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204 media by topicpage 1 of 3
Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

Constructed in 1964, the S-IC Static Test Stand was designed to develop and test the first stage (S-IC) of the Saturn V launch vehicle. In the 1974 the test stand was modified to test the liquid hydrogen tank o... more

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A workman reams holes to the proper size and aligment in the Space Shuttle Main Engine's main injector body, through which propellants will pass through on their way into the engine's combustion chamber. Rockwe... more

Sen. John C. Stennis celebrates a successful Space Shuttle Main Engine test

Sen. John C. Stennis celebrates a successful Space Shuttle Main Engine...

Description: (August 23, 1978) Sen. John C. Stennis dances a jig on top of the Test Control Center at Stennis Space Center following the successful test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine in 1978. A staunch support... more

Space Shuttle Main Engine Hoisted into Test Stand

Space Shuttle Main Engine Hoisted into Test Stand

(1979) A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is hoisted into the A-2 Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center before undergoing a test firing.

Firing in the Fog

Firing in the Fog

An eerie layer of fog surrounds the A-1 Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi as a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is test fired.

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

A cloud of extremely hot steam boils out of the flame deflector at the A-1 test stand during a test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) at the John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi.

Space Shuttle Main Engine Maintenance

Space Shuttle Main Engine Maintenance

A technician performs maintenance on a Space Shuttle Main Engine, (SSME) to prepare it for testing at the John C. Stennis Space Center.

Night Time Test Firing

Night Time Test Firing

A Space Shuttle Main Engine, (SSME) test firing lights up the night sky at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi. This test occurred on the B-1, SSC's largest of three test stands used... more

Thermal Image Test of Space Shuttle Main Engine

Thermal Image Test of Space Shuttle Main Engine

Thermal imaging is part of ongoing technology development research at the John C. Stennis Space Center. A thermal image of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) during a test firing detects eroding baffling eviden... more

Stennis Propulsion Test Complex

Stennis Propulsion Test Complex

Pictured is the John C. Stennis Space Center's propulsion testing complex. In the foreground is the center's largest Test Stand the B-1, along with the A-2 and A-1 stands. These test stands are used to test the... more

Thermal Image Test of Space Shuttle Main Engine

Thermal Image Test of Space Shuttle Main Engine

Thermal imaging is part of ongoing technology development research at the John C. Stennis Space Center. A thermal image of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) during a test firing detects eroding baffling eviden... more

H-1 Test Facility

H-1 Test Facility

Pictured is the H-1 Test Facility at the John C. Stennis Space Center. It is here that testing of hybrid rocket motors are taking place. In the background is the Space Shuttle Main Engine test complex with its ... more

NASA Tugboat Ferries Liquid Oxygen

NASA Tugboat Ferries Liquid Oxygen

The NASA tugboat transports liquid oxygen to the base of the B-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Stennis is NASA's facility for testing all Space Shuttle Main Engines before flight. Liquid hydrogen and liqu... more

A-1 Test Stand Night Firing

A-1 Test Stand Night Firing

The conclusion of a test firing on the A-1 Test Stand illuminates the night sky at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi. The A-1 is one of three Test Stands at Stennis used for testin... more

Inside the Test Control Center

Inside the Test Control Center

Technicians inside the Test Control Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center monitor a Space Shuttle Main Engine test firing.

Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Test Firing

Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Test Firing

(May 21, 1981) A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) undergoing a full power level 290.04 second test firing at the National Space Technology Laboratories (currently called the Stennis Space Center) in Mississippi... more

Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

(1981) A remote camera captures a close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a test firing at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A Space Shuttle Main Engine undergoes test-firing at the National Space Technology Laboratories (now the Sternis Space Center) in Mississippi. The Marshall Space Flight Center had management responsibility of S... more

View of the Flight Readiness Firing (FRF) of the Challengers engines

View of the Flight Readiness Firing (FRF) of the Challengers engines

The Space shuttle orbiter Challenger is given a 20-second test firing of its new main engines on December 18, 1982 on pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. This test was the first time these engines ahd been tes... more

Shuttle Engine - Out Test

Shuttle Engine - Out Test

(May 18, 1988) This is a test of what happens during launch if a Space Shuttle Main Engine fails. The test was conducted at what is now called the John H. Glenn Research Center.

STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, SSME (2019) installed in position number one at KSC

STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, SSME (2019) installed in position number one...

S88-29076 (10 Jan 1988) --- KSC employees work together to carefully guide a 7,000 pound main engine into the number one position in Discovery's aft compartment. Because of the engine's weight and size, specia... more

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rollover at KSC

STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rollover at KSC

S88-42092 (15 July 1988) --- STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rollover at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is closely monitored by engineers and technicians in the late stages of the move from the orbiter ... more

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Atlantis takes flight on its STS-27 mission, December 2, 1988, utilizing 375,000 pounds of thrust produced by its three main engines. The engines start in 3.9 seconds of ignition and go to static ... more

Early Program Development

Early Program Development

In this 1989 artist's concept, the Shuttle-C floats in space with its cargo bay doors open. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the Shuttle-C would be an unmanned heavy lift cargo vehicle de... more

Early Program Development

Early Program Development

This 1989 artist's rendering shows how a Shuttle-C would look during launch. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the Shuttle-C would be an unmanned heavy-lift cargo vehicle derived from Spac... more

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A modified Space Shuttle Main Engine is static fired at Marshall's Technology Test Bed.

STS-36 Atlantis, OV-104, glides above EAFB Runway 23 prior to landing

STS-36 Atlantis, OV-104, glides above EAFB Runway 23 prior to landing

STS-36 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed glides above Runway 23 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California prior to touchdown. ... more

STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete runway 22

STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, lands on EAFB concrete run...

STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rolls along concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, after nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) touchdown. This view looks down... more

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) - hot and cold cycles turbine blade test firing.

STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California

STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, glides over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, Cali...

STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, glides over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A modified Space Shuttle Main Engine is static fired at Marshall's Technology Test Bed.

STS-45 Atlantis, OV-104, begins its roll maneuver after liftoff from KSC

STS-45 Atlantis, OV-104, begins its roll maneuver after liftoff from K...

STS045-S-053 (24 March 1992) --- A low-angle view of the Space Shuttle Atlantis as it soars off the launch pad and heads toward Earth orbit with a crew of seven and the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications a... more

STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lifts off from KSC LC Pad 39B

STS-49 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lifts off from KSC LC Pad ...

STS049-S-251 (7 May 1992) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour soars toward Earth orbit where a crew of seven NASA astronauts will spend at least a week. Endeavour, the newest orbiter in NASA's Space Shuttle fleet, ... more

STS-49 Endeavour, OV-105, drag chute deployment during landing at EAFB, Calif

STS-49 Endeavour, OV-105, drag chute deployment during landing at EAFB...

STS049-S-301 (16 May 1992) --- A three-quarter aft view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour making its first landing, following a successful nine-day mission in Earth orbit. Fully deployed here is the main chute in... more

STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rises into sky after KSC liftoff

STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rises into sky after KSC l...

STS053-S-058 (2 Dec. 1992) --- The space shuttle Discovery, with a crew of five astronauts onboard, launches from Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Pad 39A at 8:24:00 a.m. (EST), Dec. 2, 1992. The all military crew ... more

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC's SLF

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC'...

STS054-S-100 (19 Jan 1993) --- The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Endeavour rolls toward wheelstop at KSC's Shuttle landing facility. Landing occurred at 8:38 a.m. (EST), Jan. 19, 1993. Onbo... more

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC's SLF

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC'...

