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1,066 media by topicpage 1 of 11

Plate with a hunting scene from the tale of Bahram Gur and Azadeh

The imagery on this plate represents the earliest known depiction of a well-known episode from the story of Bahram Gur or Bahram V, the Sasanian king (r. 420 –438). The story seems to have been popular for cent... more

"Imperial Visit to the Great Horse Race at the Kaya-no-in Mansion" (Kaya-no-in komakurabe gyōkō emaki), from the Tale of Flowering Fortunes (Eiga monogatari)

A few days in the autumn of 1024 are the setting for this episode from the quasi-historical chronicle of the life of Fujiwara Michinaga (966–1027), the great Heian-court politician and patron of the arts. As th... more

The Tale of Sumiyoshi (Sumiyoshi monogatari)

Anonymously authored in the mid-tenth century, The Tale of Sumiyoshi is one of Japan’s earliest romantic novels, predating The Tale of Genji by a half century. This story of two lovers who, after a long separat... more

Scene from "Channel Buoys" (Miotsukushi), chapter 14 of the Tale of Genji

The absence of an obvious place reference can sometimes make a story all the more poignant. Readers of the text accompanying this scene would have known that Sumiyoshi— renowned for the serene beauty of its pin... more

Battle at Rokuhara, from The Tale of the Heiji Rebellion (Heiji monogatari)

This fragment is one of fourteen salvaged from a handscroll illustrating the epic battle narrative The Tale of the Heiji Rebellion, which describes the confrontation in late 1159 between two rival military clan... more

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night (Aki no yo nagamonogatari)

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night became popular in Japan in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. It tells of an amorous affair between a Buddhist monk and a younger male acolyte (chigo). The usual outcom... more

Detached section from scroll one from A Long Tale for an Autumn Night (Aki no yo nagamonogatari), now remounted in original position as part of 2002.459.1

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night represents a genre of story that became popular in Japan in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. It tells of an amorous affair between a Buddhist monk and a younger male ... more

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night (Aki no yo nagamonogatari)

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night represents a genre of story that became popular in Japan in the late fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. It tells of an amorous affair between a Buddhist monk and a younger male ... more

The Final Scene from A Long Tale for an Autumn Night (Aki no yonaga monogatari)

This scene presents the conclusion of the amorous tale of a Buddhist monk and his young acolyte, in which the latter commits suicide. A procession for raigo-e, a ritual ceremony celebrating Amida Buddha and his... more

A Long Tale for an Autumn Night (Aki no yo nagamonogatari)

This set of illustrated handscrolls (emaki), with the narrative progressing from right to left, tells of an amorous affair between a Buddhist monk and a younger male acolyte (chigo), a genre of story popular in... more

Scene from “The Oak Tree” (“Kashiwagi”), from The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

Kashiwagi, the younger son of Prince Genji’s brother-in-law, lies on his sick bed. In the adjoining room his father and an ascetic confer about his condition. Kashiwagi had been beset by grave illness after suf... more

“The Jeweled Chaplet” (“Tamakazura”), from The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

This album-leaf painting illustrates an episode from the “The Jeweled Chaplet” chapter from The Tale of Genji in which the New Year’s robes are distributed to the ladies of Genji’s household. Genji is shown sea... more

The Battle at Ichinotani, Scenes from The Tale of the Heike

The victory of the Minamoto over the Taira, which left the samurai class in power in Japan for more than seven centuries, was assured by this battle fought off the shores of western Japan in the second month of... more

Tray with Scene from the Tale of Genji

The size, geometric motifs, and extensive use of pearl shell suggest that this tray may have been intended for trade to Europe. The imagery, however, derives from the Tale of Genji, one of Japan’s most famous l... more

Tale of the Shining Princess

The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter There once lived an old bamboo cutter. One day, he spotted a light shining inside a hollow bamboo stem and discovered a lovely little girl, about three inches tall. Raised by the o... more

Scene from "The Ivy" (Yadorigi), chapter 49 of the Tale of Genji

This painting is a section of a larger painting, cut from a pair of folding screens that featured scenes from the eleventh-century novel The Tale of Genji. Remounted as a hanging scroll, this scene is from a ch... more

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

Yamamoto Shunshō (Japanese, 1610–1682) Edo period (1615–1868)

"Kogō" and "The Imperial Procession to Ōhara", from The Tale of the Heike (Heike monogatari)

These screens depict two iconic scenes from The Tale of the Heike, a fourteenth-century account of late twelfth-century clashes between rival clans the Taira and the Minamoto. The right screen represents the st... more

The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

These two scrolls consist of fifty-four pairings of texts and illustrations on sheets of uniform size. A separate document attributes the painting to Kaihô Yûsetsu, son of the prolific artist Kaihô Yûshô (1535–... more

Scenes from The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

Tosa Mitsunori (Japanese, 1583–1638) Edo period (1615–1868)

The Tale of Genji (Genji Monogatari)

Shōren'in Sonjun Shinnō (Japanese, 1581–1653) Edo period (1615–1868)

Fifty-four Scenes from The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

The Tale of Genji, authored by the female writer Murasaki Shikibu in the early eleventh century, relates the life and loves of the “Shining Prince” Genji and is set in the golden age of the Heian court a couple... more

Scene from The Tale of Genji: Chapter 4, "Evening Face" (Yūgao)

