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Topic: space alliance

1996
1996
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2013
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2013
478 media by topicpage 1 of 5
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, United Space Alliance (USA) technicians Dave Lawrence, at left, and James Cullop troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airlock, which failed to open during the recent STS-80 Space Shuttle mission. Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Thomas D. Jones did not perform the mission’s planned two extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks because the hatch would not open on orbit. The spacewalks were to be part of the continuing series of EVA Development Flight Tests to evaluate equipment and procedures and to build spacewalking experience in preparation for the International Space Station. KSC-96pc1341

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, Un...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, United Space Alliance (USA) technicians Dave Lawrence, at left, and James Cullop troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airloc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airlock, which failed to open during the recent STS-80 Space Shuttle mission. Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Thomas D. Jones did not perform the mission’s planned two extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks because the hatch would not open on orbit. The spacewalks were to be part of the continuing series of EVA Development Flight Tests to evaluate equipment and procedures and to build spacewalking experience in preparation for the International Space Station. KSC-96pc1343

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airlock, which failed to open during the recent ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airlock, which failed to open during the recent STS-80 Space Shuttle mission. Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan and Thomas D. Jones did not perform the mission’s planned two extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks because the hatch would not open on orbit. The spacewalks were to be part of the continuing series of EVA Development Flight Tests to evaluate equipment and procedures and to build spacewalking experience in preparation for the International Space Station. KSC-96pc1342

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- United Space Alliance (USA) technicians in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 troubleshoot the orbiter Columbia’s outer hatch of the airlock, which failed to open during the recent ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance (USA) workers J.D. Wise, left, and Robert Shackelford, with drill, try to stop an approximately 24-foot-long crack from getting any bigger on the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP), which is holding the Space Shuttle Discovery en route to Launch Pad 39A for the STS-82 mission. Discovery was on its way out to the launch pad when engineers heard a loud bang and noticed that a crack had developed on the MLP. Rollout had begun shortly after 7 a.m. EST and was stopped at about 8:25 a.m.  This Y-shaped crack is on the MLP surface and runs from near the left-hand solid rocket booster flame hole toward the near corner of the MLP.  Rollout of Discovery resumed just past noon after structural engineers determined that the integrity of the MLP had not been compromised.  Discovery is scheduled to lift off on the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission on Feb. 11.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance (USA) workers J.D....

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance (USA) workers J.D. Wise, left, and Robert Shackelford, with drill, try to stop an approximately 24-foot-long crack from getting any bigger on the Mobile Launc... more

Roy D. Bridges Jr., KSC's next center director, at right, poses in the firing room of the Launch Control Center with two top contractor officials at Kennedy Space Center during the STS-82 launch of Discovery on the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. From left, are Michael J. McCulley, vice president and associate program manager for ground operations for United Space Alliance at KSC; and Bruce Melnick, vice president of McDonnell Douglas Space and Defense Systems-KSC. Bridges is slated to become KSC's seventh center director on March 2, succeeding Jay F. Honeycutt KSC-97pc302

Roy D. Bridges Jr., KSC's next center director, at right, poses in the...

Roy D. Bridges Jr., KSC's next center director, at right, poses in the firing room of the Launch Control Center with two top contractor officials at Kennedy Space Center during the STS-82 launch of Discovery on... more

Accompanied by former astronaut Michael J. McCulley, several members of the STS-82 crew look at thermal protection system tile under the Space Shuttle Discovery on the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility shortly after the conclusion of a 10-day mission to service the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope (HST). From left to right, they are Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley; Michael J. McCulley, currently vice president and associate program manager for ground operations for the United Space Alliance at KSC; Mission Specialists Joseph R. "Joe" Tanner and Steven L. Smith (back to camera); and Payload Commander Mark C. Lee. STS-82 is the ninth Shuttle nighttime landing, and the fourth nighttime landing at KSC. The seven-member crew performed a record-tying five back-to-back extravehicular activities (EVAs) or spacewalks to service the telescope, which has been in orbit for nearly seven years. Two new scientific instruments were installed, replacing two outdated instruments. Five spacewalks also were performed on the first servicing mission, STS-61, in December 1993. Only four spacewalks were scheduled for STS-82, but a fifth one was added during the flight to install several thermal blankets over some aging insulation covering three HST compartments containing key data processing, electronics and scientific instrument telemetry packages. STS-82 was the 82nd Space Shuttle flight and the second mission of 1997 KSC-97pc355

Accompanied by former astronaut Michael J. McCulley, several members o...

