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The Presentation in the Temple, plate four from the Life of the Virgin and Christ
Scipio Africanus Minor and his good sense, wisdom, about warfare
The Sense of Hearing; verso: light sketch of a woman's head and an arm
Sense of Smell (copy) Jan Pietersz Saenredam
Hans von Aachen - The Sense of Hearing

Hans von Aachen - The Sense of Hearing

Circle of Joseph Heintz the Elder (Swiss, Basel 1564–1609 Prague)

Hendrick Goltzius - Sense of Smell (copy), 15th century

Hendrick Goltzius - Sense of Smell (copy), 15th century

Anonymous, Netherlandish, 16th century

A genius on a globe flying above a landscape.
The Sense of Hearing; verso: light sketch of a woman's head and an arm
The Sense of Sight

The Sense of Sight

Juan Dò (Spanish, 1604?–?1656)

Rembrandt van Rijn - Beggar man and beggar woman conversing.
Edme Bouchardon - The Sense of Smell
The sense of sight
Edme Bouchardon - The Sense of Smell

Edme Bouchardon - The Sense of Smell

Edme Bouchardon (French, Chaumont 1698–1762 Paris)

To the public. Whereas advertisements were published yesterday to convene the inhabitants to take their sense on the expediency of a law to elect our representatives by ballot ... This is therefore to notify all the inhabitants of this City and

To the public. Whereas advertisements were published yesterday to conv...

Photostat. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 103, Folder 32.

Advertisement. Whereas a small number of persons met last night in a private manner, at the house of Mr. Bolton, in order to nominate persons to take the sense of the inhabitants, --- whether an importation shall take place, notwithstanding the
Committee Chamber, July 13, 1774. The public are hereby requested to attend at the Coffee-House, on Tuesday next at XII o 'Clock to Signify their sense of the resolves entered into by the Committee of Correspondence, in New-York, and of the dele

Committee Chamber, July 13, 1774. The public are hereby requested to a...

Imprint 3.; On verso: S; July13, 1774. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 106, Folder 18.

To the respectable public. We conceive the sense of our fellow citizens, relative to the delegates to represent them at the proposed congress, (notwithstanding the proceedings of yesterday at the Coffee-House) remains so uncertain, that until th

To the respectable public. We conceive the sense of our fellow citizen...

Imprint 3.; On verso: S; July 20, 1774. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 106, Folder 21.

To the publick. The long expected Tea Ship arrived last night at Sandy-Hook, but the pilot would not bring up the Captain till the sense of the City was known. The committee were immediately informed of her arrival, and that the Captain solicits

To the publick. The long expected Tea Ship arrived last night at Sandy...

Imprint 3.; Tea.; On verso: Apr 19, 1774. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 106, Folder 4.

portrait from "[The Works of George, Lord Lyttelton, ... now first collected together: with some other pieces never before printed. Published by G. E. Ayscough. (Additions to Lord Lyttelton's works, being two essays from Common Sense, and other poems.)]"

portrait from "[The Works of George, Lord Lyttelton, ... now first col...

This image has been taken from scan 000014 from "[The Works of George, Lord Lyttelton, ... now first collected together: with some other pieces never before printed. Published by G. E. Ayscough. (Additions to L... More

Plain truth; addressed to the inhabitants of America, containing, remarks on a late pamphlet, entitled Common sense: ... / written by Candidus.

Plain truth; addressed to the inhabitants of America, containing, rema...

Title page from published response to Thomas Paine's Common Sense.

The American Crisis. by the author of Common Sense [Thomas Paine] "These are the times that try men's souls: the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country..."

The American Crisis. by the author of Common Sense [Thomas Paine] "The...

Written in Dec. 1776. Reference copy may be in LOT 4412 DB This record contains unverified, old data from caption card. Caption card tracings: US Hist. Rev.; Broadsides [1776]; BI WORKS; RBD; Shelf.

Common sense; addressed to the inhabitants of America, on the following interesting subjects

Common sense; addressed to the inhabitants of America, on the followin...

Title page from Thomas Paine's Common Sense. Title from item. Caption continues: I. Of the origin and design of government in general, with concise remarks on the English Constitution. II. Of monarchy and hered... More

The American crisis (No. 1) By the author of Common sense. [Boston] Sold opposite the court house Queen Street [1776].

The American crisis (No. 1) By the author of Common sense. [Boston] So...