This scene illustrates a celebrated chapter in The Tale of Genji, “Evening Faces (Yūgao).” Genji stops to inquire after his old nurse and glimpses pretty foreheads in the humble house next to the nurse’s home. ... more

The Battle of Yashima, Scenes from The Tale of the Heike

Depicted on this screen is the Battle of Yashima, one of many stirring events recounted in the ballads of the fateful struggles between the Taira clan and their ultimately victorious rivals, the Minamoto. White... more

Scenes from the Tale of Genji

Edo period (1615–1868)

Royal Visit to Ōhara, from The Tale of the Heike

Studio of Tawaraya Sōtatsu (Japanese, died ca. 1640) Edo period (1615–1868)

Abduction Scene from "The Tale of Ise"

Unidentified Artist Edo period (1615–1868)

Incense Container (Kōgō ) in the Form of a Book, with the title“Hana no En” (Festival of the Cherry Blossoms), Chapter 8 of The Tale of Genji

The design of this box imitates a book. Suspended from a branch of the tree is a poem-card (tanzaku) bearing a verse from "The Festival of Cherry Blossoms," Chapter 8 of The Tale of Genji. Edo period (1615–1868)

Incense Box (Kōbako) with Scene from "His Perfumed Highness" (Niou no Miya), chapter 42 of the Tale of Genji

The lid of this box is made of two interlocking seashells illustrating a chapter of the Tale of Genji. Publicly recognized as Genji's son, Kaoru has doubts about the circumstances of his birth. A poem voiced by... more

The Tale of Bunshō (Bunshō monogatari)

Hishikawa Moronobu (Japanese, died 1694) Edo period (1615–1868)

Writing Box with Design of Maple Leaves and Bugaku Hat from the Tale of Genji

A Bugaku hat and scattered maple leaves evoke the aura of the fictional prince Genji, the ideal Heian gentleman of sensitivity, elegance, and accomplishment. The images recall the episode in The Tale of Genji (... more

Case (Inrō) with Design of Courtier and Lady in a Boat (from the Tale of Genji)

After Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Edo period (1615–1868)

Princess Ogimi from the "Bridge Maiden" (Hashihime) chapter from The Tale of Genji (Genji Monogatari)

Hishikawa Waō (Japanese, active early 18th century) Edo period (1615–1868)

The Third Princess and a Cat, from the "New Herbs I" (Wakana I) chapter The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari}

Attributed to Matsuno Chikanobu (Japanese, active early 18th century) Edo period (1615–1868)

Scene from “Imperial Visit to Rokuhara,” from The Tale of the Heiji Rebellion (Heiji monogatari)

The Tale of the Heiji Rebellion tells the story of a short civil war (1159–60) fought in Kyoto between two rival clans, headed by the warriors Minamoto no Yoshitomo and Taira no Kiyomori. The “Imperial Visit to... more

Parody of the Tale of Young Man Lu: Courtesan Dreaming

Harunobu's courtesan—most likely dreaming of the moment when she leaves her childhood home to begin a happy marriage—will shortly waken to be confronted once again with the reality surrounding her. To distingui... more

"Evening Faces" (Yūgao) chapter from The Tale of Genji (Genji monogatari)

Kawamata Tsunemasa (active 1716–48) Edo period (1615–1868)

Parody of the Tale of Young Man Lu: A Fisherman Dreaming

Unidentified Artist Edo period (1615–1868)

Parody of Murasaki Shikibu, Author of The Tale of Genji

An Edo-period courtesan enjoys reading a book titled Genji. Her pose and the setting are clearly modeled on the conventional iconography of portraits of one of the most important figures in classical Japanese l... more

Parody of Murasaki, from "Lavender" (Wakamurasaki), chapter 5 of the Tale of Genji

The Tale of Genji was the most celebrated courtly romance of the twelfth century. The scene parodied here refers to the moment when the story's protagonist, Genji, glimpses the young Murasaki for the first time... more

decoration from "The Tit-bit, a tale. [In verse.]"

This image has been taken from scan 000003 from "The Tit-bit, a tale. [In verse.]". The title and subject terms of this image have been generated from tags, created by users of the British Library's flickr photostream.

architecture from "Four Poems, viz.: I. Armine and Elvira (a legendary tale in two parts by Mr Cartwright). II. The Hermit of Warkworth (a Northumberland ballad in three fits by T. Percy, Bishop of Dromore). III. The Deserted Village (a poem by Dr Goldsmith). IV. The Traveller (a poem by O. Goldsmith)"

This image has been taken from scan 000113 from "Four Poems, viz.: I. Armine and Elvira (a legendary tale in two parts by Mr Cartwright). II. The Hermit of Warkworth (a Northumberland ballad in three fits by T.... more

portrait from "Ecclesiastical Gallantry: or the Mystery Unravelled, a tale, [in verse.] Dedicated to his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, without permission"

This image has been taken from scan 000008 from "Ecclesiastical Gallantry: or the Mystery Unravelled, a tale, [in verse.] Dedicated to his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, without permission". The title and ... more

A Disguised Scene from The Tale of Genji (Fūryū Yatsushi Genji), Chapter 33, “Wisteria Leaves (Fuji no uraba)”

This triptych presents one of the happiest scenes from The Tale of Genji: a gorgeous operatic pageant of beautiful ladies. Here, Yūgiri, the Shining Prince’s son, has won the love of Kumoinokari, daughter of Tō... more