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Topic: sspf

1997
1997
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2017
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2017
445 media by topicpage 1 of 5
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. STS-88 is the first International Space Station assembly flight. KSC-97PC1265

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. STS-88 is the first International Space Station assembly flight. KSC-97PC1264

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1), scheduled to fly on Space Shuttle mission STS-88 is undergoing processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). A PMA is a cone... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The SPACEHAB Double Module which will be used primarily as a cargo container for Space Shuttle Mission STS-86 makes a temporary stop at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) en route to Launch Pad 39A. SPACEHAB will be put into the payload canister in the SSPF. The module was prepared for flight at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. About three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies will be exchanged between Atlantis and the Mir during the mission. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the Russian space station, replacing NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1337

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The SPACEHAB Double Module which will be...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The SPACEHAB Double Module which will be used primarily as a cargo container for Space Shuttle Mission STS-86 makes a temporary stop at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF)... more

Workers in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) observe the Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) as it moves past them on its way to its workstand, where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the International Space Station. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc153

Workers in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (S...

Workers in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) observe the Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) as it moves past them on its way to its workstand, where it will ... more

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved past a Pressurized Mating Adapter in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) toward the workstand where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the International Space Station. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc151

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved...

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved past a Pressurized Mating Adapter in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) toward the workstand where it will be ... more

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lifted from its container in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) before it is moved into its workstand, where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the International Space Station. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc155

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lifte...

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lifted from its container in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) before it is moved into its workstand, where it will... more

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lowered into its workstand at Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the International Space Station. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc154

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lower...

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lowered into its workstand at Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, s... more

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved through Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) toward the workstand where it will be processed for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the International Space Station. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc150

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved...

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved through Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) toward the workstand where it will be processed for flight on STS-9... more

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved past Node 1, seen at left, of the International Space Station (ISS) in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The IEA will be processed at the SSPF for flight on STS-97, scheduled for launch in April 1999. The IEA is one of four integral units designed to generate, distribute, and store power for the ISS. It will carry solar arrays, power storage batteries, power control units, and a thermal control system. The 16-foot-long, 16,850-pound unit is now undergoing preflight preparations in the SSPF KSC-98pc152

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved...

The Photovoltaic Module 1 Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved past Node 1, seen at left, of the International Space Station (ISS) in Kennedy Space Center’s Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, senior government officials from 15 countries participating in the space station program signed agreements in Washington D.C. on Jan. 29 to establish the framework of cooperation among the partners on the design, development, operation and utilization of the space station. Acting Secretary of State Strobe Talbott signed the 1998 Intergovernmental Agreement on Space Station Cooperation with representatives of Russia, Japan, Canada, and participating countries of the European Space Agency ESA -- Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Some of these officials then toured Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility SSPF with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, at front, sixth from the left. They are, left to right, front to back: Hidetoshi Murayama, National Space Development Agency of Japan NASDA Louis Laurent, Embassy of France Haakon Blankenborg, Norwegian Parliament Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs His Excellency Joris Vos, ambassador of the Netherlands His Excellency Tom Vraalsen, ambassador of Norway Goldin Luigi Berlinguer, Italian minister for education, scientific, and technological research Antonio Rodota, director general, ESA Yvan Ylieff, Belgian minister of science and chairman of the ESA Ministerial Council Jacqueline Ylieff Masaaki Komatsu, Kennedy local NASDA representative and interpreter Serge Ivanets, space attache, Embassy of Russia Hiroshi Fujita, Science and Technology Agency of Japan Akira Mizutani, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Peter Grognard, science attache', Royal Embassy of Belgium Michelangelo Pipan, Italian diplomatic counselor to the minister His Excellency Gerhard Fulda, German Federal Foreign Office Jorg Feustel-Buechl, ESA director of manned space flight and microgravity A. Yakovenko, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs JoAnn Morgan, Kennedy associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades Steve Francois, director, International Space Station and Shuttle Processing Roy Tharpe, Boeing launch site manager Jon Cowart, ISS elements manager John Schumacher, NASA associate administrator for external relations Didier Kechemair, space advistor to the French minister for education, research, and technology Yoshinori Yoshimura, NASDA and Loren Shriver, Kennedy deputy director for launch and payload processing. Node 1 of the ISS is in the background. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-98pc246

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, senior government officials from 15 countries participating in the space station program... more

Workers in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) assist in removing the protective casing from the Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999. The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc299

Workers in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) assist in re...

Workers in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) assist in removing the protective casing from the Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard S... more

The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc300

The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 m...