Accompanied by former astronaut Michael J. McCulley, several members of the STS-82 crew look at thermal protection system tile under the Space Shuttle Discovery on the runway at the Shuttle Landing Facility sho... more

STS-84 crew members examine part of the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A, during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Dressed in their blue flight suits are Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, standing in foreground; and, in basket from right, Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu and Carlos I. Noriega and Commander Charles J. Precourt. Ken Clark, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA), is standing at lower left. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist Michael C. Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc744

STS-84 crew members examine part of the emergency egress system at Lau...

STS-84 crew members examine part of the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A, during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Dressed in their blue flight suits are Mission Specialist Elena... more

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A’s emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The sevenmember crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. NASA astronaut Mario Runco Jr., next to Kondakova in a blue flight suit, is assisting the crew during TCDT. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc743

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets ins...

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A’s emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew examine the Manipulator Flight Demonstraton (MFD) payload in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery during Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities for that mission.  They are (left) Mission Specialists Stephen K. Robinson and Robert L. Curbeam Jr. (right).  They are accompanied by a United Space Alliance (USA) payload technician.  The MFD is one of several payloads that will fly on the STS-85 mission.  This payload is designed to test the operational capability of the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEM RMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA), which can be seen atop its Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPES) carrier that will serve as a platform in the payload bay for the robotic arm experiment.  The arm, which will be a part of the JEM element of the Interntional Space Station, will be operated from the orbiter's aft flight deck during the 11-day mission.  Other payloads that will be aboard Discovery on this space flight include the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2) Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhhiker (IEH-2) experiments. KSC-97PC906

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew examin...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew examine the Manipulator Flight Demonstraton (MFD) payload in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery during Crew Equipment Interfac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew perform a sharp-edge inspection in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery in the space plane's payload bay during Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) activities for that mission.  They are (from left, foreground) Mission Specialists Stephen K. Robinson and Robert L. Curbeam Jr. (right).  They are accompanied by a United Space Alliance (USA) payload technician.  The Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD) payload is one of several that will fly on the STS-85 mission.  This payload is designed to test the operational capability of the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEM RMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA).  The arm, which will be a part of the JEM element of the Interntional Space Station, will be operated from the orbiter's aft flight deck during the 11-day mission.  Other payloads that will be aboard Discovery on this space flight include the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2) Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhhiker (IEH-2) experiments. KSC-97PC907

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew perfor...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-85 flight crew perform a sharp-edge inspection in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery in the space plane's payload bay during Crew Equipment I... more

STS-86 crew members, including Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, at center, prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. They are being assisted by Rick Welty, at left, the United Space Alliance (USA) vehicle closeout chief, and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician KSC-97PC1435

STS-86 crew members, including Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski,...

STS-86 crew members, including Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, at center, prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. They are being assisted by Rick Welty, at left, the United Space ... more

STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn KSC-97PC1436

STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prep...

STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Allianc... more

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida visits the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is briefed on hardware processing for the International Space Station by Jon Cowart, Flight 2A Manager, NASA Space Station Hardware Integration Office. In the foreground, from left to right, are Howard DeCastro, Program Manager for the Space Flight Operations Contract, United Space Alliance; Senator Bob Graham; and Jon Cowart KSC-97PC1761

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida visits the Space Station P...

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida visits the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is briefed on hardware processing for the International Space Station by Jon Cowart, Fl... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98dc751

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed. KSC-98pc754

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98pc756

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed. The other recovery vessel, Liberty Star, has undergone deck strengthening enhancements along with Freedom Star and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98pc753

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98pc757

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98dc752

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98pc758

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. This SLWT will be used to launch the orbiter Discovery on mission STS-95 in October. This first-time towing arrangement, part of a cost savings plan by NASA to prudently manage existing resources, began June 12 from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans where the Shuttle's external tanks are manufactured. The barge will now be transported up the Banana River to the LC-39 turn basin using a conventional tugboat. Previously, NASA relied on an outside contractor to provide external tank towing services at a cost of about $120,000 per trip. The new plan allows NASA's Space Flight Operations contractor, United Space Alliance (USA), to provide the same service directly to NASA using the recovery ships during their downtime between Shuttle launches. Studies show a potential savings of about $50,000 per trip. The cost of the necessary ship modifications should be paid back by the fourteenth tank delivery. The other recovery ship, Liberty Star, has also undergone deck strengthening enhancements and will soon have the necessary towing winch installed KSC-98pc755

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Freedom Star, one of NASA's two solid rocket booster recovery ships, tows a barge containing the third Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank (SLWT) into Port Canaveral. Thi... more

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) pose in front of a Space Shuttle Main Engine on display for the ceremony. From left, they are Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations of United Space Alliance; John Plowden, vice president of Rocketdyne; Donald R. McMonagle, manager of Launch Integration; U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon; KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr.; Wade Ivey of Ivey Construction, Inc.; and Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc784

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Sp...