Positive Photostat.; Not in Evans.; Title.; Stamped on verso: 595. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. 2 duplicate copies Pri... More

Conversation Piece (The Sense of Smell)

Conversation Piece (The Sense of Smell)

Jan Ekels the Younger (Dutch, Amsterdam 1759–1793 Amsterdam)

Circular. Philadelphia. August 3, 1792. Sir. By the enclosed copy of the minutes of the proceedings of a general meeting of the Citizens of Philadelphia, you will preceive, that the Citizens are desirous to obtain information of the sense of the

Circular. Philadelphia. August 3, 1792. Sir. By the enclosed copy of t...

Imprint 2.; Political campaign.; Not in Evans. Page Order: Leaflet Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Colle... More

A friendly address to the inhabitants of the town of Providence. Friends, brethren, and fellow-citizens. Impressed by a sense of duty, and actuated by motives of charity to our fellow men, we the clergy of this town, beg leave to arrest your att
Gentlemen of the Senate and of the House of representatives. Called by your joint and unanimous suffrages, to fill the office of chief magistrate, under the constitution adopted by the people of this commonwealth, I repair with a full sense of m
That sense of duty which impels every man to cry out mad-dog on the approach of a rabid animal urges me to make this effort to guard the public against one of the most cunning scoundrels with whom I have ever come in contact. This man is Charles

That sense of duty which impels every man to cry out mad-dog on the ap...

Imprint 2.; Goldsborough, Charles W. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 190, Folder 22.

Chief Blanket (Second Phase)
Lectures on English grammar, In the order of nature, and by the application of common sense, to the use of words and sentences, according to a late method of teaching in Philadelphia Baltimore, and other cities, by D. Hewett .... [Washington, D.

Lectures on English grammar, In the order of nature, and by the applic...

Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 209, Folder 26.

City charter. As the president of the United States has designed Monday, the 15th instant, as the day for taking the sense of the people of Washington for or against the new code, and as there is another question on which the people of Washingto
The danger and the remedy. The excitement so wide spread and deeply seated in the South arises in a great degree from a sense of insecurity. While the slaveholding states maintained an equal power in the Senate, they could submit to much that wa

The danger and the remedy. The excitement so wide spread and deeply se...

Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 234, Folder 3.

To the people of the United States. Well founded apprehensions that the civilization of our state is in danger of being utterly overthrown, and an over-ruling sense of duty to ourselves, our posterity, and the country at large, impel us to make

To the people of the United States. Well founded apprehensions that th...

Printed on satin. Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 173, Folder 24.

A fable ... Harrison & Morton are in favor of a protective tariff in its fullest sense. President Cleveland is not! Consult your own interests and choose between them ... H. K. Thurber. [n. p. 1888].

A fable ... Harrison & Morton are in favor of a protective tariff in i...

Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. 3 duplicate copies Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 238, Folder 49. Copy scanned: 2

portrait from "Sense and sensibility"

portrait from "Sense and sensibility"

This image has been taken from scan 000260 from "Sense and sensibility". The title and subject terms of this image have been generated from tags, created by users of the British Library's flickr photostream.

Jane Austen from "Sense and sensibility"

Jane Austen from "Sense and sensibility"

This image has been taken from scan 000131 from "Sense and sensibility". The title and subject terms of this image have been generated from tags, created by users of the British Library's flickr photostream.

Senate leaders meet. Washington, D.C., June 6. Senate Republicans today adopted a resolution declaring that Congress should remain in session throughout the European War emergency. Twenty-one Republicans conferred for 45 minutes. Afterward, Senator McNary announced 'It was the unanimous sense of the conference that Congress should remain in session for the duration of the emergency.' Left to right in the picture: Senator Robert A. Taft, Republican of Ohio; Senator Styles Bridges, Republican of New Hampshire; Senator Charles McNary, Republican of Oregon; and Senator Arthur Vandenberg, Republican of Michigan
The canteen or the dive - in the name of decency and common sense, which is best for the American soldier? / Will Crawford.

The canteen or the dive - in the name of decency and common sense, whi...

