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Ed White performs first U.S. spacewalk

Ed White performs first U.S. spacewalk

(June 3, 1965) Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot for the Gemini-Titan 4 space flight, floats in space during America’s first spacewalk. The extravehicular activity (EVA) was performed during the Gemini 4 miss... more

Ed White First American Spacewalker

Ed White First American Spacewalker

(June 3, 1965) Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go, effectively setting himself adrift in the zero gravity of space. For 23 minutes White floated and maneuvere... more

Ed White First American Spacewalker

Ed White First American Spacewalker

On June 3, 1965 Edward H. White II became the first American to step outside his spacecraft and let go, effectively setting himself adrift in the zero gravity of space. For 23 minutes White floated and maneuver... more

President Johnson Congratulates Astronauts

President Johnson Congratulates Astronauts

(June 14, 1965) President Lyndon Johnson shows off photos of astronaut Edward H. White II during his historic "space walk" extravehicular activity (EVA) on the Gemini 4 flight. Major participants from left to r... more

White Earth Limb

White Earth Limb

Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini 4 spacecraft, floats in the zero gravity of space with an earth limb backdrop. The extravehicular activity was performed during the third revolution of the Gemini 4 space... more

Astronaut James A. McDivitt Suited in Preparation for Training Tests

Astronaut James A. McDivitt Suited in Preparation for Training Tests

(May 21, 1965) Astronaut James A. McDivitt, commander of Gemini IV, suited in preparation for weight and balance tests. The objective of the Gemini IV mission was to evaluate and test the effects of four days i... more

White Floats out the Open Hatch

White Floats out the Open Hatch

Astronaut Edward H. White II, pilot for the Gemini-Titan 4 space flight, floats in zero gravity of space. The extravehicular activity was performed during the third revolution of the Gemini 4 spacecraft. White ... more

Aldrin Performs EVA

Aldrin Performs EVA

Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot of the Gemini 12 spacecraft performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the second day of the four day mission in space. Aldrin is positioned next to the Agena work station...Image ... more

Gemini 9 and Earth Limb

Gemini 9 and Earth Limb

An unusual view of the Gemini 9 spacecraft taken by Eugene Cernan during his Extravehicular Activity (EVA). His umbilical and spacecraft are visible though he is not...Image # : S66-37989

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. -- At Cape Kennedy Air Force Station in Florida, Gemini 8 lifts off atop a Titan II rocket with command pilot Neil A. Armstrong and pilot David R. Scott aboard. They plan to rendezvous and dock with an Agena target satellite and Scott will perform a spacewalk. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-66PC-0038

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. -- At Cape Kennedy Air Force Station in Florida, Ge...

CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. -- At Cape Kennedy Air Force Station in Florida, Gemini 8 lifts off atop a Titan II rocket with command pilot Neil A. Armstrong and pilot David R. Scott aboard. They plan to rendezvous and do... more

Spider Over The Ocean

Spider Over The Ocean

(March 7, 1969) View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module "Spider," in a lunar landing configuration, as photographed form the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The landing ... more

Schweickart On "The Porch"

Schweickart On "The Porch"

(March 6, 1969) Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, Lunar Module pilot, stands in "golden slippers" on the Lunar Module "Spider's" porch during his extravehicular activity on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 earth-... more

Hubble First Servicing EVA

Hubble First Servicing EVA

Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, anchored on the end of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, prepares to be elevated to the top of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to install protective covers on the magnetomet... more

Apollo 14 Crew Training

Apollo 14 Crew Training

(December 8, 1970) The Apollo 14 crew trains to conduct the lunar extravehicular activity (EVA), or spacewalk...Image # : 70P-0503

EVAtion

EVAtion

Mission Specialist Bruce McCandless II, is seen further away from the confines and safety of his ship than any previous astronaut had ever been. This space first was made possible by the Manned Manuevering Unit... more

McCandless on Arm in Aft Payload B

McCandless on Arm in Aft Payload B

S84-27039: Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, STS-41B mission specialist, tests a Mobile Foot Restraint (MFR) attached to the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger. McCandless appears ... more

McCandless with Space Screw Gun

McCandless with Space Screw Gun

S84-27036: EVA Astronaut Bruce McCandless II, is using a special power tool to conduct an experiment. His feet are anchored in the mobile foot restraints, which are connected to the Remote Manipulator System's ... more

