PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout

  • account_boxLogin
103 media by topicpage 1 of 2

Interior showing Staircase and Skylight

John Gregory Crace (British, London 1809–1889 Dulwich) , and Son

Design for Skylight, New University Club

John Dibblee Crace (British, London 1838–1919 London)

Skylight for Room 89 n.w.

U.S. Capitol (drawing).

Skylight Cave in the Navy Yard

View from inside the cave of man in boat at entrance of the cave.

Skylight Glass On Northwest End of Building 22 (43), Broken b Weight of Snow, Looking Southeast

Photographs of the Construction and Repair of Buildings, Facilities, and Vessels at the New York Navy Yard

Building 128 (63A) Skylight Glass with Wire Screen Underneath

Photographs of the Construction and Repair of Buildings, Facilities, and Vessels at the New York Navy Yard

Building 128 (63A) Skylight Glass with Wire Screen Underneath

Photographs of the Construction and Repair of Buildings, Facilities, and Vessels at the New York Navy Yard

Temperature Behavior of Possible Cave Skylight on Mars

Temperature Behavior of Possible Cave Skylight on Mars NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/USGS

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it will serve as a literal skylight to control some of the most sophisticated robotics ever built. The space station crew will use Cupola windows, six around the sides and one on the top, for line-of-sight monitoring of outside activities, including spacewalks, docking operations and exterior equipment surveys. The Cupola will be used specifically to monitor the approach and berthing of the Japanese H-2 supply spacecraft and other visiting vehicles. The Cupola also will serve as the primary location for controlling Canadarm2, the 60-foot space station robotic arm. Space station crews currently use two robotic control workstations in the Destiny laboratory to operate the arm. One of the robotic control stations will be placed inside the Cupola. The view from the Cupola will enhance an arm operator's situational awareness, supplementing television cameras and graphics. The Cupola is scheduled to launch on a future space station assembly mission. It will be installed on the forward port of Node 3, a connecting module to be installed as well. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1794

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it will serve as a literal skylight to control some of the most sophisticated robotics ever built. The space station crew will use Cupola windows, six around the sides and one on the top, for line-of-sight monitoring of outside activities, including spacewalks, docking operations and exterior equipment surveys. The Cupola will be used specifically to monitor the approach and berthing of the Japanese H-2 supply spacecraft and other visiting vehicles. The Cupola also will serve as the primary location for controlling Canadarm2, the 60-foot space station robotic arm. Space station crews currently use two robotic control workstations in the Destiny laboratory to operate the arm. One of the robotic control stations will be placed inside the Cupola. The view from the Cupola will enhance an arm operator's situational awareness, supplementing television cameras and graphics. The Cupola is scheduled to launch on a future space station assembly mission. It will be installed on the forward port of Node 3, a connecting module to be installed as well. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1795

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it will serve as a literal skylight to control some of the most sophisticated robotics ever built. The space station crew will use Cupola windows, six around the sides and one on the top, for line-of-sight monitoring of outside activities, including spacewalks, docking operations and exterior equipment surveys. The Cupola will be used specifically to monitor the approach and berthing of the Japanese H-2 supply spacecraft and other visiting vehicles. The Cupola also will serve as the primary location for controlling Canadarm2, the 60-foot space station robotic arm. Space station crews currently use two robotic control workstations in the Destiny laboratory to operate the arm. One of the robotic control stations will be placed inside the Cupola. The view from the Cupola will enhance an arm operator's situational awareness, supplementing television cameras and graphics. The Cupola is scheduled to launch on a future space station assembly mission. It will be installed on the forward port of Node 3, a connecting module to be installed as well. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Cupola, another module built in Italy for the United States segment of the International Space Station, resides in the Space Station Processing Facility. With 360-degree windows, it... more

Marius Hills Pit -- Lava Tube Skylight?

The Marius Hills pit is a possible skylight in a lava tube in an ancient volcanic region of the Moon called the Marius Hills. This image was taken by NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background. ARC-2011-ACD10-0037-210

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background.

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background. ARC-2011-ACD10-0037-211

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background.

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background. ARC-2011-ACD10-0037-212

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background.

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background. ARC-2011-ACD10-0037-213

Construction of the new NASA Ames Green Building dubbed Sustainability Base located on the Ames Research Center campus at Moffett Field, CA. Skylight and piping on roof, Hangar One in background.