Illustration shows an Army officer with a woman labeled "W.C.T.U." a clergyman, and a man labeled "Timid Legislator" standing in a doorway, viewing scenes in a canteen, where soldiers are playing chess and read... More

Anders Zorn - Dalecarlian peasant (Lavards Anders)
Sochu Maekawa no ame: Rain at Maekawa, Sochu.
Chickamauga Dam and powerhouse. Reception and display room at the Murfreesboro cooperative, typical of many similar structures. Note that the main office and the reception room are not separated except by the reception desk to enourage familiarity between employees and members of the cooperative, and to promote a sense of ownership on the part of the latter
Locked door of shack. Mays Avenue camp, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The sense of possession is just as strong in this downtrodden group as in any other. See general caption no. 21
One way to increase tire life--and to do your part in the saving of rubber for the forces of fighting to defend your right to drive in freedom over the roads of this democracy is to keep the pressure right. This driver isn't thinking of war, however, as he checks his tire pressure. He's just using common sense as he takes a few moments to make certain that costly carelessness will not rob him of tire mileage
Women in industry. Tool  production. Maybe it isn't Shakespeare, but it makes sense to the employees of this drill and tool plant who are manufacturing thousands of drills each day for use in all war production industries. Republic Drill and Tool Company, Chicago, Illinois
Tennessee Valley Authority. Railroad crews at Watts Bar Dam. The engineer, or "hog head" of a freight locomotive hauling materials for the building of TVA's Watts Bar Dam, oils the guides of the main driving rods of his engine. Long mechanical experience, practical railroad training and common sense are required for the job of running one of the big "hogs"
Tennessee Valley Authority. Railroad crews at Watts Bar Dam. A combination of long mechanical experience, practical railroad training and common sense is required for the job of running one of the big "hogs," or locomotives. This engineer handles a train which hauls materials for the building of TVA's Watts Bar Dam
Tennessee Valley Authority. Railroad crews at Watts Bar Dam. Boss of all the "shacks," or trainmen, on a freight or passenger run is the "skipper," or train conductor. His job demands practical railroad experience, executive ability and common sense. This freight conductor captains a train carrying materials for the building of TVA's Watts Bar Dam
Tennessee Valley Authority. Railroad crews at Watts Bar Dam. A combination of long mechanical experience, practical railroad training and common sense is required for the job of running one of the big "hogs," or locomotives. This engineer handles a train which hauls materials for the building of TVA's Watts Bar Dam
Health measures for low home temperatures. Common sense health rules must prevail in America's homes this winter so that lower room temperatures will entail no health risks. Before bathing youngsters, keep the bathroom door and window closed for an hour so that the room will retain all heat coming from the register. After the bath, see that the youngster wears a sweater for a little while
Good citizenship and plain common sense. This man is performing a duty every car owner owes to himself and to our fighting men. In having his car adjusted to prevent excessive tire wear--and in observing the simple rules that make tires last longer--he is making a valuable contribution to our war effort. The man who wastes rubber is a poor citizen and blind even to his own personal interests
New York, New York. Children of working mothers, who receive day care at the Greenwich House on Saturdays and after school hours, returning to this community center after a trip to the zoo or some other place of interest. A marked sense of group responsibility is manifest as they go through New York City's densest traffic zone safely
Kawase Hasui - Cloudy day at Mizuki, Ibaraki Prefecture (Mizuki no Komoribi)
Injected beam profile as seen by ion probe at 583 inches, without acceleration. Transistor amplifier used to sense signal; sweep speed: 200 microseconds/cm, trigger at injection on. Photograph taken May 1, 1956. Bevatron-1069

Injected beam profile as seen by ion probe at 583 inches, without acce...

Digital Preservation File Name and Format: 434-LB-6-XBD201304-02253.TIF Photographs Documenting Scientists, Special Events, and Nuclear Research Facilities, Instruments, and Projects at the Berkeley Lab

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meteorological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a m...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meteorological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a m...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meteorological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a m...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meteorological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a m...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meteorological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A close-up view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a m...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A small amount of superconducting material seems to hang in the air in a laboratory.  A penny held by tweezers provides a sense of scale

A small amount of superconducting material seems to hang in the air in...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Monmouth State: New Jersey (NJ) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: David Sanderson Release Status: Released to ... More

Range :  60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Galileo spacecraft.The map shows the turbulent, cloudy middle atmosphere some 30-33 miles above the surface, 6-10 miles below the visible cloudtops.  The image to the left  shows the radiant heat from the lower atmosphere (about 400 degrees F) ahining through the sulfuric acid clouds, which appear as much as 10 times darker than the bright gaps between clouds.  This cloud layer is at about 170 degrees F, at a pressure about 1/2 Earth's atmospheric pressure.  About 2/3 of the dark hemisphere is visible, centered on longitude 350 West, with bright slsivers of daylit high clouds visible at top and bottom left.  The right image, a modified negative, represents what scientists believe would be the visual appearance of this mid-level cloud deck in daylight, with the clouds reflecting sunlight instead of clocking out infrared from the hot planet and lower atmosphere.  Near the  equator, the clouds appear fluffy and clocky; farther north, they are stretched out into East-West filaments by winds estimated at more than 150 mph, while the poles are capped by thick clouds at this altitude.  The Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on the Galileo is a combined mapping (imaging) and spectral instrument.  It can sense 408 contiguous wavelengths from 0.7 microns (deep red) to 5.2 microns, and can construct a map or image by mechanical scanning.  It can spectroscopic-ally analyze atmospheres and surfaces and construct thermal and chemical maps. ARC-1990-A91-2002

Range : 60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed...