Structures in Space

Structures in Space

Astronaut Jerry L. Ross, anchored to the foot restraint on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), approaches the tower-like Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) device. The str... more

Bruce McCandless on mid-deck

Bruce McCandless on mid-deck

(April 25, 1990) STS-31 Mission Specialist Bruce McCandless II, wearing liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG), works his way out of the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) lower torso on the mid deck of ... more

Kathy Sullivan dons her suit

Kathy Sullivan dons her suit

(April 25, 1990) STS-31 Mission Specialist Kathryn D. Sullivan poses for a picture before donning her space suit and extravehicular mobility unit in the airlock of Discovery. Onboard the April 25, 1990 shuttle ... more

Assembling Structures in the Payload Bay

Assembling Structures in the Payload Bay

STS-49 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn C. Thornton (foreground) releases a strut from the Multipurpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS) strut dispenser during Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity ... more

Intelsat VI Capture Attempt

Intelsat VI Capture Attempt

The first single crewmember EVA capture attempt of the Intelsat VI as seen from Endeavour's aft flight deck windows. EVA Mission Specialist Pierre Thuot standing on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) end effec... more

Armed and Ready

Armed and Ready

STS-49 Mission Specialist Pierre Thuot is perched on the end effector of the Robot Arm (Remote Manipulator System/RMS), with the Intelsat VI capture bar. This would be one of many attempts to grapple the Intels... more

Three Crew Members Capture Intelsat VI

Three Crew Members Capture Intelsat VI

Three crewmembers of mission STS-49 hold onto the 4.5 ton International Telecommunications Organization Satellite (INTELSAT) VI after a six- handed "capture" was made minutes earlier during the mission's third ... more

Low and Wisoff at Work

Low and Wisoff at Work

Description Mission Specialist (MS) Peter J.K. Wisoff (bottom), wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), works with the antenna on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) while Payload Commander (PLC) G... more

Wisoff on the Arm

Wisoff on the Arm

Against the blackness of space, Mission Specialist Peter J.K. Wisoff, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit, stands on a Portable Foot Restraint (PFR), Manipulator Foot Restrait (MFR) attached to the End Effe... more

Standing on the Edge of the Bay

Standing on the Edge of the Bay

Mission Specialist James H. Newman conducts an in-space evaluation of the Portable Foot Restraint (PFR) which will be used operationally on the first Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission and future Sh... more

Arm in Arm

Arm in Arm

Backdropped against the blue and white Earth, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low and (MS) Peter J.K. Wisoff, wearing Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs), simulate handling of larg... more

Thornton Prepares to Release Hubble Array

Thornton Prepares to Release Hubble Array

To run all their systems, satellites need a way to generate power for months, even years. Most Earth-orbiting spacecraft, like the Hubble Space Telescope, rely on solar cells to recharge their onboard batteries... more

Astronauts Musgrave and Akers suit up for final HST spacewalk

Astronauts Musgrave and Akers suit up for final HST spacewalk

STS061-38-014 (9 Dec 1993) --- Astronaut F. Story Musgrave gets assistance from astronaut Thomas D. Akers while suiting up for the final space walk on the eleven-day, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing miss... more

SAFER Tests by Meade and Lee

SAFER Tests by Meade and Lee

STS064-114-027: Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red stripe on suit) test the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles from Earth. The pair were actually performing an in-sp... more

SAFER Rescue System Tested

SAFER Rescue System Tested

Astronauts Carl J. Meade and Mark C. Lee (red strip on suit) test the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system some 130 nautical miles above Earth. The pair was actually performing an in-space rehearsal... more

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency EVA

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency ...

S94-29978 (8 March 1994) --- Astronaut Donald A. Thomas, mission specialist, prepares to be lowered into a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F).... more

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency EVA

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency ...

S94-29981 (8 March 1994) --- Astronaut Donald A. Thomas, mission specialist, awaits his helmet as he prepares to be lowered into a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Tr... more

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency EVA

STS-65 Mission Specialist Thomas in EMU prepares for WETF contingency ...

