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Topic: shuttles

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199
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2015
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2015
364 media by topicpage 1 of 4
Weaver's Shuttle

Weaver's Shuttle

Made in Byzantine Egypt

Shuttle
Shuttle (navette)

Shuttle (navette)

Mathieu Coiny fils (born 1723, master 1755, recorded 1788)

Shuttle (navette)

Shuttle (navette)

Mathieu Coiny fils (born 1723, master 1755, recorded 1788)

Shuttles, George W - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second Infantry, A, S-St

Shuttles, George W - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second ...

Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations

Shuttles, Joseph W - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second Infantry, A, S-St

Shuttles, Joseph W - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second ...

Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations

Rare view of two space shuttles on adjacent KSC Launch Complex (LC) 39 pads

Rare view of two space shuttles on adjacent KSC Launch Complex (LC) 39...

S90-48650 (5 Sept 1990) --- This rare view shows two space shuttles on adjacent pads at Launch Complex 39 with the Rotating Service Structures (RSR) retracted. Space Shuttle Columbia (foreground) is on Pad A wh... more

A ferry shuttles crew members between the shore and the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (CVN-72)

A ferry shuttles crew members between the shore and the nuclear-powere...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Rio De Janeiro Country: Brazil (BRA) Scene Camera Operator: Don S. Montgomery Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digita... more

Maintenance vehicles cross the end of Runway 5 on Rogers Dry Lake. The dry lake, which covers more than 60 square miles, has 17 runways that provide ample landing space for test aircraft, space shuttles and aircraft unable to make a normal landing due to damage or equipment failure

Maintenance vehicles cross the end of Runway 5 on Rogers Dry Lake. The...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Edwards Air Force Base State: California (CA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: CMSGT Donald Sutherland Release Sta... more

Bill Harter from Indianola shuttles materials and personnel along the newly formed banks at the Water Works Treatment Plant.(Exact date unknown)

Bill Harter from Indianola shuttles materials and personnel along the ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Des Moines State: Iowa (IA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

Bill Harter from Indianola shuttles materials and personnel along the newly formed banks at the Water Works Treatment Plant.(Exact Date Unknown)

Bill Harter from Indianola shuttles materials and personnel along the ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Des Moines State: Iowa (IA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

Cape Canaveral, Florida as seen from STS-66 Atlantis

Cape Canaveral, Florida as seen from STS-66 Atlantis

This nadir photograph of the Cape Canaveral area on Florida's eastern coast was taken by the STS-66 crew in November, 1994. The Space Shuttle Vehicle Assembly area and the runways used by the returning Shuttles... more

STS064-47-035 - STS-064 - GAS canister G-254

STS064-47-035 - STS-064 - GAS canister G-254

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation of Getaway Special (GAS) canister G-254 on the Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay during STS-64. GAS canisters are small, ... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (foreground) which is used to transport Space Shuttles to the pads KSC00pp0737

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (foreground) which is used to transport Space Shuttles to the pads KSC-00pp0737

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC-00pp0738

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-00PP-0741

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (left) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pads. Pad A can be seen in the background. KSC-92PC-2259

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage point. The roadway leading to the tour stop runs next to the crawlerway (right) which is used to transport Space Shuttles from the Vehicle Assembly Building (background) to the pads KSC00pp0738

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Com...

This aerial view is of a tour stop on the KSC bus tour, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry. This stop allows visitors to view and photograph Pads A and B in Launch Complex 39 from an elevated vantage poin... more

Miss Jennifer Millard, a fourth grade teacher at Colombia School, McGuire Air Force Base (AFB), New Jersey (NJ), watches on as students Molly Marbut and Earvin Casciano sign a sympathy card for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) family. Colombia is one of four schools at McGuire AFB named after Space Shuttles. The schools were renamed in 1986 after the Challenger disaster

Miss Jennifer Millard, a fourth grade teacher at Colombia School, McGu...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcguire Air Force Base State: New Jersey (NJ) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Scott H. Spitzer, CIV Release Statu... more

U.S. Marine Corps MAJ. GEN., retired, Charles Bolden, Jr. (right) spends time with U.S. Army MASTER SGT. Pagan along with other soldiers of the U.S. Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) during African American history month. GEN. Bolden's many accomplishments include being the first African American Marine to serve as a Space Shuttle pilot and commander for NASA, he flew four missions aboard the space shuttles Columbia, Discovery and Atlantis. He also assisted in deploying the Hubble Space Telescope and was a U.S. Navy aviator with more than 100 combat missions in South Asia. General Bolden also served as Deputy Commandant of Midshipmen at the U. S. Naval Academy. (U.S. Army PHOTO by Chris...