Participants in the ribbon cutting for KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF) pose in front of a Space Shuttle Main Engine on display for the ceremony. From left, th... more

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon (holding scissors) cut the ribbon at a ceremony on July 6 to open KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility (SSMEPF). Joining in the ribbon cutting are (left) Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations of United Space Alliance; Marvin L. Jones, director of Installation Operations; Donald R. McMonagle, manager of Launch Integration; (right) Wade Ivey of Ivey Construction, Inc.; Robert B. Sieck, director of Shuttle Processing; and John Plowden, vice president of Rocketdyne. A major addition to the existing Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, the SSMEPF replaces the Shuttle Main Engine Shop located in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The decision to move the shop out of the VAB was prompted by safety considerations and recent engine processing improvements. The first three main engines to be processed in the new facility will fly on Shuttle Endeavour's STS-88 mission in December 1998 KSC-98pc783

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldo...

KSC Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. and U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon (holding scissors) cut the ribbon at a ceremony on July 6 to open KSC's new 34,600-square-foot Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facili... more

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, cuts a High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tile on a gun stock contour milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttle orbiter’s external surface is shielded from heat by a network of more than 24,000 tiles formed from a silica fiber compound. HRSI tiles cover the lower surface of the orbiter, areas around the forward windows, upper body flap, the base heat shield, the "eyeballs" on the front of the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods, and the leading and trailing edges of the vertical stabilizer and the rudder speed brake. They are generally 6 inches square, but may also be as large as 12 inches square in some areas, and 1 to 5 inches thick. More advanced materials such as Flexible Insulation Blankets have replaced tiles on some upper surfaces of the orbiter KSC-98pc930

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance...

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, cuts a High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tile on a gun stock contour milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttl... more

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, holds down a curtain while making a test sample of tile on a block 5-axis computerized numerical control milling machine. About 70 percent of a Space Shuttle orbiter’s external surface is shielded from heat by a network of more than 24,000 tiles formed from a silica fiber compound. They are known as High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) tiles and Low-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (LRSI) tiles. Most HRSI tiles are 6 inches square, but may be as large as 12 inches in some areas, and 1 to 5 inches thick. LRSI tiles are generally 8 inches square, ranging from 0.2to 1-inch thick. More advanced materials such as Flexible Insulation Blankets have replaced tiles on some upper surfaces of the orbiter KSC-98pc929

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance...

In the Tile Fabrication Shop, Tony Rollins, with United Space Alliance, holds down a curtain while making a test sample of tile on a block 5-axis computerized numerical control milling machine. About 70 percent... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terri Schneider, a Timeline technician with United Space Alliance, and STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson, Ph.D., look at documentation during SPACEHAB familiarization at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility, Cape Canaveral. The mission, scheduled to launch Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc951

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terri Schneider, a Timeline technician w...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terri Schneider, a Timeline technician with United Space Alliance, and STS-95 Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson, Ph.D., look at documentation during SPACEHAB familiarization at t... more

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), the STS-95 crew gathers with United Space Alliance (USA) personnel and their families. From left are Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio; Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency (ESA); Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Ph.D.; Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA); Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (with arm raised); Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, M.D.; Jim Furr, USA National Space Flight Awareness representative; Jack King, USA Public Affairs; Bob Sieck, KSC director of Shuttle Processing; and Ed Adamek, USA vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations at KSC KSC-98pc1023

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), the STS-95...

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), the STS-95 crew gathers with United Space Alliance (USA) personnel and their families. From left are Pilot Steven W. Lindsey; Payload Specialist John ... more

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. talks to Mark King, a Space Shuttle midbody mechanical technician with United Space Alliance, and his daughter Jilianne. King is working in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2 on STS-95 payloads. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment which they will be working with on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998, on the Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1025

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, STS...

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. talks to Mark King, a Space Shuttle midbody mechanical technician with United Space Alliance, and ... more

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio, poses for a photo with Georgett Styers, United Space Alliance receiving scheduler, NASA Supply Logistics Depot, Cape Canaveral, Fla. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998, on the Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1026

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, Pay...