The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSP... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved to its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved to its workstand for proce... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved toward its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc306

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved toward its workstand for p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, Calif., for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions KSC-98pc309

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Hu... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions KSC-98pc313

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Stat... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, Calif., for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions. KSC-98pc310

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Hu... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen at the right of the photograph, the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions KSC-98pc311

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen at the right of the photograph, the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen at the right of the photograph, the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions KSC-98pc312

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Stat... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Huntington Beach, Calif., for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). While in orbit, PMA-3 will be removed from the orbiter's payload bay by the astronauts using the remote manipulator arm and mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the International Space Station during later assembly missions KSC-98pc308

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3), an element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, arrived from the Boeing Company in Hu... more

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious "dark matter" that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc587

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectr...

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in t... more

Boeing technicians discuss mating Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year, along with PMAs 1 and 2. This PMA is a cone-shaped connector to Node 1, which will have two PMAs attached once this mate is completed. Once in space, Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-98pc590

Boeing technicians discuss mating Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 t...

Boeing technicians discuss mating Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the first element of the IS... more

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is in the process of being mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) under the supervision of Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year, along with PMAs 1 and 2. This PMA is a cone-shaped connector to Node 1, which will have two PMAs attached once this mate is completed. Once in space, Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-98pc592

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is in the process of being mated to...

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is in the process of being mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) under the supervision of Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSP... more

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is moved into position to be mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) by Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year, along with PMAs 1 and 2. This PMA is a cone-shaped connector to Node 1, which will have two PMAs attached once this mate is completed. Once in space, Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-98pc591

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is moved into position to be mated ...

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is moved into position to be mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) by Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is moved into position to be mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) by Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year, along with PMAs 1 and 2. This PMA is a cone-shaped connector to Node 1, which will have two PMAs attached once this mate is completed. Once in space, Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-98pc589

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is mo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 is moved into position to be mated to Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS) by Boeing technicians in KSC's Space Station Processing Fac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc645

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc644

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing by Boeing technicians in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc646

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing by Boeing technicians in its workstand in the Space ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Unity connecting module is viewed from above while it awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the side can be seen the connecting hatch. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station KSC-98pc995

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Unity connecting module is viewed fr...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Unity connecting module is viewed from above while it awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the side can be seen the connecting hatch. The Unity... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) can be seen (left to right) Unity connecting module, the Rack Insertion Device and the first Multi-Purpose Launch Module, the Leonardo. Windows at the right above Leonardo allow visitors on tour to watch the activities in the SSPF. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. The Italian-built MPLM, scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station KSC-98pc994

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this panoramic view of the Space Stat...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this panoramic view of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) can be seen (left to right) Unity connecting module, the Rack Insertion Device and the first Multi-Purpose La... more

(Center) The Multi-Purpose Launch Module, named Leonardo, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At left is a Rack Insertion Device. Above the Leonardo are the windows of the tour room where visitors can watch the activities in the SSPF. Scheduled to be launched on STS-100 on Dec. 2, 1999, the Italian-built MPLM will be carried in the payload bay of the Shuttle orbiter, and will provide storage and additional work space for up to two astronauts when docked to the International Space Station. The Leonardo is the first of three modules being provided by Alenia Aerospazio. The second MPLM, to be handed over in April 1999, is named Raffaello. A third module, to be named Donatello, is due to be delivered in October 2000 for launch in January 2001 KSC-98pc992

(Center) The Multi-Purpose Launch Module, named Leonardo, awaits proce...

(Center) The Multi-Purpose Launch Module, named Leonardo, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At left is a Rack Insertion Device. Above the Leonardo are the windows of the tour ro... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the end at the right can be seen the Pressurized Mating Adapter 2, which provides entry into the module. The Unity, scheduled to be launched on STS-88 in December 1998, will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will already be in orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station KSC-98pc993

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Unity connecting module, part of the Int...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, awaits processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). On the end at the right can be seen the Pressur... more

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is moved into the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned for launch on Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes other research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1035

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is ...

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is moved into the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned for launch ... more

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is uncrated in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned for launch on Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes other research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1033

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is ...

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is uncrated in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned for launch on Oct. 29, 199... more

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is prepared for moving to the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned for launch on Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes other research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1034

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is ...

The HOST (the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test) payload is prepared for moving to the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). HOST is scheduled to fly on the STS-95 mission, planned... more

The Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is placed in a work station in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1319

The Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, ...

The Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is placed in a work station in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch D... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Unity (top) is suspended in air as it is moved to a new location (bottom left)in the SSPF. To its left is Leonardo, the Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to be launched on STS-100. Above Leonardo, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Unity (top) is suspended in air as it is moved to a new location (bottom left)in the SSPF. To its left is Leonardo, the Italian-bui... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers guide the suspended Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, as they move it to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1323

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers guide the sus...