STS054-S-101 (19 Jan 1993) --- The drag chute is just about to be released as the Space Shuttle Endeavour rolls toward wheelstop at KSC's Shuttle landing facility. Landing occurred at 8:38 a.m. (EST), Jan. 19, ... more

STS-56 Discovery, OV-103, lifts off from KSC LC Pad 39B into darkness

STS-56 Discovery, OV-103, lifts off from KSC LC Pad 39B into darkness

STS-56 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, riding atop its external tank (ET) and flanked by two solid rocket boosters (SRBs), lifts off from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B into the ear... more

Space Shuttle Project

Space Shuttle Project

A modified Space Shuttle Main Engine is static fired at Marshall's Technology Test Bed.

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

On the 25th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 (the first moon landing mission) launch, Marshall Space & Flight Center celebrated with a test firing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) at the Technology Test Bed ... more

STS-65 Columbia, OV-102, lifts off from KSC Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A

STS-65 Columbia, OV-102, lifts off from KSC Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39...

STS065-S-048 (8 July 1994) --- The Space Shuttle Columbia, with six NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist aboard, heads toward Earth-orbit. A short time later, the crew began setting up the science... more

Around Marshall

Around Marshall

On the 25th Anniversary of the Apollo-11 space launch, Marshall celebrated with a test firing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine at the Technology Test Bed (SSME-TTB). This drew a large crowd who stood in the fie... more

S47-28-008 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-008 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

Space Shuttle Main Engine Maintenance

Space Shuttle Main Engine Maintenance

(1995) A technician performs maintenance on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in building 3202 in preparation for a test firing at the John C.Stennis Space Center.

S47-28-004 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-004 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

S47-28-003 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-003 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

S47-28-002 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-002 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

Shuttle Main Engine Firing in Gimbal Test

Shuttle Main Engine Firing in Gimbal Test

(1995) A close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a test at the John C. Stennis Space Center shows how the engine is gimballed, or rotated to evaluate the performance of its components under simulate... more

S47-28-001 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-001 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

S47-28-006 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-006 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

S47-28-005 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minutes after SSME cutoff

S47-28-005 - STS-047 - Pilot Brown and Commander Gibson about 10 minut...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Pilot Curtis Brown and Commander Robert Gibson on launch day of STS-47 in orbiter Endeavour. Views include: Brown at pilot... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) No. 2036, the first of the new Block 1 engines to fly,  awaits installation into position one of the orbiter Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility 2 during preparation of the spaceplane for the STS-70 mission.  The advanced powerplant features a new high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump, a two-duct powerhead, a baffleless main injector, a single-coil heat exchanger and start sequence modifications.  These modifications are designed to improve both engine performance and safety. KSC-95pc586

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) No. 203...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) No. 2036, the first of the new Block 1 engines to fly, awaits installation into position one of the orbiter Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facili... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hoist prepares to lift the first Block 1 engine to be installed in an orbiter into the number one position on Discovery while the spaceplane is being prepared for the STS-70 mission in the high bay of Orbiter Processing Facility 2.  The new engine, SSME No. 2036, features a new high-pressure liquid oxygen turbopump, a two-duct powerhead, a baffleless main injector, a single-coil heat exchanger and start sequence modifications.  The other two main engines to be used during the liftoff of the STS-70 mission are of the existing Phase II design. KSC-95PC585

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hoist...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hoist prepares to lift the first Block 1 engine to be installed in an orbiter into the number one position on Discovery while the spaceplane is b... more

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) gather to talk inside the facility following the ceremony. From left, they are Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing; KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; John Plowden, vice president of Rocketdyne; and Donald R. McMonagle, manager of Launch Integration. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc785

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Sp...

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) gather to talk inside the facility following the ceremony. From left, they are Robert B... more

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon (holding scissors) cut the ribbon at a ceremony on July 6 to open KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF). Joining in the ribbon cutting are (left) Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations of United Space Alliance; Marvin L. Jones, director of Installation Operations; Donald R. McMonagle, manager of Launch Integration; (right) Wade Ivey of Ivey Construction, Inc.; Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing; and John Plowden, vice president of Rocketdyne. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc783

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldo...