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio, poses for a photo with Georgett Styers, United Space Alliance receiving scheduler, N... more

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio, autographs a photo for Mathew and Alexandria Taraboletti. Standing behind them are their parents, Mark Taraboletti, an engineer with United Space Alliance (USA), and Eva Taraboletti, an orbiter integrity clerk with USA. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998, on the Space Shuttle Discovery. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1022

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Payload Sp...

During a break in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio, autographs a photo for Mathew and Alexandria Taraboletti. Standing behind them are their pa... more

During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), STS-95 crew members watch as the Spartan payload is moved inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility. At left is Keith Johnson, with United Space Alliance, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, and Mission Specialist Pedro Duque, with the European Space Agency. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they will be working on orbit. The launch of the STS-95 mission is scheduled for Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1031

During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), STS-95 crew members watch...

During Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), STS-95 crew members watch as the Spartan payload is moved inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility. At left is Keith Johnson, with United Space Alliance, Mission... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbox that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their flight. Talking to Ross is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, while Henry Thacker (facing camera), of Flight Crew Systems at KSC, looks on. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1215

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (crouching at left) and James H. Newman (far right) get a close look at equipment. Looking on is Wayne Wedlake (far left), with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, and a KSC worker (behind Newman) who is operating the movable work platform or bucket. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1217

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (crouching at left) and James H. Newman (fa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers them into the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (second from left) and James H. Newman (second from right) do a sharp-edge inspection. At their right is Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Below them is the Orbiter Docking System, the remote manipulator system arm and a tunnel into the payload bay. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1222

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers them into the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (second from left) and James H. Newman (secon... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bucket inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (far right) and James H. Newman (second from right) get a close look at the Orbiter Docking System. At left is the bucket operator and Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. The STS-88 crew members are in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to participate in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. While on orbit during STS-88, Unity will be latched atop the Orbiter Docking System in the forward section of Endeavour's payload bay for the mating of the two modules. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1219

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bucket inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (far right) and James H. Newman (second from righ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour, workers and STS-88 crew members on a movable work platform or bucket move closer to the rear of the orbiter's crew compartment. While Endeavour is being prepared for flight inside Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, the STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. A KSC worker (left) maneuvers the platform to give Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman (right) a closer look. Looking on is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour, workers and STS-88 crew members on a movable work platform or bucket move closer to the rear of the orbiter's crew compar... more

STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA) is checked by Danny Wyatt (left), with KSC, and Dave Martin (right), with United Space Alliance, in the white room before entry into Space Shuttle Discovery for a pre-launch countdown exercise. Duque and other crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations KSC-98pc1301

STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the Europ...

STS-95 Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA) is checked by Danny Wyatt (left), with KSC, and Dave Martin (right), with United Space Alliance, in the white room be... more

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, is checked by Dave Martin(left), with United Space Alliance, and Danny Wyatt (right), of KSC, before entry into Space Shuttle Discovery for a pre-launch countdown exercise. Glenn and other crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations KSC-98pc1300

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, is che...

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, is checked by Dave Martin(left), with United Space Alliance, and Danny Wyatt (right), of KSC, before entry into Space Shuttle Discovery for a pre-... more

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts, suits up with the help of George Brittingham, of United Space Alliance, in the Operations and Checkout (O&C)Building prior to his trip to Launch Pad 39-B. Glenn and the rest of the STS-95 crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) which includes mission familiarization activities, emergency egress training, and a simulated main engine cutoff. The other crew members are Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (M.D., Ph.D.), representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), and Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown. The STS-95 mission, targeted for liftoff on Oct. 29, includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process. Following the TCDT, the crew will be returning to Houston for final flight preparations KSC-98pc1286

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and o...

STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., a senator from Ohio and one of the original seven Project Mercury astronauts, suits up with the help of George Brittingham, of United Space Alliance, in the Operatio... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- The STS-88 crew get instruction from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA), on emergency egress procedures from launch pad 39A. From left, they are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross, Nancy J. Currie, James H. Newman and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, and Mission Commander Robert D. Cabana. The crew are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Mission STS-88 is targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998. It is the first U.S. flight for the assembly of the International Space Station and will carry the Unity connecting module KSC-98pc1519

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-88 crew get instruction from Ke...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-88 crew get instruction from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA), on emergency egress procedures from launch pad 39A. From left, th... more

Members of the STS-93 crew look over the Space Shuttle Columbia's main engine in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Facility as they listen to Al Strainer, with United Space Alliance. From left, the crew members are Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley, and Commander Eileen Collins. At the far right is Matt Gaetjens, with the Vehicle Integration Test Team. The fifth crew member (not shown) is Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman. STS-93, scheduled to launch July 9, has the primary mission of the deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0177

Members of the STS-93 crew look over the Space Shuttle Columbia's main...