S94-29976 (8 March 1994) --- Astronaut Donald A. Thomas, mission specialist, awaits his helmet as he prepares to be lowered into a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Weightless Environment Tr... more

STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

S94-39771 (August 1994) --- Astronaut Mark C. Lee is pictured prior to the mission specialist's participation in an underwater rehearsal for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Lee's spacewalk is scheduled for th... more

STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

STS-64 Extravehicular activity (EVA) training view in WETF

S94-39774 (August 1994) --- Boeing's Kari Rueter checks the helmet of astronaut Mark C. Lee prior to the mission specialist's participation in an underwater rehearsal for an extravehicular activity (EVA). Lee's... more

Gernhardt on Robot Arm

Gernhardt on Robot Arm

The pale blue Earth serves as backdrop for astronaut Michael Gernhardt during his Extravehicular Activity (EVA). He is standing on a Manipulator Foot Restraint (MFR) attached to the Remote Manipulator System (R... more

Bernard Harris and Michael Foale prepare to leave airlo

Bernard Harris and Michael Foale prepare to leave airlo

STS-63 astronauts Bernard A. Harris, Jr., payload commander (right), and C. Michael Foale, mission specialist (left), are ready to exit Discovery's airlock for a spacewalk. The pair would test new insulation to... more

S82E5598 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency spacewalk

S82E5598 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz, seatec at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck, fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency extravehicular ac... more

S82E5019 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewalk

S82E5019 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewa...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: On Flight Day 2, Mission Specialist Greg Harbaugh checks out the Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) which he will be using during his extravehicular activity (EVA) ... more

S82E5020 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewalk

S82E5020 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewa...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: On Flight Day 2, Mission Specialist Greg Harbaugh checks out the Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) which he will be using during his extravehicular activity (EVA) ... more

S82E5597 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency spacewalk

S82E5597 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz, seatec at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck, fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency extravehicular ac... more

S82E5599 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency spacewalk

S82E5599 - STS-082 - Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: STS-82 Pilot Scott Horowitz, seatec at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck, fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency extravehicular ac... more

Robot Camera Retrieval

Robot Camera Retrieval

Looking like he's playing with a high tech "soccerball" STS-87 Mission Specialists Winston Scott reaches out and retrieves the free-flying AERCam/Sprint (Autonomous EVA Robotic Camera)...Image # : STS087-369-032

Winston Scott during EVA

Winston Scott during EVA

Mission Specialist Winston Scott as seen from inside orbiter Columbia conducts the second Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on mission STS-87...Image # : STS087-375-015

Doi in Aft Payload Bay Window

Doi in Aft Payload Bay Window

Mission Specialist Takao Doi conducts the second Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on mission STS-87. He waves at crew members inside Columbia from the aft Payload Bay windows...Image # : STS087-375-009

S82E5018 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewalk

S82E5018 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewa...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: On Flight Day 2, Mission Specialist Greg Harbaugh checks out the Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) which he will be using during his extravehicular activity (EVA) ... more

S82E5017 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewalk

S82E5017 - STS-082 - Harbaugh checks out PGT tool for upcoming spacewa...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: On Flight Day 2, Mission Specialist Greg Harbaugh checks out the Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) which he will be using during his extravehicular activity (EVA) ... more

STS-81 Mission Specialist Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff prepares for the fifth ShuttleMir docking as he waits in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building for the operation to fit him into his launch/entry suit to be completed. He conducted a spacewalk on his on his first Shuttle mission, STS57 and holds a doctorate degree in applied physics with an emphasis on lasers and semiconductor materials. He and five crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis will lift off during a 7-minute window that opens at 4:27 a.m. EST, January 12 KSC-97pc139

STS-81 Mission Specialist Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff prepares for the f...

STS-81 Mission Specialist Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff prepares for the fifth ShuttleMir docking as he waits in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building for the operation to fit him into his launch/entry suit to... more

Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency spacewalk

Pilot Scott Horowitz fashions cord loop fasteners for a contingency sp...

