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Topic: slf

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Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF.

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF

Orbiter Atlantis arrival at SLF

STS-28 crewmembers' wives at KSC shuttle landing facility (SLF) with banner

STS-28 crewmembers' wives at KSC shuttle landing facility (SLF) with b...

STS028-S-009 (5 Aug 1989) --- Wives of the STS-28 crewmembers display a banner upon the arrival of the astronauts in Florida to begin preparing for their Aug. 8 launch. Left to right are Susan Adamson, Kathleen... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery at the SLF.    Photo credit: NASA KSC-390C-5504-16

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery at the SLF. Photo credit: NASA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery at the SLF and towed into the mate/demate device.    Photo credit: NASA KSC-390C-5505-10

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-31. Return of the space shuttle Discovery at the SLF and towed into the mate/demate device. Photo credit: NASA

STS-38 crewmembers egress OV-104 via mobile stairway at KSC's SLF

STS-38 crewmembers egress OV-104 via mobile stairway at KSC's SLF

STS-38 crewmembers, wearing red, yellow, and orange polo shirts, egress Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, via a mobile stairway at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Commander ... more

STS-38 Atlantis, OV-104, during safing operations after KSC SLF landing

STS-38 Atlantis, OV-104, during safing operations after KSC SLF landin...

Spotlights illuminate Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during safing operations at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). OV-104 parked on runway 33 is serviced by KSC ground crew... more

STS-38 crew poses in front of OV-104 at KSC's SLF during post flight activity

STS-38 crew poses in front of OV-104 at KSC's SLF during post flight a...

STS038-S-040 (20 Nov 1990) --- STS-38 crewmembers, wearing red, yellow, and orange polo shirts, pose in front of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, parked on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Shuttle ... more

STS-38 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

STS-38 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at KSC S...

STS038-S-041 (20 Nov 1990) --- STS-38 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The main landing gear (MLG) has just touched down on th... more

STS-39 crewmembers arrive at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) in T-38As

STS-39 crewmembers arrive at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) in T...

STS039-S-003 (20 April 1991) --- Astronaut Michael L. Coats (right) addresses the news media after arriving at the Shuttle Landing Facility along with his six fellow crewmembers. From left are astronauts Richa... more

STS-43 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 15 at KSC's SLF

STS-43 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 15 at KSC's...

STS-43 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 15 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The main landing gear (MLG) touched down at 8:23:25 am (Eastern Daylight Time ... more

STS-45 Landing

STS-45 Landing

As the sun rises the morning of April 2, it casts a rosy glow over a steller performer, the orbiter Atlantis parked on Runway 33 of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Atlantis touched down at 6:23:6 a.m. EST, comple... more

STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on runway 33 at KSC S...

STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, lands on concrete runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The main landing gear (MLG) touched down at 6:23:06 am (Eastern Stand... more

STS-50 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

STS-50 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC S...

STS-50 Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, main landing gear touches down on runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) producing a small cloud of dust. Landing occurred at 7... more

STS-50 Columbia, OV-102, landing with drag chute deploy at KSC SLF runway 33

STS-50 Columbia, OV-102, landing with drag chute deploy at KSC SLF run...

STS050-S-105 (9 July 1992) --- The main drag chute on the Space Shuttle Columbia is fully deployed soon after the Space Shuttle touches down at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) landing facility. Landing occurred... more

STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, landing sequence at KSC SLF

STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, landing sequence at KSC SL...

STS047-S-116 (20 Sept 1992) --- The Space Shuttle Endeavour prepares to land on the Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle landing facility runway. The successful landing marked the completion of an eight-day Earth-or... more

STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC S...

STS052-S-098 (1 Nov 1992) --- This ground-level side view shows the Space Shuttle Columbia just prior to main landing gear touchdown at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to successfully complete a ten-day Earth-o... more

STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC SLF

STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, lands on runway 33 at KSC S...

STS052-S-099 (1 Nov. 1992) --- This three-quarter front view shows the Space Shuttle Columbia just after deployment of the drag chute during landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Onboard were a crew of fiv... more

STS-56 Landing

STS-56 Landing

A four-million-mile journey draws to a flawless ending as the orbiter Discovery lands at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, Runway 33. Main gear touchdown occurred at 7:37:19 a.m. EDT, April 17, 1993. This was the... more

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC's SLF

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC'...

STS054-S-100 (19 Jan 1993) --- The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Endeavour rolls toward wheelstop at KSC's Shuttle landing facility. Landing occurred at 8:38 a.m. (EST), Jan. 19, 1993. Onbo... more

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC's SLF

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC'...