Members of the STS-93 crew look over the Space Shuttle Columbia's main engine in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Facility as they listen to Al Strainer, with United Space Alliance. From left, the crew members are... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the orbiter Atlantis, Center Director Roy Bridges (seated at bottom left) and Associate Director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades JoAnn Morgan (standing second from left) learn about the new Multifunction Electronic Display Subsystem (MEDS) from Laural Patrick (standing left), a systems engineer with MEDS, and George Selina (at right), with United Space Alliance. Also called the "glass cockpit," the new full-color flat panel MEDS upgrade improves crew/orbiter interaction with easy-to-read, graphic portrayals of key flight indicators like attitude display and mach speed. The installation makes Atlantis the most modern orbiter in the fleet and equals the systems on current commercial jet airliners and military aircraft. Atlantis is scheduled to fly on mission STS-101 in early December KSC-99pp0410

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the orbiter Atlantis, Center Dire...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the orbiter Atlantis, Center Director Roy Bridges (seated at bottom left) and Associate Director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades JoAnn Morgan (standing second ... more

At Launch Pad 39B, the STS-96 crew listens to tech trainer Ken Clark, with United Space Alliance, about the use of the slidewire basket at left during emergency egress training. Standing left to right are Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, Commander Kent V. Rominger, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency, and Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency. The STS-96 crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities which also provide simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment KSC-99pp0467

At Launch Pad 39B, the STS-96 crew listens to tech trainer Ken Clark, ...

At Launch Pad 39B, the STS-96 crew listens to tech trainer Ken Clark, with United Space Alliance, about the use of the slidewire basket at left during emergency egress training. Standing left to right are Pilot... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) John Blue, with United Space Alliance, and Jorge Rivera, with NASA, look at the dings in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. About 150 dings were caused by hail during recent storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad as early as May 20 for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment KSC-99pp0537

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) John Blue, with United Space Alliance, and Jorge Rivera, with NASA, look at the dings in the foam insulation on the externa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Mike Sestile, with United Space Alliance, draws circles around divots in the foam insulation on the top of the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. About 150 divots were caused by hail during recent storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad as early as May 20 for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment KSC-99pp0539

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Mike Sestile, with United Space Alliance, draws circles around divots in the foam insulation on the top of the external tan... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), John Blue, with United Space Alliance, points to one of the divots in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. About 150 divots were caused by hail during recent storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad as early as May 20 for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment KSC-99pp0538

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assemb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside High Bay 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), John Blue, with United Space Alliance, points to one of the divots in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space S... more

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45th Space Wing, discuss safetyand health-related concerns in front of an audience of KSC employees as part of Super Safety and Health Day. Moderating at the podium is Loren Shriver, deputy director for Launch & Payload Processing. Seated left to right are Burt Summerfield, associate director of the Biomedical Office; Colonel William S. Swindling, commander, 45th Medical Group, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Programs, Johnson Space Center; Roy Bridges, Center Director; Col. Tom Deppe, vice commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base; Jim Schoefield, program manager, Payload Ground Operations, Boeing; Bill Hickman, program manager, Space Gateway Support; and Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations, United Space Alliance. Answering a question at the microphone on the floor is Dave King, director, Shuttle Processing. The panel was one of the presentations during KSC's second annual day-long dedication to safety. Most normal work activities were suspended to allow personnel to attend related activities. The theme, "Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand," emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space-related resources first and foremost. Events also included a keynote address, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television KSC-99pp0697

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45...

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45th Space Wing, discuss safetyand health-related concerns in front of an audience of KSC employees as part of Super Safety and Health Day. Mo... more

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45th Space Wing, discuss safetyand health-related concerns in front of an audience of KSC employees, as part of Super Safety and Health Day. Moderating at the podium is Loren Shriver, deputy director for Launch & Payload Processing. Seated left to right are Burt Summerfield, associate director of the Biomedical Office; Colonel William S. Swindling, commander, 45th Medical Group, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; Ron Dittemore, manager, Space Shuttle Programs, Johnson Space Center; Roy Bridges, Center Director; Col. Tom Deppe, vice commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base; Jim Schoefield, program manager, Payload Ground Operations, Boeing; Bill Hickman, program manager, Space Gateway Support; and Ed Adamek, vice president and associate program manager for Ground Operations, United Space Alliance. The panel was one of the presentations during KSC's second annual day-long dedication to safety. Most normal work activities were suspended to allow personnel to attend related activities. The theme, "Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand," emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space-related resources first and foremost. Events also included a keynote address, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television KSC-99pp0696

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45...