U.S. Marine Corps MAJ. GEN., retired, Charles Bolden, Jr. (right) spen...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: U.S. Marine Corps MAJ. GEN., retired, Charles Bolden, Jr. (right) spends time with U.S. Army MASTER SGT. Pagan along with other ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center.  At right is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1771

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances h... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center.   At left is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team, and at center is Martin Wilson, manager of the TPS operations.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1775

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center.   Near the center is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center.  At left is Martin Wilson, manager of the TPS operations.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1770

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center tour the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center. The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1774

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at KSC after Hurricane Frances hit the east coast of Central Florida and Kennedy Space Center.   Near the center is astronaut Scott Altmann, a member of the team.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  Equipment and materials that survived the storm have been relocated to the RLV hangar near the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. KSC-04pd1773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team f...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of a hurricane assessment team from Johnson Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center observe the damage to the roof of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) Facility at ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, Terri McCall cleans up equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1783

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Terri McCall c...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Terri McCall cleans up equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The facility, which creates the TPS tiles,... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills stores equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in the RLV hangar at KSC.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment has been moved to the hangar.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1779

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills stores equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in the RLV hangar at KSC. The TPSF, which cr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Beth Smith (left) and Theresa Haygood unwrap equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1781

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Beth Smith (left) and Theresa Haygood unwrap equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Frank Rhodes and Lynn Rosenbauer look at wrapped material removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1782

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Frank Rhodes and Lynn Rosenbauer look at wrapped material removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1785

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harringt...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Matt Carter (left) and Mike Sherman set up racks to hold equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1784

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers Matt Carter (left) and Mike Sherman set up racks to hold equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection Sys... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance worker Steve Mitchell unpacks equipment that was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1780

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance worker Steve Mitchell unpacks equipment that was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers set up shelves for equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) and now being stored in the hangar.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1792

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, United Space Alliance workers set up shelves for equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) and now being stor... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty carry out equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment is being moved to the RLV hangar at KSC.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1777

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty carry out equipment from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, bl... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC.  The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1793

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Janet Mills works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC. The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (T... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Columbia debris hangar at KSC, a United Space Alliance worker lines up air heaters salvaged from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in order to dry them out.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1778

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia debris hangar at KSC, a ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia debris hangar at KSC, a United Space Alliance worker lines up air heaters salvaged from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in order to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged facility.  The TPSF,  which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1790

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). A temporary tile shop has been set up in the R... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty clean up hurricane debris inside the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  Much of the roof was torn off by Hurricane Frances as it passed over Central Florida during the Labor Day weekend.  Undamaged equipment has been moved to the RLV hangar at KSC.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1776

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance workers Dallas Lewis (left) and Damon Petty clean up hurricane debris inside the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Much of the roof was torn off by ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1786

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harring...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Steve Harrington talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged facility.  The TPSF,  which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1791

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines from the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). A temporary tile shop has been set up in the R... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  United Space Alliance worker  Kathy Evans works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC.  The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1794

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Kathy Evan...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - United Space Alliance worker Kathy Evans works on equipment in the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar at KSC. The hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF).  Here United Space Alliance worker Bab Jarosz works with the 30-needle sewing machines.  The TPSF,  which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1789

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A temporary tile shop has been set up in...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A temporary tile shop has been set up in the RLV hangar at KSC after equipment was removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF). Here United Space ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RLV hangar at KSC, Kevin Harrington, manager of Softgoods Production, talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) now being stored in the hangar.  The facility, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof due to Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  The maximum wind at the surface from Hurricane Frances was 94 mph from the northeast at 6:40 a.m. on Sunday, September 5.  It was recorded at a weather tower located on the east shore of the Mosquito Lagoon near the Cape Canaveral National Seashore.  The highest sustained wind at KSC was 68 mph. KSC-04pd1788

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Kevin Harringt...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RLV hangar at KSC, Kevin Harrington, manager of Softgoods Production, talks to workers about the equipment removed from the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  -  NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar.  At left are United Space Alliance technicians Shelly Kipp and Eric Moss.  O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1843