STS054-S-101 (19 Jan 1993) --- The drag chute is just about to be released as the Space Shuttle Endeavour rolls toward wheelstop at KSC's Shuttle landing facility. Landing occurred at 8:38 a.m. (EST), Jan. 19, ... more

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC's SLF

STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, lands on runway 33 at KSC'...

STS054-S-098 (19 Jan 1993) --- This ground-level side view shows the Space Shuttle Endeavour during main landing gear touchdown at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to successfully complete a six day Earth-orbital... more

STS-56 Discovery, OV-103, with drag chute deployed lands on KSC SLF runway 33

STS-56 Discovery, OV-103, with drag chute deployed lands on KSC SLF ru...

STS056-S-098 (17 April 1993) --- The drag chute is deployed following landing of the Space Shuttle Discovery on the Shuttle landing facility at the Kennedy Space Center to complete the STS-56\Atlas 2 mission. ... more

STS-57 Endeavour, OV-105, with drag chute deployed lands on KSC SLF runway 33

STS-57 Endeavour, OV-105, with drag chute deployed lands on KSC SLF ru...

STS057-S-082 (1 July 1993) --- The drag chute on the Space Shuttle Endeavour is fully deployed in this scene on Runway 33 (KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility) as the spacecraft successfully completes a ten-day miss... more

STS-65 Columbia, OV-102, with drag chute deployed lands at KSC SLF

STS-65 Columbia, OV-102, with drag chute deployed lands at KSC SLF

The Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, its drag chute fully deployed, completes a record duration mission as it lands on Runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF)... more

STS-65 crewmembers pose in front of OV-102 after landing at KSC's SLF

STS-65 crewmembers pose in front of OV-102 after landing at KSC's SLF

STS-65 Commander Robert D. Cabana (right) and Mission Specialist Donald A. Thomas, wearing launch and entry suits (LESs), signal mission success with a "thumbs up" gesture as they stand in front of Columbia, Or... more

STS-86 Landing

STS-86 Landing

The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on runway 15 of the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main ... more

STS-86 Landing

STS-86 Landing

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 ... more

STS-84 Landing

STS-84 Landing

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate- Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC's Runway 33 at the conclusion of STS-84... more

The landing of STS-81 Atlantis, OV-104, on a runway at KSC's SLF

The landing of STS-81 Atlantis, OV-104, on a runway at KSC's SLF

STS081-S-010 (22 Jan. 1997) --- A drag chute is deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls toward a wheels stopped mode on Runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to conclude the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking... more

The landing of STS-81 Atlantis, OV-104, on a runway at KSC's SLF

The landing of STS-81 Atlantis, OV-104, on a runway at KSC's SLF

STS081-S-008 (22 Jan. 1997) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to conclude the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. Coming to a halt at 9:22:44 a.m. (EST),... more

The STS-85 flight crew members pose with their T-38 jet trainer aircraft at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85 mission. They are (from left): Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson; Payload Commander N. Jan Davis; Pilot Kent V. Rominger; Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason; Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr.; and Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery for the 11-day space flight is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2). Other STS-85 payloads include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1159

The STS-85 flight crew members pose with their T-38 jet trainer aircra...

The STS-85 flight crew members pose with their T-38 jet trainer aircraft at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85... more

STS-85 Pilot Kent V. Rominger (left) and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason prepare to greet the rest of the flight crew at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85 mission. The other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr., Payload Commander N. Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., and Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery for the 11-day space flight is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS2). Other STS-85 payloads include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1163

STS-85 Pilot Kent V. Rominger (left) and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. ...

STS-85 Pilot Kent V. Rominger (left) and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason prepare to greet the rest of the flight crew at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Spac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-85 flight crew members address the news media at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85 mission. They are (from left): Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson; Payload Commander N. Jan Davis; Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr.; Pilot Kent V. Rominger; Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr.; and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery for the 11-day space flight is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2). Other STS-85 payloads include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments. KSC-97PC1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-85 flight crew members address t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-85 flight crew members address the news media at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after their arrival from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for... more

STS-85 Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr. poses in the cockpit of his T-38 jet trainer aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after his arrival with the rest of the flight crew from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85 mission. The other crew members are Pilot Kent V. Rominger, Payload Commander N. Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery for the 11-day space flight is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2). Other STS-85 payloads include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1161

STS-85 Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr. poses in the cockpit of his T-38...