A panel of NASA and contractor senior staff, plus officers from the 45th Space Wing, discuss safetyand health-related concerns in front of an audience of KSC employees, as part of Super Safety and Health Day. M... more

In the Operations and Checkout Bldg., STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out a PRC-112 survival radio, part of flight equipment, under the eye of Ray Cuevas, with United Space Alliance. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include equipment check and a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew participating are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B KSC-99pp0739

In the Operations and Checkout Bldg., STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Colli...

In the Operations and Checkout Bldg., STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out a PRC-112 survival radio, part of flight equipment, under the eye of Ray Cuevas, with United Space Alliance. In preparation fo... more

(From left) STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Commander Eileen M. Collins watch and listen to Bob Parks, a Safety Egress trainer with United Space Alliance, explaining the use of the slideware basket for emergency egress from the pad. Inside the basket are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The STS-93 crew members are at KSC to participate in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, which familiarizes them with the mission, provides training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and includes a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B KSC-99pp0747

(From left) STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) an...

(From left) STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Commander Eileen M. Collins watch and listen to Bob Parks, a Safety Egress trainer with United Space Allianc... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1150

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FR... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rodney Wilson, with United Space Alliance, inspects the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttle Discovery. The cable, which relays a redundant emergency destruction signal between the SRBs in the unlikely event of a contingency, was damaged during close-out operations and is being replaced. Discovery's processing schedule leads to a target launch date of Dec. 6 KSC-99pp1292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rodney Wilson, with United Space Allianc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rodney Wilson, with United Space Alliance, inspects the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttle Discovery. The cable, which re... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terry Kent (left), United Space Alliance, and James Silviano (right), NASA, inspect the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttle Discovery. The cable, which relays a redundant emergency destruction signal between the SRBs in the unlikely event of a contingency, was damaged during close-out operations and is being replaced. Discovery's processing schedule leads to a target launch date of Dec. 6 KSC-99pp1290

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terry Kent (left), United Space Alliance...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Terry Kent (left), United Space Alliance, and James Silviano (right), NASA, inspect the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttl... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- James Silviano (bottom), NASA, examines the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttle Discovery, while Terry Kent (above), United Space Alliance, looks on. The cable, which relays a redundant emergency destruction signal between the SRBs in the unlikely event of a contingency, was damaged during close-out operations and is being replaced. Discovery's processing schedule leads to a target launch date of Dec. 6 KSC-99pp1291

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- James Silviano (bottom), NASA, examines ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- James Silviano (bottom), NASA, examines the range safety cable between the external tank and solid rocket boosters (SRB) on Space Shuttle Discovery, while Terry Kent (above), Unite... more

James Stickley (left) and Derry Dilby (right), who are with United Space Alliance, check over a spare four-inch diameter LH2 recirculation line that will be used to replace a damaged LH2 line in the orbiter Discovery. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. Workers noted a dent in the line during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The dent measures 12 inches long and about ½-inch deep. Managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1398

James Stickley (left) and Derry Dilby (right), who are with United Spa...

James Stickley (left) and Derry Dilby (right), who are with United Space Alliance, check over a spare four-inch diameter LH2 recirculation line that will be used to replace a damaged LH2 line in the orbiter Dis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Todd Biddle, with United Space Alliance, inspects wiring in the aft compartment of Discovery before launch. Electrical wire inspections and repairs in the orbiter's payload bay, external tank umbilical and engine compartment have been ongoing for more than a month and are near completion. Launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 is scheduled for Dec. 11 at 11:42 p.m. from Launch Pad 39B. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Todd Biddle, with United Space Alliance,...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Todd Biddle, with United Space Alliance, inspects wiring in the aft compartment of Discovery before launch. Electrical wire inspections and repairs in the orbiter's payload bay, ex... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chris Kidd, with United Space Alliance (USA) stands by outside the aft compartment of Discovery while Todd Biddle (USA) inspects wiring inside. Electrical wire inspections and repairs in the orbiter's payload bay, external tank umbilical and engine compartment have been ongoing for more than a month and are near completion. Launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 is scheduled for Dec. 11 at 11:42 p.m. from Launch Pad 39B. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1394

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chris Kidd, with United Space Alliance (...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chris Kidd, with United Space Alliance (USA) stands by outside the aft compartment of Discovery while Todd Biddle (USA) inspects wiring inside. Electrical wire inspections and repa... more

Gary Hamilton (left) and James Stickley, both with United Space Alliance, check out a spare four-inch diameter LH2 recirculation line that will be used to replace a damaged LH2 line in the orbiter Discovery. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. Workers noted a dent in the line during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The dent measures 12 inches long and about ½-inch deep. Managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1396

Gary Hamilton (left) and James Stickley, both with United Space Allian...