S82-E-5597 (17 Feb. 1997) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz at pilot's station works with a hand-fashioned loop fastener device to be used in support of the additional STS-82 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) to serv... more

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wolf confer, possibly about the Russian Space Station Mir, after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Lawrence was supposed to be the next U.S. astronaut slated for a long-duration stay aboard Mir, but was replaced by Wolf in late July. Unlike Lawrence, Wolf has undergone spacewalk training and fits in the Orlan spacesuit used by Russians on spacewalks. Lawrence will remain on the STS-86 crew, but will return to Earth at the conclusion of the planned 10-day mission. Wolf will take the place on Mir of astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived on the Russian space station during the STS-84 mission in May. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. The mission is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis KSC-97PC1344

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wo...

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at left, and David A. Wolf confer, possibly about the Russian Space Station Mir, after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown De... more

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov grins broadly for photographers after he and other crew members arrive at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. This will be the fifth spaceflight, second aboard the Space Shuttle, for Russian cosmonaut Titov, who is a colonel in the Russian Air Force. On STS-86, he will become the first non-American astronaut to perform a Shuttle-based extravehicular activity or spacewalk. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir, on which Titov spent a then-record 366 consecutive days in space in 1987-88. STS-86 is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis KSC-97PC1342

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov grins broadly for...

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov grins broadly for photographers after he and other crew members arrive at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT)... more

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, to the right of Hoggard; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Scott E. Parazynski. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to conduct a spacewalk primarily to retrieve four suitcase-sized environmental payloads from the exterior of the Mir docking module. Also during the mission, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1352

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armo...

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. G... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Scott E. Parazynski practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to perform a spacewalk during the STS-86 mission, which will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-86 is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1372

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Geo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Scott E. Parazynski practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket as p... more

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (leaning into Parazynski); Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski and Lawrence had trained to live and work aboard the Russian station but were withdrawn from Mir training Parazynski because he was "too tall" to fit safely in the Russian Soyuz vehicle, and Lawrence because she is "too short" to fit in the Russian spacewalk suit. "Just right" Wolf is scheduled to become a Mir 24 crew member after the docking, to replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale for an extended stay aboard the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1413

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, famil...

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97pc1443

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

STS-86 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets assistance from a suit technician in making adjustments to his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Parazynski’s second flight. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski is scheduled to perform a spacewalk during the docking KSC-97PC1422

STS-86 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets assistance from a s...

STS-86 Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski gets assistance from a suit technician in making adjustments to his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Parazynski’s second ... more

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists (and their nicknames for this flight) are, from left, "too tall" Scott E. Parazynski, "just right" David A. Wolf and "too short" Wendy B. Lawrence. The two mission specialists representing foreign space agencies are Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, in foreground at right, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, in background at right. Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield are out of the frame. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. Parazynski and Lawrence were withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir Parazynski because he was too tall to fit safely in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, and Lawrence because she was too short to fit into a Russian spacewalk suit. The crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the planned 10-day mission KSC-97PC1428

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press represe...

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1429

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1444

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a "thumbs up" to show she’s ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrence’s second spaceflight. She and the six other crew members will depart shortly from the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A, where Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Lawrence was given the nickname "too short," as shown on her orange spacesuit, because she was withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir when it was determined that she was too short to fit into the Russian spacewalk suit. Lawrence remains a member of the STS-86 crew, but fellow Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will take her place for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station KSC-97PC1425

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wen...

After donning her launch and entry suit, STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence gives a "thumbs up" to show she’s ready to fly in a few hours on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. This will be Lawrence’s second s... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1430

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1442

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1434

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1445

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1433

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

A suit technician makes adjustments to the orange launch and entry suit of STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Titov’s fifth spaceflight, and second on the Space Shuttle. He and the six other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Titov is scheduled to perform a spacewalk during the docking KSC-97PC1420

A suit technician makes adjustments to the orange launch and entry sui...