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (righ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar. At left are United Space Alliance technicians Sh... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Looking at damage inside the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility are KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (left) and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy (right).  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Readdy and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane.  The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1851

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage inside the hurricane-r...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage inside the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility are KSC Director of Spaceport Services Scott Kerr (left) and NASA Associate Administrator of Spac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  -  United Space Alliance technician Shelly Kipp (right) shows some of the material salvaged from the storm-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left).  Martin Wilson (center), manager of TPS operations for USA, looks on.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane.  Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1845

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - United Space Alliance technician Shel...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - United Space Alliance technician Shelly Kipp (right) shows some of the material salvaged from the storm-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) to NASA Administrator S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar.  AT right is Martin Wilson, manager of TPS operations for United Space Alliance.  O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage.  However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1842

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe looks at...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe looks at equipment moved from the Thermal Protection System Facility to the RLV Hangar. AT right is Martin Wilson, manager of TPS operations for Un... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Martin Wilson (far left), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), leads NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (second from left) on a tour of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane.  The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1849

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (far left), manager of The...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Martin Wilson (far left), manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance (USA), leads NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (second from left) on a tour ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  From left, Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance, briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of the Spaceport Services Scott Kerr, NASA Associate Administrator of the Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy, and Center Director James Kennedy (right) on the temporary tile shop set up in the RLV hangar.  O’Keefe and Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from Hurricane Frances. The Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF), which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof in the storm, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5. Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the hangar. NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters -- Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft, awaiting launch in October, were well protected and unharmed. KSC-04pd1839

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Martin Wilson, manager of The...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From left, Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System (TPS) operations for United Space Alliance, briefs NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, KSC Director of the Spaceport Ser... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Looking at damage on the second floor of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) are (from left) Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production, TPSF ; Martin Wilson, manager of Thermal Protection System operations for USA; Scott Kerr, KSC director of Spaceport Services; and James Kennedy, Center director.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, is almost totally unserviceable at this time after losing approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4-5.  Undamaged equipment was removed from the TPSF and stored in the RLV hangar. NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and NASA Associate Administrator of  Space Operations Mission Directorate William Readdy are visiting KSC to survey the damage sustained by KSC facilities from the hurricane.  The Labor Day storm also caused significant damage to the Vehicle Assembly Building and Processing Control Center.  Additionally, the Operations and Checkout Building, Vertical Processing Facility, Hangar AE, Hangar S and Hangar AF Small Parts Facility each received substantial damage. However, well-protected and unharmed were NASA’s three Space Shuttle orbiters - Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour - along with the Shuttle launch pads, all of the critical flight hardware for the orbiters and the International Space Station, and NASA’s Swift spacecraft that is awaiting launch in October. KSC-04pd1852

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage on the second floor of...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking at damage on the second floor of the hurricane-ravaged Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) are (from left) Kevin Harrington, manager of Soft Goods Production, TPSF ; ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers attempt to secure the roof of the Tile Shop in the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in preparation for Hurricane Jeanne, which is expected to impact Central Florida Sunday.  The TPSF, which creates the TPS tiles, blankets and all the internal thermal control systems for the Space Shuttles, lost approximately 35 percent of its roof during Hurricane Frances, which blew across Central Florida Sept. 4.  Jeanne is the fourth hurricane in 45 days to make landfall somewhere in the state. KSC-04pd1902

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers attempt to secure the roof of the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers attempt to secure the roof of the Tile Shop in the Thermal Protection System Facility (TPSF) in preparation for Hurricane Jeanne, which is expected to impact Central Florida... more

Royal Australian Navy (RAN) deck department Sailors, aboard the Long Range Escort Frigate Her Majestys Australian Ship (HMAS) ADELAIDE (FFG 01), make fal preparations before pullg alongside the Sacramento Class Fast Combat Support Ship USS SEATTLE (AOE 3) (center) and the Wasp Class Amphibious Assault Ship USS ESSEX (LHD 2) (left) durg a Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP) operation the Northern Persian Gulf. A US Navy (USN) MH-60S Knighthawk helicopter, Helicopter Combat Support Squadron 8 (HC-8), Dragon Whales, Naval Air Station (NAS) Norfolk, Virgia (VA), shuttles between the ships. The ADELAIDE, home ported Garden Island, Western Australia, is conductg jot operations...

