PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout

  • account_boxLogin
4,928 media by topicpage 1 of 50

Poem in Chinese about Sugar

A prominent figure in early fourteenth-century Japanese Zen, Shiren was born into an aristocratic family in Kyoto and studied Zen in Kamakura with the Chinese émigré monk Yishan Yining (Japanese: Issan Ichinei,... more

New Inventions of Modern Times [Nova Reperta], The Invention of Sugar Refinery, plate 13

Thirteenth plate from a print series entitled Nova Reperta (New Inventions of Modern Times) consisting of a title page and 19 plates, engraved by Jan Collaert I, after Jan van der Straet, called Stradanus, and ... more

Sugar box

Sugar boxes came into general use in the late seventeenth century. They were a parallel development along with the introduction of chocolate, coffee, and tea, which were all bitter drinks.

Sugar bowl (?) (part of a service)

The tea service (67.192.1a, b–.16) is an example of "Mandarin" porcelain, painting done in imitation of Chinese export ware with figures in pink, red and blue. It was a style taken from Chinese drawings and use... more

Sugar bowl with cover (part of a service)

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar spoon

Jan Pereboom (1725–1805, master 1751)

Sugar bowl with cover (part of a service)

Naples Royal Porcelain Manufactory (Ferdinand IV period, ca. 1771–ca. 1807)

Sugar bowl

William Adams (1745–1805, active 1780–1804)

Sugar bowl

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar bowl

Sèvres Manufactory (French, 1740–present)

Sugar caster

David André (master 1703, died 1743)

Sugar Box

Only ten casket-form sugar boxes of colonial American manufacture are known. Probably John Coney (1655/56–1722) Made in New Castle, New Hampshire, United States

Sugar box

Ebenezer Roe (entered 1709)

Sugar bowl with cover

John Clifton Sr. (warden in 1723, master in 1725)

Sugar Box

Rare survivals in early American silver, this pair of octagonal tea caddies and matching sugar box emulate contemporary English design. They also evoke the passion for tea–drinking and its costly accessories th... more

Sugar box with cover

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar bowl with cover (part of a service)

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar box

Some wares made early in Du Paquier’s history reveal that the manufactory struggled to perfect firing and decoration. This sugar box has many firing flaws, including a warped lid and grit in the glaze; its deco... more

Sugar bowl with cover

William Bellassyse (active 1716–23)

Miniature sugar bowl with cover

David Clayton (British, active 1689)

Sugar box

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar box with cover

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar bowl

The globular shape is characteristic of Scottish silver in the early eighteenth century. The teapot (68.141.88) is engraved with the arms, crest, and motto of the Craigannet family of Stirlingshire. James Tait ... more

Sugar bowl with cover

Simon Pantin I (British, ca. 1672–1728)

Sugar caster (one of a pair)

Nicolas Besnier (French, 1686–1754, master 1714)

Sugar caster (one of a pair)

Nicolas Besnier (French, 1686–1754, master 1714)

Sugar box

The Du Paquier manufactory made sugar boxes in four basic shapes, including this oval, which is also known in Meissen porcelain and likely was influenced by Baroque silver. Surviving Du Paquier tea, chocolate, ... more

Sugar box with cover

Tobias Remshardt (ca. 1691–1738, master 1721)

Sugar tongs (part of a set)

In the first half of the eighteenth century, tea was a luxury item, an expensive imported commodity. Although most vessels made for the tea service—usually of silver or porcelain—were also expensive, this set o... more

Sugar caster

Jean Lacère (Lasserre), père (master 1701, died 1756)

Sugar bowl (part of a set)

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar bowl with cover

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar bowl with cover

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar caster (part of a service)

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar caster

Pierre Belleville (1700–1765, master 1730)

Sugar bowl with cover

Chantilly (French)

Sugar caster

Ferdinand Lachèse (master 1728)

Sugar bowl

P.S. (active in France)

Sugar caster

Meissen Manufactory (German, 1710–present)

Sugar box

Vienna

Sugar Bowl

Attributed to William Will (1742–1798) or Probably made in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States