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Topic: st u
1858
1858
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2007
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2007
90 media by topicpage 1 of 1

Company Street, Battery D, 1st U.S. Arty., Camp Seymour, Beaufort, S. C.

Photograph shows soldiers on lawn surrounded by camp facilities.

Deputy Under Secretary of the Army, John W. Shanon, joins SSGT Millie Chabrier, 758st U.S. Army Garrison, for a chat at the mess hall during his visit. Looking on are CPT E. Vargas (left) and SSGT Perez (right)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Buchanan, San Juan State: Puerto Rico (PR) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Orlando Hernandez Release Status:... more

Team 4 walks past the Buedingen Schloss on their way to the next challenge. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Martin Greeson, CIV, USA Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milita... more

SPC. Bosold carries a fuel and water can down a steep slope. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and is participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Mr. Martin Greeson, USA, CIV. Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

SGT. O'Donnell Displays personnel gear to earn his spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Martin Greeson, CIV, USA Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milita... more

SGT. Plew, SPC. Bosold, PVT. Kemper, and SGT. Hickey perform a dance before beginning their last task They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Mr. Martin Greeson, USA, CIV. Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes and another Spur candidate assemble a 50 Caliber machine gun. They are from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Martin Greeson, CIV, USA Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milita... more

2nd LT. Belanger in the prone firing position at the gym on Armstrong kaserne with the Blackhawk crest behind him participates in the 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment's Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Martin Greeson, CIV, USA Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milita... more

SGT. 1ST Class Cortes receives his Spur candidate name, luck of the draw, from a spur holder in his attempt to earn spurs. He is from 1ST Armored Division, 1ST U.S. Cavalry Regiment and are participating in a Spur Ride held April 3 and 4, 2006 in Buedingen Germany. (U.S. Army photo by Martin Greeson) (Released)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Buedingen Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: Martin Greeson, CIV, USA Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milita... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, begins on Launch Pad 39A, revealing Space Shuttle Atlantis, bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8 and started at 10:56 p.m. EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1391

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, begins on Launch Pad 39A, revealing Space Shuttle Atlantis, bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform. Rollback is one of t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform as technicians in the control booth roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, away from the orbiter. Rollback is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. and was complete at 11:34 p.m EDT. The RSS provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd1395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform as technicians in the control booth roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, aw... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, o... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A by Theaphlias B. Terrell, operations manager of Bionetics Photoservice, following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1401

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A by Theaphlias B. Terrell, operations manager of Bionetics Photoservice, following sunrise on... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1402

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 300,000-gallo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground, photographers position themselves on the crawlerway, in hopes of capturing a unique prelaunch image. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1404

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water ta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water tank that is part of the sound suppression system during launches. In the foreground is the crawlerway. a 130-foot-wide roadway with a 5-percent grade leading to the top of the launch pad. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1403

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On a cloudy Florida day, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. At the right of the pad is the 290-foot tall, 300,000-gallon water ta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The lightning mast on Launch Pad 39A stands ready to protect Space Shuttle Atlantis from potential thunderstorms following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1400

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The lightning mast on Launch Pad 39A stands ready to protect Space Shuttle Atlantis from potential thunderstorms following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's ro... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The sun rises on a cloudy Florida day to reveal Space Shuttle Atlantis awaiting launch atop a mobile launch platform at Launch Pad 39A. Rollback of the pad's rotating service struc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure, or RSS, is one of the milestones in preparation for the launch of mission STS-117 on June 8. Rollback started at 10:56 p.m. EDT June 7 and was complete at 11:34 p.m. The RSS, the massive structure to the left of the shuttle, provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the side of the pad's flame trench. The hinge column rests on the pad surface and is braced to the fixed service structure. Support for the outer end of the bridge is provided by two eight-wheel, motor-driven trucks that move along circular twin rails installed flush with the pad surface. The track crosses the flame trench on a permanent bridge. The RSS is 102 feet long, 50 feet wide and 130 feet high. The structure has orbiter access platforms at five levels to provide access to the payload bay while the orbiter is being serviced in the RSS. Each platform has independent extendable planks that can be arranged to conform to a payload's configuration. This mission is the 118th shuttle flight and the 21st U.S. flight to the International Space Station and will deliver and install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1399

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cameras are prepared to record the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis from Launch Pad 39A following sunrise on a cloudy Florida day. Rollback of the pad's rotating service structure,... more

1st U.S. colored infantry

Photograph shows troops in formation during review.

1st U.S. colored infantry

Photograph shows troops in formation during review.

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, winter quarters at Brandy Station, December 1863-April 1864.

[Brandy Station, Va. Officers and men of Co. K, 1st U.S. Cavalry (1st Division, Cavalry Corps)]

Photograph from the main eastern theater of the war, winter quarters at Brandy Station, December 1863-April 1864.