Royal Australian Navy (RAN) deck department Sailors, aboard the Long R...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: Royal Australian Navy (RAN) deck department Sailors, aboard the Long Range Escort Frigate Her Majestys Australian Ship (HMAS) AD... more

S115E05305 - STS-115 - Survey of the TPS on the STS-115 Space Shuttle Atlantis

S115E05305 - STS-115 - Survey of the TPS on the STS-115 Space Shuttle ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: While working to survey the thermal protection system on the Space Shuttle Atlantis, the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), attached to the Remote Manip... more

S115E05306 - STS-115 - Survey of the TPS on the STS-115 Space Shuttle Atlantis

S115E05306 - STS-115 - Survey of the TPS on the STS-115 Space Shuttle ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: While working to survey the Thermal Protection System (TPS) on the Space Shuttle Atlantis, the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS), attached to the Remote... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens stops in front of one of the cabs used to navigate the crawler.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0060

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Cleme... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens talks to the media and invited guests (behind him) Rick Drollinger (blue shirt), whose father Richard was director of engineering at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965; Philip Koehring Jr. (on right), whose father was project manager at Marion; and Koehring’s sons Doug and John.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0053

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Cleme... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, Philip Koehring Jr. (left) meets Bill Clemens.  Koehring represented his father, who was project manager at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, Philip Koehring Jr. (left) meets B... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ride on and photograph one of the crawlers up close.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0061

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ri... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, three former crawler workers tour one of the crawlers still in use.  From the top are Sylvan “Skip” Montagna, Fred Renaud and Fred Wallace.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0059

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, three former crawler workers tour ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, retired crawler workers meet for the celebration.  At left is Bill Clemens talking with Fred Renaud and his wife, Patricia. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, retired crawler workers meet for t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler driver Fred Renaud gets a close look at one of the crawlers still in use.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0058

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler driver Fred Renaud ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Clemens (right) introduces Philip Koehring Jr., whose father was project manager at the Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965.   Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0054

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, former crawler engineer Bill Cleme... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ride on and photograph one of the crawlers up close.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0062

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, media get a rare opportunity to ri... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, invited guests mingle in front of one of the crawlers still in use.  From left are Sylvan “Skip” Montagna, Patricia and Fred Renaud, Fred Wallace and Bill Clemens.  Philip Koehring and his brothers Doug(white shirt) and John (light blue shirt) and Rick Drollinger are on the right.  Philip Koehring Sr. was project manager at the Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965.  Drollinger’s father, Richard, was director of engineering at Marion. Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0056

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, invited guests mingle in front of ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, Rick Drollinger (center) and John Koehring get a close look at one of the crawlers still in use.  Drollinger’s father, Richard, was director of engineering at Marion Power Shovel Co. in Ohio where the crawlers were initially built in 1965.  Koehring is the son of Philip Koehring Sr., who was project manager at Marion.  Media representatives and invited guests had the opportunity to tour one of NASA's two crawlers. This included the driver cab and engine room.  Guests included current drivers and operators, as well as drivers from the Apollo Program.  In January 1966, the crawler completed its first successful move with a 10.6-million-pound launch umbilical tower. It moved three-quarters of a mile in about nine hours. Throughout 40 years of service, the two crawlers have moved more than 3,500 miles and carried seven vehicles. KSC-06pd0057

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the crawler transporter used for moving space shuttles to the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s launch pads, Rick Drollinger (center) and John ... more

The U.S. Navy Military Sealift Command, Mercy Class Hospital Ship USNS MERCY (T-AH 19), sits on the horizon, in the Celebes Sea as transport boat"BAND-AID-ONE"shuttles patients and crew from ship to shore during a humanitarian and civic assistance deployment to Tarakan, Indonesia on Aug. 14, 2006.(U.S. Navy photo by CHIEF Mass Communication SPECIALIST Edward G. Martens) (Released)

The U.S. Navy Military Sealift Command, Mercy Class Hospital Ship USNS...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: MCC Edward G. Martens, USN Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from right) joins workers and officials after the ceremony that reactivated the entry into this crew exploration vehicle (CEV) environment.  During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Operations and Checkout Build...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from right) joins workers and officials after the ceremony that reactivated the entry into this cre... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  NASA officials cut the ribbon to officially reactivate the Operations and Checkout Building's west door as entry to the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) environment.   From left are Russell Romanella, director of the ISS Payload and Processing Directorate; Conrad Nagel, consultant for Space Florida; Jim Kennedy, director of KSC; Adrian Lafitte, director of government relations for Lockheed Martin; Mark Jager, program manager of Checkout, Assembly, Payloads Processing Services with Boeing; and Lynda Weatherman, with the Economic Development Commission.   During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2222