STS-85 Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr. poses in the cockpit of his T-38 jet trainer aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after his arrival with the rest of the flight crew from NASA’s Johnson Space C... more

STS-85 Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason poses in the cockpit of his T-38 jet trainer aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after his arrival with the rest of the flight crew from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin final preparations for the STS-85 mission. The other crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr., Pilot Kent V. Rominger, Payload Commander N. Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., and Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery for the 11-day space flight is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2). Other STS-85 payloads include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1162

STS-85 Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason poses in the cockpit of...

STS-85 Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason poses in the cockpit of his T-38 jet trainer aircraft at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after his arrival with the rest of the flight crew from NASA’s Johnso... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1495

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1504

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1505

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) can be seen in the background. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

STS-90 Landing

STS-90 Landing

(May 3, 1998) A flock of birds takes flight as the orbiter Columbia, with its drag chute deployed, touches down on Runway 22 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. Main ... more

STS-90 Landing

STS-90 Landing

(May 3, 1998) Flying along the Indian River toward KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility is the orbiter Columbia as it nears touchdown on Runway 33 to complete the nearly 16-day STS-90 mission. This unique view with T... more

STS-95 Landing

STS-95 Landing

Orbiter Discovery is riding on its main landing gear as it lowers its nose wheel after touching down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Main gear touchdown was at 12:04 p.m. EST, landing on orbit 135... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc250

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc251

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc253

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc256

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-398d1fr09

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the K...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 19... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc255

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts. KSC-98pasts89-2

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-398d1fr03

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the K...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 19... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc254

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-pasts89-1

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the K...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 19... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc247

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-398d1fr06

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the K...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 19... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-pasts89-2

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the K...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 19... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc249

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc252

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pasts89-1

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:35:09 p.m. EST on Jan. 31, 1998. The wheels stopped at 5:36:19 EST, completing a total mission time of eight days, 19 hours, 48 minutes and four seconds. The 89th Space Shuttle mission was the 42nd (and 13th consecutive) landing of the orbiter at KSC, and STS-89 was the eighth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., succeeded NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member David Wolf, M.D., who was on the Russian space station since late September 1997. Dr. Wolf returned to Earth on Endeavour with the remainder of the STS-89 crew, including Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists James Reilly, Ph.D.; Michael Anderson; Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; and Salizhan Sharipov with the Russian Space Agency. Dr. Thomas is scheduled to remain on Mir until the STS-91 Shuttle mission returns in June 1998. In addition to the docking and crew exchange, STS-89 included the transfer of science, logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecrafts KSC-98pc248

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly nine-day STS-89 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5... more

The Shuttle lands at the SLF KSC-398D1F03

The Shuttle lands at the SLF KSC-398D1F03

The Shuttle lands at the SLF

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles Precourt (left) talks to Elena V. Kondakova and her husband, Valery Ryumin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and STS-91 mission specialist, at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The STS-91 crew had just arrived at the SLF aboard T-38 jets in preparation for launch. Kondakova, also a cosmonaut with the RSA, flew with Commander Precourt as a mission specialist on STS-84 which launched on May 15, 1997. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 on Space Shuttle Discovery with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc662

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles Precourt (left) talks to Elena V. Kon...

STS-91 Mission Commander Charles Precourt (left) talks to Elena V. Kondakova and her husband, Valery Ryumin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and STS-91 mission specialist, at Kennedy Space Cente... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Startled by the almost silent appearance of the orbiter Discovery as it lands following the STS-91 mission, several birds hurriedly leave KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) for a more secluded spot. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, home to over 300 species of birds. Discovery's main gear touchdown on Runway 15 was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, landing on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. During the mission, the orbiter docked with the Russian space station Mir for the ninth time, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. STS-91 also featured first flights for both the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and the Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew included Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space KSC-98pc739

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Startled by the almost silent appearance...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Startled by the almost silent appearance of the orbiter Discovery as it lands following the STS-91 mission, several birds hurriedly leave KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) for a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on Runway 15 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the STS-91 mission. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, as is apparent from the abundance of native vegetation and water surrounding the landing strip. Main gear touchdown was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, landing on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. During the mission, the orbiter docked with the Russian space station Mir for the ninth time, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. STS-91 also featured first flights for both the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and the Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew included Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space KSC-98dc734

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on Runway 15 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the STS-91 mission. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island ... more

North of the Launch Complex 39 Area, the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) stretches to the northwest. One of the largest runways in the world, the runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest of the Vehicle Assembly Building and is 4,572 meters (15,000 ft) long and 91.4 meters (300 ft) wide -- about as wide as the length of a football field. It has 305 meters (1000 ft) of paved overruns at each end and the paving thickness is 40.6cm (15 in) at the center. The facility includes a 150 x 168-meter (490 ft x 550 ft) parking apron (at right) and a 3.2-km (2-mile) tow-way connecting it with the Orbiter Processing Facility. KSC-98PC-1056

North of the Launch Complex 39 Area, the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF...