Gary Hamilton (left) and James Stickley, both with United Space Alliance, check out a spare four-inch diameter LH2 recirculation line that will be used to replace a damaged LH2 line in the orbiter Discovery. Th... more

In the Payload Changeout Room, Launch Pad 39B, United Space Alliance and NASA workers look at the replacement main propulsion system liquid hydrogen recirculation line (left) to be installed in Shuttle Discovery's aft compartment. At right is the dented line that has been removed. The 12-inch-long dent was discovered during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. The line is being replaced and managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1403

In the Payload Changeout Room, Launch Pad 39B, United Space Alliance a...

In the Payload Changeout Room, Launch Pad 39B, United Space Alliance and NASA workers look at the replacement main propulsion system liquid hydrogen recirculation line (left) to be installed in Shuttle Discover... more

Workers with United Space Alliance remove Shuttle Discovery's dented main propulsion system liquid hydrogen recirculation line. From left are James Stickley, George Atkins, and Todd Biddle. The 12-inch-long dent was discovered during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. The line is being replaced and managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope KSC-99pp1402

Workers with United Space Alliance remove Shuttle Discovery's dented m...

Workers with United Space Alliance remove Shuttle Discovery's dented main propulsion system liquid hydrogen recirculation line. From left are James Stickley, George Atkins, and Todd Biddle. The 12-inch-long den... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., in his orange launch and entry suit, enjoys a laugh with closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From left are United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Rene Arriens, USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson, and NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1480

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., i...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., in his orange launch and entry suit, enjoys a laugh with closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From left are U... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), in his orange launch and entry suit, is assisted by closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. At left is United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo and at right is NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1484

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Gruns...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), in his orange launch and entry suit, is assisted by closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. At le... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), in his orange launch and entry suit, is assisted by closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. At left is United Space Alliance (USA) Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and USA Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1483

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Fo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), in his orange launch and entry suit, is assisted by closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. At lef... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier, in his orange launch and entry suit, shakes hands with NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt in the White Room before entering the orbiter. Other closeout crew members are United Space Alliance (USA) Suit Technician Ray Cuevas (left) and USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1481

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicoll...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier, in his orange launch and entry suit, shakes hands with NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt in the White Room before entering ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly, in his orange launch and entry suit, waits for assistance from closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. Seen at left is United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Rene Arriens. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1482

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly, in his ora...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly, in his orange launch and entry suit, waits for assistance from closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. Seen at left is Un... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room, STS-103 Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and Jean-Francois Clervoy, in their orange launch and entry suits, are getting ready to enter Space Shuttle Discovery. Assisting them are closeout crew members (from left) United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Rene Arriens, NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt, USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and USA Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1486

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room, STS-103 Mission Speci...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room, STS-103 Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and Jean-Francois Clervoy, in their orange launch and entry suits, are getting ready to enter Space Shuttle Discovery... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, in his orange launch and entry suit, waits for assistance from closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From left, they are NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt, United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo and USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1485

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, in his orange launch and entry suit, waits for assistance from closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss is helped with pre-pack and fit check by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance. Voss and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0201

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission ...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss is helped with pre-pack and fit check by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance. Voss and other crew members Comma... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (left) and Leonard Groce (right)help STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with his suit check. Gillis and Groce are with United Space Alliance. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0202

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (left) and Leonard Groce (right)help STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with his suit check. Gillis and Groce are with United Space Alliance. Gorie a... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss is helped with pre-pack and fit check by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance. Voss and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0201

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission ...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, STS-99 Mission Specialist Janice Voss is helped with pre-pack and fit check by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance. Voss and other crew members Comma... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele with pre-pack and fit check. Thiele and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0199

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, w...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele with pre-pack and fit check. Thiele and other crew members Command... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (left) and Leonard Groce (right)help STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with his suit check. Gillis and Groce are with United Space Alliance. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0202

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlos Gillis (left) and Leonard Groce (right)help STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with his suit check. Gillis and Groce are with United Space Alliance. Gorie a... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele with pre-pack and fit check. Thiele and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0199

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, w...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele with pre-pack and fit check. Thiele and other crew members Command... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with pre-pack and fit check. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0200

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis,...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with pre-pack and fit check. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kreg... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with pre-pack and fit check. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Kavandi, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are preparing for launch of their mission on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0200

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis,...