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials cut the ribbon to officia...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials cut the ribbon to officially reactivate the Operations and Checkout Building's west door as entry to the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) environment. From left are ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At right, Kent Beringer, manager of facilities with Boeing, briefs Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from left at front) and other officials about use of the area dedicated for the crew exploration vehicle in the Operations and Checkout Building.  The briefing followed an official ribbon-cutting that reactivated the entry into the area.  During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2226

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At right, Kent Beringer, manager of faci...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At right, Kent Beringer, manager of facilities with Boeing, briefs Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from left at front) and other officials about use of the area dedicated for t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At right, Kent Beringer, manager of facilities with Boeing, briefs Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from left at front) and other officials about use of the area dedicated for the crew exploration vehicle in the Operations and Checkout Building.  The briefing followed an official ribbon-cutting that reactivated the entry into the area.   During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2225

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At right, Kent Beringer, manager of faci...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At right, Kent Beringer, manager of facilities with Boeing, briefs Center Director Jim Kennedy (second from left at front) and other officials about use of the area dedicated for t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers mingle around the west door entry to the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) environment in the Operations and Checkout Building.  A ribbon-cutting officially reactivated the entry.    During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2223

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers mingle around the west door entr...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers mingle around the west door entry to the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) environment in the Operations and Checkout Building. A ribbon-cutting officially reactivated the en... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Following  ribbon-cutting ceremony, workers and officials wait outside the west door to the Operations and Checkout Building for its reactivation as the entry into the crew exploration vehicle environment.  During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2219

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Following ribbon-cutting ceremony, work...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Following ribbon-cutting ceremony, workers and officials wait outside the west door to the Operations and Checkout Building for its reactivation as the entry into the crew explora... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A ribbon-cutting at NASA's Kennedy Space Center officially reactivated the Operations and Checkout Building's west door as entry to the crew exploration vehicle environment.  At the podium is Russell Romanella, who opened the ceremony.  Romanella is director of the ISS Payload and Processing Directorate.  Seated at right are Conrad Nagel, consultant for Space Florida; Jim Kennedy, director of KSC; Adrian Lafitte, director of government relations for Lockheed Martin; Mark Jager, program manager of Checkout, Assembly, Payloads Processing Services with Boeing; and Lynda Weatherman, with the Economic Development Commission.  During the rest of the decade, KSC will transition from launching space shuttles to launching new vehicles in NASA’s Vision For Space Exploration. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2218

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A ribbon-cutting at NASA's Kennedy Space...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A ribbon-cutting at NASA's Kennedy Space Center officially reactivated the Operations and Checkout Building's west door as entry to the crew exploration vehicle environment. At th... more

U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1ST Class Andrew Breton (left) assists Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) AIRMAN Chris Brewer with the maintenance on one of the four catapult shuttles aboard the Kitty Hawk Class Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) on Jan. 24, 2007, during fleet activities in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication SPECIALIST SEAMAN Jimmy C. Pan) (RELEASED)

U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1ST Class Andrew Breto...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Yokosuka State: Kanagawa Prefecture Country: Japan (JPN) Scene Camera Operator: MCSN Jimmy C. Pan, USN Release Status: Released to Public Combin... more

U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) AIRMAN Chris Brewer uses a grease gun to lubricate one of the four catapult shuttles aboard the Kitty Hawk Class Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) on Jan. 24, 2007, during fleet activities in Yokosuka, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan.  (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication SPECIALIST SEAMAN Jimmy C. Pan) (RELEASED)

U.S. Navy Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) AIRMAN Chris Brewer us...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Yokosuka State: Kanagawa Prefecture Country: Japan (JPN) Scene Camera Operator: MCSN Jimmy C. Pan, USN Release Status: Released to Public Combin... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-125 Mission Specialist Mike Good, Pilot Gregory C. Johnson, Commander Scott Altman and Mission Specialist John Grunsfeld look at a reinforced carbon-carbon panel. The RCC panels are part of the thermal protection system used on space shuttles.  The crew is at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with hardware and equipment for the mission.  Atlantis is targeted to launch on the STS-125 Hubble Servicing Mission 4 on Oct. 8.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1941