North of the Launch Complex 39 Area, the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) stretches to the northwest. One of the largest runways in the world, the runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest of the Vehicle Assem... more

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbiter landings at the Kennedy Space Center are made on one of the largest runways in the world. The runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest of the Vehicle Assembly Building and is 4,572 meters (15,000ft) long and 91.4 meters (300ft) wide -- about as wide as the length of a football field. It has 305 meters (1000ft) of paved overruns at each end and the paving thickness is 40.6cm (15 inches) at the center. At left in the photo is the Aircraft Ground Equipment Shed; in the center is the Landing Aids Control Building (LACB) which supports landing operations and houses operations personnel. Located at the northeast corner of the parking apron is the Mate/Demate device (MDD) used to raise and lower the orbiter from its 747 carrier aircraft during ferry operations. The open-truss steel structure is equipped with hoists, adapters and movable platforms for access to certain orbiter components and equipment. It also is equipped with lightning protection devices. The MDD is 45.7 meters (150ft) long, 28.3 meters (93ft) wide and 32 meters (105ft) high. On the landing area in front of the SLF is a T-38 jet airplane. KSC-98PC-1040

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbite...

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbiter landings at the Kennedy Space Center are made on one of the largest runways in the world. The runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking northwest, the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the Launch Complex 39 area of KSC can be seen with its new coat of paint, along with newly painted American flag and NASA logo. The improved look was finished in time to honor NASA's 40th anniversary on Oct. 1. In order to do the job, workers were suspended on platforms from the top of the 525-foot-high VAB. One of the world's largest buildings by volume, the VAB is the last stop for the Shuttle before rollout to the launch pad. Integration and stacking of the complete Space Shuttle vehicle (orbiter, two solid rocket boosters and the external tank) takes place in High Bays 1 or 3. The High Bay doors (shown partially open), four in all, are 456 feet high. The low-door section, 114 feet high, has four panels that move horizontally. The upper section, 342 feet high, has seven panels that move vertically. It takes about 45 minutes to open all panels. Beyond the VAB is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The SLF is used for end-of-mission orbiter landings, and also military and civilian cargo carriers, astronauts' T-38 trainers, Shuttle Training Aircraft, and helicopters KSC-98pc1239

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking northwest, the Vehicle Assembly ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking northwest, the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the Launch Complex 39 area of KSC can be seen with its new coat of paint, along with newly painted American flag and NASA ... more

STS-95 Pilot Steven K. Lindsey leaves the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) enroute to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He is accompanied by two suit technicians, Mike Birkenseher (left) and Paul Reylea (right). Lindsey will be practicing Shuttle landing and takeoffs at the SLF on the STA, which is designed to fly like the Shuttle, prior to launch. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7 KSC-98pc1406

STS-95 Pilot Steven K. Lindsey leaves the Shuttle Landing Facility (SL...

STS-95 Pilot Steven K. Lindsey leaves the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) enroute to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He is accompanied by two suit technicians, Mike Birkenseher (left) and Paul Reylea (right... more

STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) leaves the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) enroute to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He is accompanied by two suit technicians, Ray Cuevas (middle) and Carlous Gillis (right). Brown will be practicing Shuttle landing and takeoffs at the SLF prior to launch. The STA is designed to fly like the Shuttle. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7 KSC-98pc1405

STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) leaves the Shuttle...

STS-95 Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) leaves the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) enroute to the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). He is accompanied by two suit technicians, Ray Cuevas (middle) and C... more

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1879

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RL...

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be locat... more

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be located at the tow-way adjacent to the SLF, the complex will include a multi-purpose RLV hangar and adjacent facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. It will be available to accommodate the Space Shuttle, the X-34 RLV technology demonstrator, the L-1011 carrier aircraft for Pegasus and X-34, and other RLV and X-vehicle programs. The complex is jointly funded by the Spaceport Florida Authority, NASA's Space Shuttle Program and KSC. The facility will be operational in early 2000 KSC-98dc1878

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RL...