In the Operations and Checkout Building's suitup room, Carlous Gillis, with United Space Alliance, helps STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie with pre-pack and fit check. Gorie and other crew members Commander Kevin Kreg... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany smiles as suit technician Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps him with his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC-00pp0208

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Ger...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany smiles as suit technician Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps him with his launch and entry suit during f... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany smiles as suit technician Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps him with his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC00pp0208

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Ger...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany smiles as suit technician Andre Denard, with United Space Alliance, helps him with his launch and entry suit during f... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie has his helmet checked by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance, during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC00pp0209

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie ha...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie has his helmet checked by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance, during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography M... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie has his helmet checked by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance, during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC-00pp0209

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie ha...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie has his helmet checked by Santos Medina, with United Space Alliance, during final launch preparations. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography M... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis, Tod Biddle, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician, points to the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The PDU controls the rudder/speed brake on the orbiter. The hands at right belong to Bob Wright, also a USA technician. Shuttle managers decided to replace the faulty PDU, about the size of an office copy machine, at the launch pad. If successful, launch preparations will continue as planned, with liftoff targeted for April 24 at 4:15 p.m. on mission STS-101. The mission is the third assembly flight for the International Space Station, carrying logistics and supplies to the Space Station, plus the crew will be preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station KSC00pp0486

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis, Tod Biddle, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician, points to the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The P... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin removing thermal blankets and panels from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis in order to reach the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The PDU controls the rudder/speed brake on the orbiter. From left to right are Mark Noel, Bob Wright and Tod Biddle, with United Space Alliance. Shuttle managers decided to replace the faulty PDU, about the size of an office copy machine, at the launch pad. If successful, launch preparations will continue as planned, with liftoff targeted for April 24 at 4:15 p.m. on mission STS-101. The mission is the third assembly flight for the International Space Station, carrying logistics and supplies to the Space Station, plus the crew will be preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station KSC00pp0484

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin remo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin removing thermal blankets and panels from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis in order to reach the power drive unit (PDU) inside. Th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin removing thermal blankets and panels from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis in order to reach the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The PDU controls the rudder/speed brake on the orbiter. From left to right are Mark Noel, Bob Wright and Tod Biddle, with United Space Alliance. Shuttle managers decided to replace the faulty PDU, about the size of an office copy machine, at the launch pad. If successful, launch preparations will continue as planned, with liftoff targeted for April 24 at 4:15 p.m. on mission STS-101. The mission is the third assembly flight for the International Space Station, carrying logistics and supplies to the Space Station, plus the crew will be preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station KSC-00pp0484

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin remo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians at Launch Pad 39A begin removing thermal blankets and panels from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis in order to reach the power drive unit (PDU) inside. Th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis, Tod Biddle, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician, points to the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The PDU controls the rudder/speed brake on the orbiter. The hands at right belong to Bob Wright, also a USA technician. Shuttle managers decided to replace the faulty PDU, about the size of an office copy machine, at the launch pad. If successful, launch preparations will continue as planned, with liftoff targeted for April 24 at 4:15 p.m. on mission STS-101. The mission is the third assembly flight for the International Space Station, carrying logistics and supplies to the Space Station, plus the crew will be preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station KSC-00pp0486

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With coverings removed from a site near the tail of Space Shuttle Atlantis, Tod Biddle, a United Space Alliance (USA) technician, points to the power drive unit (PDU) inside. The P... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig014

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of tw...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 200... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the plug to a mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle. DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00padig012

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pul...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle is lowered into the waters of the Atlantic during a test of a new booster retrieval method. A one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig011

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle is lowered into the waters of the Atlantic during a test of a new booster retrieval method. A one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 i... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rocket booster nozzle (center). Known as DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig013

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rock... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig010

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplica... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is tested in Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nearby are divers; inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig015

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorke...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is tested in Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nearby are divers; inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is be... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rocket booster nozzle (center). Known as DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00padig013

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rock... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00padig014

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of tw...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 200... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is tested in Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nearby are divers; inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00padig015

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorke...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is tested in Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nearby are divers; inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is be... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig016

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man sub...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00padig016

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man sub...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the plug to a mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle. DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00padig012

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pul...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the p... more

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00pp0597

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liber...

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job... more

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00pp0598

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liber...

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ab... more

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00pp0597

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liber...

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job... more

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC-00pp0596

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liber...

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job... more

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program KSC00pp0598

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liber...

The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ab... more