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's K...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-125 Mission Specialist Mike Good, Pilot Gregory C. Johnson, Commander Scott Altman and Mission Specialist John Grun... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a technician shows a reinforced carbon-carbon panel to STS-125 Mission Specialists Mike Massimino (left) and Mike Good.  The RCC panels are part of the thermal protection system used on space shuttles.  The crew is at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, which provides hands-on experience with hardware and equipment for the mission.   Atlantis is targeted to launch on the STS-125 Hubble Servicing Mission 4 on Oct. 8.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1940

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Ken...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a technician shows a reinforced carbon-carbon panel to STS-125 Mission Specialists Mike Massimino (left) and Mike Good. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker places a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile in the oven.  The tile will be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to cure the ceramic coating, part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles. BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1966

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker places a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile in the oven. The tile will be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to c... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker holds one of the Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tiles being prepared for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1963

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker holds one of the Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tiles being prepared for installation on space shuttles. BRI-18 i... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile bakes in a 2,200-degree oven to cure the ceramic coating.  The baking is part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1968

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile bakes in a 2,200-degree oven to cure the ceramic coating. The baking is part of the ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker reaches for the door to close the oven with the Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile inside.  The tile will be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to cure the ceramic coating, part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1967

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker reaches for the door to close the oven with the Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile inside. The tile will be bake... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile is ready to be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to cure the ceramic coating, part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1964

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile is ready to be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to cure the ceramic coating, part of... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile still glows after being baked in a 2,200-degree oven.  The baking is part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.   BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1970

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile still glows after being baked in a 2,200-degree oven. The baking is part of the proc... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker is ready to place a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile in the oven.  The tile will be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit to cure the ceramic coating, part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1965

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker is ready to place a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile in the oven. The tile will be baked at 2,200 degrees Fahr... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker removes a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile from a 2,200-degree oven.  The baking is part of the process to prepare the tiles for installation on space shuttles.  BRI-18 is the strongest material used for thermal insulation on the orbiters and, when coated to produce toughened unipiece fibrous insulation, provides a tile with extremely high-impact resistance.  It is replacing other tiles on areas of the vehicle where impact risk is high, such as the landing gear doors, the wing leading edge and the external tank doors. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-08pd1969

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the tile shop at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, a worker removes a Boeing Replacement Insulation 18, or BRI-18, tile from a 2,200-degree oven. The baking is part of the process to prep... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  An alligator seeks higher ground alongside a road at NASA's Kennedy Space Center during the onslaught of Tropical Storm Fay.  The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2428

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An alligator seeks higher ground alongside a r...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An alligator seeks higher ground alongside a road at NASA's Kennedy Space Center during the onslaught of Tropical Storm Fay. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled of... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Wind and rain from Tropical Storm Fay pummel the area near the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2424

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wind and rain from Tropical Storm Fay pummel...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wind and rain from Tropical Storm Fay pummel the area near the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offsh... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    The median of one of the roads on NASA's Kennedy Space Center is flooded from Tropical Storm Fay.  An emergency vehicle illustrates the flooding on the road as well.  The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2427

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The median of one of the roads on NASA's Ken...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The median of one of the roads on NASA's Kennedy Space Center is flooded from Tropical Storm Fay. An emergency vehicle illustrates the flooding on the road as well. The storm passed ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, this alligator was spotted cruising the flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Fay.  The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2429

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, this alligator...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center, this alligator was spotted cruising the flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Fay. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, br... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the roadside canals and surrounding grounds are flooded at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-08pd2431

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the roadside canals...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the roadside canals and surrounding grounds are flooded at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The storm passed ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   Debris covers a road eroded by Tropical Storm Fay near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2422

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Debris covers a road eroded by Tropical Storm...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Debris covers a road eroded by Tropical Storm Fay near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with i... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the ground is flooded on a road alongside the turn basin at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, bringing with it heavy rain and tropical storm force wind.  Kennedy closed Aug. 19 because of Fay and reopened for normal operations Aug. 22.  Based on initial assessments, there was no damage to space flight hardware, such as the space shuttles and Hubble Space Telescope equipment. Some facilities did sustain minor damage.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd2430

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the ground is flood...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Due to Tropical Storm Fay, the ground is flooded on a road alongside the turn basin at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The storm passed over the center Aug. 20 and then stalled offshore, b... more