Range : 60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Galileo spacecraft.The ... More

Range :  60,000 miles This image is a false-color version of a near- infrared map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard Galileo.  Taken at an infrared wavelength of 2.3 microns (about three times the longest wavelength visible to the human eye) the map shows the turbulent, cloudy middle atmosphere some 30-33 miles above the surface, 6-10 miles below the visible cloudtops.  The image shows the radiant heat from the lower atmosphere (about 400 degrees F) shining through the sulfuric acid clouds, which appear as much as 10 times darker than the bright gaps between clouds.  The colors indicate relative cloud transparency; white and red show thin cloud regions, while black and blue represent relatively this clouds.  This cloud layer is at about 170 degrees F., at a pressure about 1/2 Earth's atmospheric pressure.  About 2/3 of the dark hemisphere is visible, centered on longitude 350 West, with bright slivers of daylit high clouds visible at top and bottom left.  Near the equator, the clouds appear fluffy and blocky; farther north, they are stretched out into East-West filaments by winds estimated at more than 150 mph, while the poles are capped by thick clouds at this altitude.  The Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on the Galileo is a combined mapping (imaging) and spectral instrument.  It can sense 408 contiguous wavelengths from 0.7 microns (deep red) to 5.2 microns, and can construct a map or image by mechanical scanning.  It can spectroscopic-ally analyze atmospheres and surfaces and construct thermal and chemical maps.  Designed and operated by scientists and engineers at the JPL, NIMS involves 15 scientists in the US, England and France. ARC-1990-AC91-2005

Range : 60,000 miles This image is a false-color version of a near- i...

Range : 60,000 miles This image is a false-color version of a near- infrared map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard Galileo. Taken at a... More

Range :  60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Galileo spacecraft.The map shows the turbulent, cloudy middle atmosphere some 30-33 miles above the surface, 6-10 miles below the visible cloudtops.  The image to the left  shows the radiant heat from the lower atmosphere (about 400 degrees F) ahining through the sulfuric acid clouds, which appear as much as 10 times darker than the bright gaps between clouds.  This cloud layer is at about 170 degrees F, at a pressure about 1/2 Earth's atmospheric pressure.  About 2/3 of the dark hemisphere is visible, centered on longitude 350 West, with bright slsivers of daylit high clouds visible at top and bottom left.  The right image, a modified negative, represents what scientists believe would be the visual appearance of this mid-level cloud deck in daylight, with the clouds reflecting sunlight instead of clocking out infrared from the hot planet and lower atmosphere.  Near the  equator, the clouds appear fluffy and clocky; farther north, they are stretched out into East-West filaments by winds estimated at more than 150 mph, while the poles are capped by thick clouds at this altitude.  The Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on the Galileo is a combined mapping (imaging) and spectral instrument.  It can sense 408 contiguous wavelengths from 0.7 microns (deep red) to 5.2 microns, and can construct a map or image by mechanical scanning.  It can spectroscopic-ally analyze atmospheres and surfaces and construct thermal and chemical maps. ARC-1990-A91-2001

Range : 60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed...

Range : 60,000 miles These images are two versions of a near-infrafed map of lower-level clouds on the night side of Venus, obtained by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Galileo spacecraft.The ... More

Range :  50,000 miles This multispectral map of Australia, and surrounding seas was obtained by the Galileo spacecraft's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer shortly after closest approach.  The image shows various ocean, land and atmospheric cloud features as they appear in three of the 408 infrared colors or wavelengths sensed by the instrument.  The wavelength of 0.873 micron, represented as blue in the photo, shows regions of enhanced liquid water absorption, i.e. the Pacific and Indian oceans.  The 0.984-micron band, represented as red, shows areas of enhanced ground reflection as on the Australian continent.  This wavelength is also s ensitive to the reflectivity of relatively thick clouds.  The 0.939-micron wavelength, shown as green, is a strong water-vapor-absorbing band, and is used to accentuate clouds lying above the strongly absorbing lower atmosphere.  When mixed with the red indicator of cloud reflection, the green produces a yellowish hue; this indicates thick clouds.  The distinctive purplish color off the northeast coast marks the unusually shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef and the Coral Sea.  Here the blue denoting water absorption combines with the red denoting reflection from coral and surface marine organisms to produce thiss unusual color.  The Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on the Galileo spacecraft is a combines mapping (imaging) and spectral instrument.  It can sense 408 contiguous wavelengths from 0.7 micron (deep red) to 5.2 microns, and can construct a map or image by mechanical scanning.  It can spectroscopically analyze atmospheres and surfaces and construct thermal and chemical maps. ARC-1990-AC91-2010