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers guide the suspended Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, as they move it to another location in the SSPF. As the primary pay... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is lowered to its new location in the SSPF. In the background, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is lowered to its new location in the SSPF. In the background... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, hangs suspended during its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1322

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, hangs suspended during its move to another location in the SSP... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) oversee the lifting of the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1321

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) oversee the lifting of the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another locatio... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, sits on a workstand before its move to a new location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1327

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, sits on a workstand before its move to a new location in the ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) attach a frame to lift the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another location in the SSPF. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the Shuttle's payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1320

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) attach a frame to lift the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, for its move to another locatio... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) Unity is suspended in air as it is moved to a now location in the SSPF. At right, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center. As the primary payload on mission STS-88, scheduled to launch Dec. 3, 1998, Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time. In the SSPF, Unity is undergoing testing such as the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle, as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter, and the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27 KSC-98pc1324

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) Unity is suspended in ...

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) Unity is suspended in air as it is moved to a now location in the SSPF. At right, visitors watch through a viewing window, part of the visitors tour at the Center... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), work continues on the U.S. Lab module, Destiny, which is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will become the centerpiece of scientific research on the International Space Station. Destiny shares space in the SSPF with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Leonardo, the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) built by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). The SRTM is targeted for launch on mission STS-99 in September 1999. Leonardo is scheduled to launch on mission STS-102 in June 2000 KSC-99pp0504

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), work continues on the U.S. Lab module, Destiny, which is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Endeavour in early 2000. It will... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers (lower right) disconnect the transport vehicle from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) after moving it into the building for pre-launch preparations. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission targeted for launch in September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth KSC-99pp0505

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers (lower right)...

In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers (lower right) disconnect the transport vehicle from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) after moving it into the building for pre-launch preparat... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility work on Leonardo, the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) built by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). The MPLM, a reusable logistics carrier, will be the primary delivery system used to resupply and return International Space Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the first of three MPLM carriers for the International Space Station. It is scheduled to be launched on Space Shuttle Mission STS-102, targeted for June 2000. Leonardo shares space in the SSPF with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), targeted for launch in September 1999, and Destiny, the U.S. Lab module, targeted for mission STS-98 in late April 2000 KSC-99pp0501

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility work on Leonardo, the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) built by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). The MPLM, a reusable logis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello rests in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) as an Alenia Aerospazio worker passes by. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1027

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello rests in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) as an Alenia Aerospazio worker passes by. The Ital... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers remove the top of the shipping canister from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. After transfer to a workstand, the MPLM will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1021

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers remove the top of the shipping canister from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1029

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics M... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello arrives in its shipping canister at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). There it will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1019

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello arrives in its shipping canister at the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). There it will undergo testing, joining ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers begin removing the shipping canister from around the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. After transfer to a workstand, the MPLM will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1020

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers begin removing the shipping canister from around the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffael... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello waits for transfer to a workstand. There it will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1022

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello waits for transfer to a workstand. There it will under... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes supporting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello lower it onto a transporter for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1017

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes supporting the Multi-Purpose Logi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cranes supporting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello lower it onto a transporter for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers oversee the placement of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello as a crane lowers it onto a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1026

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers oversee the placement of the Mul...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers oversee the placement of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello as a crane lowers it onto a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). O... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is lifted out of its canister by an overhead crane. It will be moved to a workstand to undergo testing. Raffaello joins the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, in the SSPF. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1023

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is lifted out of its canister by an overhead crane. It... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is suspended above a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) where it will undergo testing. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Also inside the SSPF is the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also undergoing testing for its launch on mission STS-102 scheduled for June 29, 2000. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1025

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello is suspended above a workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) where it will undergo testing. One of Ital... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello sits on a transporter waiting for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello will undergo testing, joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1018

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello sits on a transporter waiting for transfer to the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). At the SSPF the Raffaello wil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello. The Italian aerospace company will provide engineering support for Raffaello, along with NASA, Boeing and the Italian Space Agency. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello will undergo testing. joining the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, also in the SSPF. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 on July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1028

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers from the Italian aerospace company Alenia Aerospazio begin removing the protective cover from the Multi-Purpose Logistics M... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers on the floor oversee the transfer of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello to a workstand where it will undergo testing. Sharing the space in the SSPF is the first Italian-built MPLM, Leonardo, seen at right, and the U.S. Lab, Destiny, in the background. One of Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, the MPLM is a reusable logistics carrier and the primary delivery system used to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Weighing nearly 4.5 tons, the Raffaello measures 21 feet long and 15 feet in diameter. Raffaello is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-100 July 27, 2000 KSC-99pp1024

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside a high bay in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers on the floor oversee the transfer of the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) called Raffaello to a work... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1144

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate cla...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1143

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1145

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. And... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1149

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) ...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the ta... more

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1148

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members...

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activit... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 199...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttl... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1150

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FR... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1157

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as th... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1154

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the a...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awarenes... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1147

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronau...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlant... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1156

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the cur... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1151

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut cand...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for trainin... more

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1152

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shut...