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon (holding scissors) cut the ribbon at a ceremony on July 6 to open KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facili... more

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) pose in front of a Space Shuttle Main Engine on display for the ceremony. From left, they are Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations of United Space Alliance; John Plowden, vice president of Rocketdyne; Donald R. McMonagle, manager of Launch Integration; U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; Wade Ivey of Ivey Construction, Inc.; and Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc784

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Sp...

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) pose in front of a Space Shuttle Main Engine on display for the ceremony. From left, th... more

James W. Tibble (pointing at engine), an Engine Systems/Ground Support Equipment team manager for Rocketdyne, discusses the operation of a Space Shuttle Main Engine with Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing; U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; and KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. Following the ribbon cutting ceremony for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), KSC employees and media explored the facility. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc786

James W. Tibble (pointing at engine), an Engine Systems/Ground Support...

James W. Tibble (pointing at engine), an Engine Systems/Ground Support Equipment team manager for Rocketdyne, discusses the operation of a Space Shuttle Main Engine with Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Pro... more

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new Block 2A engine sits on the transport cradle before being moved to the workstand. The engine is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-88 mission in December 1998. The SSMEPF officially opened on July 6, replacing the Shuttle Main Engine Shop KSC-98pc927

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new B...

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new Block 2A engine sits on the transport cradle before being moved to the workstand. The engine is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavo... more

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new Block 2A engine sits on the workstand as technicians process it. The engine is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-88 mission in December 1998. The SSMEPF officially opened on July 6, replacing the Shuttle Main Engine Shop KSC-98pc928

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new B...

In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF), a new Block 2A engine sits on the workstand as technicians process it. The engine is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS... more

A new Block 2A engine awaits processing in the low bay of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF). Officially opened on July 6, the new facility replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop. The SSMEPF is an addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The engine is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc926

A new Block 2A engine awaits processing in the low bay of the Space Sh...

A new Block 2A engine awaits processing in the low bay of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF). Officially opened on July 6, the new facility replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop. The SSM... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 199...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttl... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1154

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the a...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awarenes... more

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1152

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shut...

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activiti... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1153

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about t...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for trai... more

Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing

Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing

A new NASA Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) roars to the approval of more than 2,000 people who came to John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on July 25 for a flight-certification test of the S... more

S09-206-4478 - STS-009 - Payload bay

S09-206-4478 - STS-009 - Payload bay

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing the upper portion of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Subject Terms: PAYLOAD BAY, SPACELAB, STS-9, COLUMBIA (ORBI... more

Public views evening engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

Public views evening engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

Over the past year, more than 20,000 people came to Stennis Space Center to witness the 'shake, rattle and roar' of one of the world's most sophisticated engines. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi is NA... more

Thousands gather to watch a Space Shuttle Main Engine Test

Thousands gather to watch a Space Shuttle Main Engine Test

Approximately 13,000 people fill the grounds at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center for the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. The test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anni... more

First-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

First-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

Thousands of people watch the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. The spectacular test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary cel... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) sits in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility. The new engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0890

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (b...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) sits in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility. The new engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbit... more

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility prepare a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) for its move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. The engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle. <font KSC-01pp0895

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility prepare a...

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility prepare a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) for its move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. The engine will be installed for its first ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mike Cosgrove (front) and Bob Petrie (behind), both with Boeing/Rocketdyne, look over the upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) as it sits in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility. The new engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0892

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mike Cosgrove (front) and Bob Petrie (be...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Mike Cosgrove (front) and Bob Petrie (behind), both with Boeing/Rocketdyne, look over the upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) as it sits in the Space Shuttle Main E... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking over the upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility are Bob Petrie (left) and Mike Cosgrove (right). Both are with Boeing/Rocketdyne. The new engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0893

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking over the upgraded Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking over the upgraded Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility are Bob Petrie (left) and Mike Cosgrove (right). Both are ... more

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. There it will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0899

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to...