An artist's rendering shows the $8-million Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Support Complex planned for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. The ground breaking took place today. To be locat... more

During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team removes a crew member from a mock Shuttle. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the "crew" for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0296

During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landin...

During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team removes a crew member from a mock Shuttle. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario o... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the woods next to the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team takes part in training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the "crew" for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0294

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the woods next to the Shuttle Landing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the woods next to the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team takes part in training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulatio... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices carrying an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach the site, drop emergency equipment and later remove the "crew" five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices carrying an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helico... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the KSC response team removes a Shuttle "crew" member from the mock orbiter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the "crew" for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the KSC response team removes a Shuttle "crew" member from the mock orbiter. The response team is ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), a fire/rescue worker practices disembarking from an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The KSC response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the "crew" for preliminary traige. The helicopters are used later to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0298

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), a fire/rescue worker practices disembarking from an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The KSC resp... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices lifting an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach and prepare the "crew" five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker for preliminary triage. The exercise will conclude with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices lifting an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicop... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the "crew" for preliminary triage. The helicopters are then used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a loc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers who will prepare the "crew" for preliminary triage. The helicopters later will help remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted "patients" arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals KSC-99pp0301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a loc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back at Launch Pad 39B to reveal the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0578

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Rotating Service Structure is rolled...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back at Launch Pad 39B to reveal the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. STS-96 is a... more

Launched on time at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT, Space Shuttle Discovery blasts through a gossamer sky on mission STS-96. A 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, STS-96 is carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-padg96lo

Launched on time at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT, Space Shuttle Discovery blasts t...

Launched on time at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT, Space Shuttle Discovery blasts through a gossamer sky on mission STS-96. A 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, STS-96 is carrying abo... more

The STS-96 crew gather at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after landing aboard the T-38 jet aircraft in the background. From left are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Ellen Ochoa and Julie Payette, and Pilot Rick D. Husband. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10-day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0575

The STS-96 crew gather at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after landi...

The STS-96 crew gather at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after landing aboard the T-38 jet aircraft in the background. From left are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, T... more

STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan smiles in excitement on her arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0574

STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan smiles in excitement on h...

STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan smiles in excitement on her arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She joins other crew members Commander Kent ... more

STS-96 Pilot Rick D. Husband waves on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include aspace walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0573

STS-96 Pilot Rick D. Husband waves on his arrival at Kennedy Space Cen...

STS-96 Pilot Rick D. Husband waves on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Speciali... more

STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger smiles on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Rick D. Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev for launch preparations prior to liftoff. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency and Tokarev represents the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0572

STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger smiles on his arrival at Kennedy Spa...

STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger smiles on his arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He joins other crew members Pilot Rick D. Husband and Mission Special... more

The STS-96 crew talk to the media at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility after arriving aboard T-38 jet aircraft. From left are Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev and Julie Payette, Commander Kent V. Rominger (at microphone), Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Pilot Rick D. Husband and Daniel T. Barry. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10-day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0576

The STS-96 crew talk to the media at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility af...

The STS-96 crew talk to the media at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility after arriving aboard T-38 jet aircraft. From left are Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Valery Ivanovich Tokarev and Julie Payette, Com... more

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, responds to questions from the media after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. On the right is Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa. Other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The crew will take part in various launch preparations before the scheduled liftoff on May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying 5000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. After the 10-day mission, landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 3:25 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0577

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian S...

STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who represents the Canadian Space Agency, responds to questions from the media after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. On the right is Mission Specialist Ellen... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of the external tank is the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm, with a vent hood, known as the "beanie cap," at the outer end. Below it up against Discovery is the orbiter access arm, which allows entry into the orbiter crew compartment. through an environmental chamber or "white room" at the outer end. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0580

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of the external tank is a vent hood, known as the "beanie cap," at the end of the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0579

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of... more

The STS-96 crew smile and wave at onlookers as they eagerly head for the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery, targeted for 6:49 a.m. EDT. From left to right in front are Mission Specialists Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Ellen Ochoa, Julie Payette and Tamara E. Jernigan; in back are Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Commander Kent V. Rominger. Payette is with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0590

The STS-96 crew smile and wave at onlookers as they eagerly head for t...

The STS-96 crew smile and wave at onlookers as they eagerly head for the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery, targeted for 6:49 a.m. EDT. From left to right in front... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency, waves as he is assisted by a suit technician in donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction.. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0582

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-96 Mission Specialist Val...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency, waves as he is assisted by a suit technician in donning his launch and entry... more