o... more

Ames Pilot George Cooper (l) and Ames Director Smith DeFrance discuss F-86 flight test ARC-1969-A-16539

Ames Pilot George Cooper (l) and Ames Director Smith DeFrance discuss ...

Ames Pilot George Cooper (l) and Ames Director Smith DeFrance discuss F-86 flight test

Pilot George Cooper on flightline after test flight holding a dead bird (duck / goose) apparently brought down by his aircraft ARC-1957-A74-2170

Pilot George Cooper on flightline after test flight holding a dead bir...

Pilot George Cooper on flightline after test flight holding a dead bird (duck / goose) apparently brought down by his aircraft

NACA Photographer North American F-100A (NACA-200) Super Sabre Airplane take-off. The blowing-tupe boundary-layer control on the leading- and trailing-edge provided large reductions in takeoff and landing approach speeds. Approach speeds were reduced by about 10 knots (Mar 1960). Note:  Used in publication in Flight Research at Ames;  57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology NASA SP-1998-3300 fig. 102 and and Memoirs of a Flight Test Engneer NASA SP-2002-4525 ARC-1957-A-22640

NACA Photographer North American F-100A (NACA-200) Super Sabre Airplan...

NACA Photographer North American F-100A (NACA-200) Super Sabre Airplane take-off. The blowing-tupe boundary-layer control on the leading- and trailing-edge provided large reductions in takeoff and landing appro... more

Photograph of John Glenn Seating inside the Mercury Capsule during a Flight Simulation Test

Photograph of John Glenn Seating inside the Mercury Capsule during a F...

Original caption: Astronaut, John Glenn, in space suit seated in Mercury Capsule, is undergoing a flight simulation test. The first attempt to put a man into space by the U.S. aboard a Mercury Capsule will be ... more

NACA Photographer Thrust reverser on F-94C-1 (AF50-956 NACA 156) Starfire (l to R) Air Force Major E. Sommerich; Ames Engineer Seth Anderson,  Lt. Col. Tavasti; and Ames Chief test pilot George Cooper discussing phases of flight evaluation tests. Note:  Used in publication in Flight Research at Ames;  57 Years of Development and Validation of Aeronautical Technology NASA SP-1998-3300 fig 91 ARC-1958-A-23928

NACA Photographer Thrust reverser on F-94C-1 (AF50-956 NACA 156) Starf...

NACA Photographer Thrust reverser on F-94C-1 (AF50-956 NACA 156) Starfire (l to R) Air Force Major E. Sommerich; Ames Engineer Seth Anderson, Lt. Col. Tavasti; and Ames Chief test pilot George Cooper discussin... more

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP.  Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane.  Bell VTOL tilt-rotor aircraft hovering along side Hangar One at Moffett Field. The XV-3 design combined a helicopter rotor and a wing. A 450 horsepower Pratt & Whitney piston engine drove the two rotors. The XV-3, first flown in 1955 , was the first tilt-rotor to achieve 100% tilting of rotors. The vehicle was underpowered, however, and could not hover out of ground effect. Note the large ventral fin, which was added to imrpove directional stability in cruse (Oct 1962) ARC-1959-A-25685-14

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP. Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane. Bell ...

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP. Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane. Bell VTOL tilt-rotor aircraft hovering along side Hangar One at Moffett Field. The XV-3 design combined a helicopter rotor and a wing. A 450 hors... more

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP.  Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane.  Bell VTOL tilt-rotor aircraft hovering in front of building N-211 at Moffett Field. The XV-3 design combined a helicopter rotor and a wing. A 450 horsepower Pratt & Whitney piston engine drove the two rotors. The XV-3, first flown in 1955 , was the first tilt-rotor to achieve 100% tilting of rotors. The vehicle was underpowered, however, and could not hover out of ground effect. Note the large ventral fin, which was added to imrpove directional stability in cruse (Oct 1962) ARC-1959-AC-25685

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP. Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane. Bell ...

XV-3 HOVERING ON RAMP. Flight Test of Bell XV-3 Convertiplane. Bell VTOL tilt-rotor aircraft hovering in front of building N-211 at Moffett Field. The XV-3 design combined a helicopter rotor and a wing. A 450... more

The static firing of a Saturn F-1 engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Static Test Stand.  The F-1 engine is a single-start, 1,5000,000 Lb fixed-thrust, bipropellant rocket system. The engine uses liquid oxygen as the oxidizer and RP-1 (kerosene) as fuel. The five-engine cluster used on the first stage of the Saturn V produces 7,500,000 lbs of thrust. n/a

The static firing of a Saturn F-1 engine at the Marshall Space Flight ...

The static firing of a Saturn F-1 engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center's Static Test Stand. The F-1 engine is a single-start, 1,5000,000 Lb fixed-thrust, bipropellant rocket system. The engine uses liqui... more

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. Construction of the S-IC test stand came to a halt at the end of September as the determination was made that the Saturn booster size had to be increased. As a result, the stand had to be modified. With construction delayed, and pumps turned off, this photo, taken December 11, 1961, shows the abandoned site with floods above the 18 ft mark. The flooding was caused by the disturbance of a natural spring months prior during the excavation of the site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the...

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, th... more

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire wing is indicated by tufts when wing had been modified to incorporate leading-edge slats. Tests showed that it could be flown at speeds as low as 6 knots when out of ground effect (which increases lift). April 1963   published in NASA SP-2002-4525 Memoirs of a Flight test Engineer (Seth Anderson) ARC-1962-A-29657-1

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire...

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire wing is indicated by tufts when wing had been modified to incorporate leading-edge slats. Tests showed that it could be flown at speeds as ... more

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related  facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken October 26, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the...

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, th... more

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC test stand, related  facilities were built during this time. Built to the north of the massive S-IC test stand, was the F-1 Engine test stand. The F-1 test stand, a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This photo, taken November 15, 1962, depicts the excavation process of the single engine F-1 stand site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the...

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, th... more

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability is provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This aerial photograph, taken January 15, 1963 gives an overall view of the construction progress of the newly developed test complex. The large white building located in the center is the Block House. Just below and to the right of it is the S-IC test stand. The large hole to the left of the S-IC stand is the F-1 test stand site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the...

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, th... more

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. The F-1 Engine test stand was built north of the massive S-IC test stand. The F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, and was designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability is provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand, the foundation of the F-1 stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade. This aerial photograph, taken January 15, 1963, gives a close overall view of the newly developed test complex. Depicted in the forefront center is the S-IC test stand with towers prominent, the Block House is seen in the center just above the S-IC test stand, and the large hole to the left, located midway between the two is the F-1 test stand site. n/a

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the...

At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, th... more