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. There it will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine, situated on a giant forklift, is moved toward the aft of Atlantis where it will be installed. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The engine will have its first flight on mission STS-104, scheduled for launch June 14. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0905

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine, situated on a gian...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine, situated on a giant forklift, is moved toward the aft of Atlantis where it will be installed. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3.... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The new block 2 engine for the orbiter Atlantis is moved into place next to the other two engines. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The engine will have its first flight on mission STS-104, scheduled for launch June 14. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0907

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The new block 2 engine for the orbiter A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The new block 2 engine for the orbiter Atlantis is moved into place next to the other two engines. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The engine will ... more

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility oversee the movement of a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) toward the transport vehicle in the foreground. The engine will be moved to the Orbiter Processing Facility and installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle. <font KSC-01pp0897

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility oversee t...

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility oversee the movement of a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) toward the transport vehicle in the foreground. The engine will be moved to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the giant forklift moves closer to Atlantis, workers keep watch as the new block 2 engine nears its installation point. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The engine will have its first flight on mission STS-104, scheduled for launch June 14. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0906

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the giant forklift moves closer to At...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the giant forklift moves closer to Atlantis, workers keep watch as the new block 2 engine nears its installation point. The work is being done in the Orbiter Processing Facility... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new block 2 engine arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. There the new engine will be installed on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104, for its first flight. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new blo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new block 2 engine arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. There the new engine will be installed on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new block 2 engine leaves the Space Station Main Engine Processing Facility for a short trip to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The new engine will be installed on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104, for its first flight. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0901

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new blo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The transport vehicle carrying a new block 2 engine leaves the Space Station Main Engine Processing Facility for a short trip to Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. The new engine w... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine heads toward Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. There the new engine will be installed for its first flight on Atlantis, for mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0903

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine heads toward Atlant...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A new block 2 engine heads toward Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. There the new engine will be installed for its first flight on Atlantis, for mission STS-104. The B... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility oversee lifting a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) off its stand. The engine will be moved to the Orbiter Processing Facility and installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0896

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility oversee lifting a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) off its stand. The engine will be moved to the Orbiter... more

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility get a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) ready to move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. The engine will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0894

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility get a new...

Workers in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility get a new Space Shuttle main engine (block 2 engine) ready to move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. The engine will be installed for its first fli... more

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. There it will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II Main Engine configuration is manufactured by Boeing Rocketdyne in Canoga Park, Calif., and includes a new Pratt & Whitney high-pressure fuel turbo pump. Engine improvements are managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine is 14 feet (4.3 meters) long, weighs about 7,000 pounds (3,175 kilograms), and is 7.5 feet (2.3 meters) in diameter at the end of the nozzle KSC-01pp0898

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to...

A new block 2 engine is lowered onto a transport vehicle for a move to the Orbiter Processing Facility. There it will be installed for its first flight on the orbiter Atlantis, on mission STS-104. The Block II ... more

Orbiter Atlantis (STS-110) Launch With New Block II Engines

Orbiter Atlantis (STS-110) Launch With New Block II Engines

Full Description: Powered by three newly-enhanced Space Shuttle Maine Engines (SSMEs), called the Block II Maine Engines, the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center launch pad o... more