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activiti... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1153

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about t...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for trai... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment d... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1161

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment du... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment du... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1158

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, in... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equip... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1159

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in tra... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1172

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During t... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1171

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot... more

STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) on equipment for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1428

STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Spa...

STS-102 crew members at left are briefed by workers (right) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) on equipment for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usa... more

STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), pose in front of the U.S. Lab module, named Destiny, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1429

STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, ...

STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA), pose in front of the U.S. Lab module, named Destiny, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). S... more

Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (right) explains use of the equipment in front of (left) STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian Space Agency (RSA). STS-102 is a resupply mission to the International Space Station, transporting the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) with equipment to assist in outfitting the U.S. Lab, which will already be in place. The mission is also transporting Helms, Voss and Usachev as the second resident crew (designated Expedition crew 2) to the station. In exchange, the mission will return to Earth the first expedition crew on ISS: William Shepherd, Sergei Krikalev (RSA) and Yuri Gidzenko (RSA). STS-102 is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 19, 2000 KSC-99pp1427

Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (rig...

Inside the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), a technician (right) explains use of the equipment in front of (left) STS-102 Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yuri Usachev, with the Russian ... more

Inside a darkened U.S. Lab module, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), astronaut James Voss (left) joins STS-98 crew members Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell (foreground), and Pilot Mark Polansky (right) to check out equipment in the Lab. They are taking part in a Multi-Equipment Interface Test (MEIT) on this significant element of the International Space Station. Also participating in the MEIT is STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Jones (Ph.D.). Voss is assigned to mission STS-102 as part of the second crew to occupy the International Space Station. During the STS-98 mission, the crew will install the Lab on the station during a series of three space walks. The mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Laboratory Module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. The Lab is planned for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on the sixth ISS flight, currently targeted no earlier than Aug. 19, 2000 KSC-00pp0184

Inside a darkened U.S. Lab module, in the Space Station Processing Fac...

Inside a darkened U.S. Lab module, in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), astronaut James Voss (left) joins STS-98 crew members Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell (foreground), and Pilot Mark Polansky (rig... more

The Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) appears overflowing with racks and wires being used to support work on elements of the International Space Station. Currently housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab Destiny and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Leonardo and Raffaello. Destiny, element 5A of the station, is scheduled for launch on mission STS-98 in August; Leonardo, element 5A.1, on mission STS-102 in October; and Raffaello, element 6A, on mission STS-100 in November KSC-00pp0183

The Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) appears overflowing with ...

The Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) appears overflowing with racks and wires being used to support work on elements of the International Space Station. Currently housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab Des... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab, Destiny; the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo; and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC00pp0300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. Elsewhere in the SSPF are also the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the Space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC00pp0301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the cente...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. El... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed in the SSPF are the U.S. Lab, Destiny; the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo; and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC-00pp0300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A rack of four gyroscopes is part of the hardware and equipment filling the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Other elements of the International Space Station also housed ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. Elsewhere in the SSPF are also the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). The PMA-3 is the first element scheduled to be launched to the Space Station, on STS-92. Next is Destiny, on STS-98, followed by the MPLMs on STS-102 and STS-100. No dates have been determined yet for these missions KSC-00pp0301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the cente...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Lab Destiny dominates the center of the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), which is filled with other hardware and equipment for the International Space Station. El... more

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) move a high-gain antenna for installation onto the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, already in the SSPF. The Z1 is an early exterior framework for the International Space Station that will allow the first U.S. solar arrays, on mission STS-97, flight 4A, to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. The Z1 is a payload scheduled on mission STS-92, the fifth flight to the Space Station, in the fall KSC-00pp0766

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) move a high-ga...

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) move a high-gain antenna for installation onto the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, already in the SSPF. The Z1 is an early exterior framework for the... more

On the scaffolding in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF), STS-92 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria leans over to get a better look at the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1 below. The Z1 is a payload scheduled on mission STS-92, the fifth flight to the Space Station, in the fall. The Z1 is an early exterior framework for the International Space Station, and will allow the first U.S. solar arrays, on mission STS-97, flight 4A, to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power KSC-00pp0769

On the scaffolding in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF), ST...

On the scaffolding in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF), STS-92 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria leans over to get a better look at the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1 below. The Z1 is a ... more

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) are getting ready to prepare the high-gain antenna beside them on the floor for installation on the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, just beyond the scaffolding. The Z1 is an early exterior framework for the International Space Station to allow the first U.S. solar arrays, on mission STS-97, flight 4A, to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. The Z1 is a payload scheduled on mission STS-92, the fifth flight to the Space Station, in the fall KSC-00pp0767

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) are getting re...

Workers in the Space Shuttle Processing Facility (SSPF) are getting ready to prepare the high-gain antenna beside them on the floor for installation on the Integrated Truss Structure (ITS) Z1, just beyond the s... more