A suit technician makes adjustments to the orange launch and entry suit of STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov in the Operations and Checkout Building. This will be Titov’s fifth spaceflight, a... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1431

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, participates in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Glenda Laws, the extravehicular activity (EVA) coordinator, Johnson Space Center, stands behind Dr. Doi. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-87 will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Dr. Doi will be the first Japanese astronaut to perform a spacewalk. STS-87 is scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC KSC-97PC1514

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Dev...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, participates in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Glenda Laws, the extrave... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, participates in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC's) Vertical Processing Facility. Glenda Laws, the extravehicular activity (EVA) coordinator, Johnson Space Center, stands behind Dr. Doi. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-87 will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Dr. Doi will be the first Japanese astronaut to perform a spacewalk. STS-87 is scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC KSC-97PC1487

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Dev...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi , Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, participates in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC's) Vertical Processing F... more

STS-87 astronaut crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) with the Spartan-201 payload in Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC's) Vertical Processing Facility. From left are Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Commander Kevin Kregel; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-87 will be the fourth United States Microgravity Payload and flight of the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Dr. Doi will be the first Japanese astronaut to perform a spacewalk. STS-87 is scheduled for a Nov. 19 liftoff from KSC KSC-97PC1481

STS-87 astronaut crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Integr...

STS-87 astronaut crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) with the Spartan-201 payload in Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC's) Vertical Processing Facility. From left are Pilot Steven Li... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) can be seen in the background. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1505

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1504

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1495

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott poses in his orange launch and entry spacesuit with NASA suit technicians at Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew of the STS-87 mission is scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Scott will be performing an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk during the mission. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight providing the crew of each mission opportunities to participate in simulated countdown activities. The TCDT ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cut-off. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the pad and has an opportunity to view and inspect the payloads in the orbiter's payload bay KSC-97PC1624

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott poses in his orange launch and...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott poses in his orange launch and entry spacesuit with NASA suit technicians at Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew of th... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, gives a ‘thumbs up’ in his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. He and the five other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Dr. Doi is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Winston Scott during STS-87 KSC-97PC1678

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Deve...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, gives a ‘thumbs up’ in his launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. He and the five other cre... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1696

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Scott’s second space flight. He and the five other crew members will depart shortly for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff on a 16-day mission to perform microgravity and solar research. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. He also performed a spacewalk on STS-72 KSC-97PC1677

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott dons his launch and entry suit with the assistance of a suit technician in the Operations and Checkout Building. This is Scott’s second space flight. He and the five othe... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit by Dave Law, USA mechanical technician, in the white room at Launch Pad 39B as Dr. Doi prepares to enter the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia on launch day. At right wearing glasses is Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. The 16-day mission will include a spacewalk by Dr. Doi and Mission Specialist Winston Scott KSC-97PC1703

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Deve...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit by Dave Law, USA mechanical technician, in the white room at L... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1692

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1700

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1701

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1698

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1694

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1699

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1695

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1697

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 satellite. The crew members include Mission Commander Kevin Kregel.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., Winston Scott, and Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. During the 16-day STS-87 mission, the crew will oversee experiments in microgravity; deploy and retrieve a solar satellite; and test a new experimental camera, the AERCam Sprint. Dr. Doi and Scott also will perform a spacewalk to practice International Space Station maneuvers KSC-97PC1691

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Col...

Like a rising sun lighting up the afternoon sky, the Space Shuttle Columbia soars from Launch Pad 39B at 2:46:00 p.m. EST, November 19, on the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan... more

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. Scott also performed a spacewalk on the STS-72 mission KSC-97PC1707

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott is assisted with his ascent an...

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of... more

Large ORU/ Crane evaluations conducted during first EVA of STS-87 (DTO 671)

Large ORU/ Crane evaluations conducted during first EVA of STS-87 (DTO...

STS087-718-069 (19 November ? 5 December 1997) --- On the Space Shuttle Columbia's first ever spacewalk (EVA), astronaut Takao Doi works with a 156-pound crane carried onboard for the first time this trip of Co... more

Large ORU/ Crane evaluations conducted during first EVA of STS-87 (DTO 671)

Large ORU/ Crane evaluations conducted during first EVA of STS-87 (DTO...

STS087-718-073 (19 November ? 5 December 1997) --- On the Space Shuttle Columbia's first ever spacewalk (EVA), astronaut Winston E. Scott works with a simulated battery and 156-pound crane carried onboard for t... more

Newman Waves at Camera from Unity Module

Newman Waves at Camera from Unity Module

STS-88 mission specialist James Newman, holding on to a handrail, waves back at the camera during the first of three Extravehicular activities(EVAs) performed during the mission. The orbiter can be seen reflect... more