SSME test on the A-1 Test Stand

SSME test on the A-1 Test Stand

This close-up photo was taken during testing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The test was conducted June 19, 2003.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  John Macke (standing, center), with Boeing St. Louis, Alden Pitard (seated, left) and Dan Clark (right), with KSC Boeing, check results after 3D digital scanning of actuators in the Orbiter Processing Facility.  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Macke (standing, center), with Boei...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Macke (standing, center), with Boeing St. Louis, Alden Pitard (seated, left) and Dan Clark (right), with KSC Boeing, check results after 3D digital scanning of actuators in th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Boeing worker Alden Pitard looks at a 3D digital scan of an actuator.  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Boei...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Boeing worker Alden Pitard looks at a 3D digital scan of an actuator. There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility,  Dan Clark, with KSC Boeing, operates the camera for a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table.  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Dan ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Dan Clark, with KSC Boeing, operates the camera for a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table. There are two actuators per engine on the S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  John Macke (standing, left), with Boeing St. Louis, Alden Pitard (seated, left) and Dan Clark (right), with KSC Boeing, look at a monitor after 3D digital scanning of actuators in the Orbiter Processing Facility.  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Macke (standing, left), with Boeing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - John Macke (standing, left), with Boeing St. Louis, Alden Pitard (seated, left) and Dan Clark (right), with KSC Boeing, look at a monitor after 3D digital scanning of actuators in ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Boeing workers get ready to perform a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table.  At left is John Macke, from Boeing, St. Louis.   At right is Dan Clark.. There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Boeing workers get ready to perform a 3...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Boeing workers get ready to perform a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table. At left is John Macke, from Boeing, St. Louis. At right is Dan Clark.. There are two actuato... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an actuator is set up on a table for a 3D digital scan.  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an ac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility, an actuator is set up on a table for a 3D digital scan. There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Boeing workers perform a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table.  At left is Dan Clark.  At right are Alden Pitard (seated at computer) and  John Macke, from Boeing, St. Louis.  .  There are two actuators per engine on the Shuttle, one for pitch motion and one for yaw motion. The Space Shuttle Main Engine hydraulic servoactuators are used to gimbal the main engine.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Boeing workers perform a 3D digital scan ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Boeing workers perform a 3D digital scan of the actuator on the table. At left is Dan Clark. At right are Alden Pitard (seated at computer) and John Macke, from Boeing, St. Louis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians lift SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. The engine is being lifted from its vertical work stand into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1643

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians lift SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. The engine is being lifted from its... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne quality inspector Nick Grimm (center) monitors the work of technicians on his team as they lower SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC, onto an engine stand. The engine is being placed into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1648

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne quality inspector Nick Grimm (center) monitors the work of technicians on his team as they lower SSME ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians prepare to move SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. Move conductor Bob Brackett (on ladder) supervises the placement of a sling around the engine with the assistance of crane operator Joe Ferrante (center) and a technician. The engine will be lifted from its vertical work stand into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1641

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians prepare to move SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. Move conductor Bob Brack... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians lower SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC, onto an engine stand. The engine is being moved from its vertical work stand into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1647

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians lower SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC, onto an engine stand. The engine i... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne move conductor Bob Brackett (center) oversees the work of technicians on his team as they remove the crane used to lift SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC, from its vertical work stand. The engine has been placed into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1650

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne move conductor Bob Brackett (center) oversees the work of technicians on his team as they remove the c... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians prepare to move SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. Move conductor Bob Brackett (on ladder) and technicians secure a sling around the engine under the direction of crane operator Joe Ferrante (left). The engine will be lifted from its vertical work stand into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1642

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians prepare to move SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. Move conductor Bob Brack... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians steady SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. The engine is being lifted from its vertical work stand into a horizontal position in preparation for shipment to NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi to undergo a hot fire acceptance test. It is the first of five engines to be fully assembled on site to reach the desired number of 15 engines ready for launch at any given time in the Space Shuttle program. A Space Shuttle has three reusable main engines. Each is 14 feet long, weighs about 7,800 pounds, is seven-and-a-half feet in diameter at the end of its nozzle, and generates almost 400,000 pounds of thrust. Historically, SSMEs were assembled in Canoga Park, Calif., with post-flight inspections performed at KSC.  Both functions were consolidated in February 2002. The Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power division of The Boeing Co. manufactures the engines for NASA. KSC-04pd1644

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility, Boeing-Rocketdyne technicians steady SSME 2058, the first SSME fully assembled at KSC. The engine is being lifted from i... more