Range : 50,000 miles This multispectral map of Australia, and surroun...

Range : 50,000 miles This multispectral map of Australia, and surrounding seas was obtained by the Galileo spacecraft's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer shortly after closest approach. The image shows vario... More

A view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meterological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meterologi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meterological instrument used on naval vessels to sense and record windspeed and direction

A view of the Belfort type "F" wind indicating equipment, a meterologi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

Top frame: injected beam, which is not accepted as RF, is turned on. Sweep speed 200 microseconds/cm. Trigger at injection on; bottom frame: injected beam profile as seen by ion robe at 583-inches, without acceleration transistor amplifier used to sense s

Top frame: injected beam, which is not accepted as RF, is turned on. S...

Digital Preservation File Name and Format: 434-LB-6-XBD201304-02252.TIF Photographs Documenting Scientists, Special Events, and Nuclear Research Facilities, Instruments, and Projects at the Berkeley Lab

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1715

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Inves... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is ready for processing after being placed in its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1717

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is ready for processing after being placed in its workstand in the Operations a... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1713

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Inves... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is ready for processing after being placed in its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1716

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is ready for processing after being placed in its workstand in the Operations a... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1714

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is moved to its workstand in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Inves... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1719

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1718

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1720

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, is installed in the Spacelab module by Boeing technicians in the Operations and... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1813

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. In... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1814

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. In... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1812

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. In... More

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90 will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-97PC1815

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttl...

The Neurolab payload for STS-90, scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on April 2, 1998, undergoes further processing in the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC. In... More

STS-90 crew members study manuals and drawings for the mission's Neurolab payload during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the payload is undergoing processing. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-90 is scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from KSC on April 2. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system KSC-98pc149

STS-90 crew members study manuals and drawings for the mission's Neuro...

STS-90 crew members study manuals and drawings for the mission's Neurolab payload during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the pa... More

STS-90 Mission Specialist Dafydd "Dave" Rhys Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and back-up Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, M.D., Ph.D., with the National Space Development Agency of Japan, examine items to be used during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the Neurolab payload is undergoing processing. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-90 is scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from KSC on April 2. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system KSC-98pc146

STS-90 Mission Specialist Dafydd "Dave" Rhys Williams, M.D., with the ...

STS-90 Mission Specialist Dafydd "Dave" Rhys Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and back-up Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, M.D., Ph.D., with the National Space Development Agency of Japan, examin... More

STS-90 Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D., holds up a panel as one of the items used during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the Neurolab payload is undergoing processing. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-90 is scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from KSC on April 2. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system KSC-98pc147

STS-90 Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D., holds up a panel as ...

STS-90 Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D., holds up a panel as one of the items used during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, wh... More

STS-90 crew members check out the inside of the module for the mission's Neurolab payload during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the payload is undergoing processing. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-90 is scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from KSC on April 2. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system KSC-98pc148

STS-90 crew members check out the inside of the module for the mission...

STS-90 crew members check out the inside of the module for the mission's Neurolab payload during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, wher... More

STS-90 Payload Specialists James Pawelczyk, Ph.D. (at left), and Jay Buckey Jr., M.D., examine items to be used during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and Checkout Building, where the Neurolab payload is undergoing processing. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-90 is scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Columbia from KSC on April 2. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system KSC-98pc145

STS-90 Payload Specialists James Pawelczyk, Ph.D. (at left), and Jay B...

STS-90 Payload Specialists James Pawelczyk, Ph.D. (at left), and Jay Buckey Jr., M.D., examine items to be used during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's (KSC's) Operations and C... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians gather around the STS-90 Neurolab payload during weight and center-of-gravity measurements in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc268

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians gather around the STS-90 Neu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Technicians gather around the STS-90 Neurolab payload during weight and center-of-gravity measurements in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into its payload canister in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc269

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered i...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into its payload canister in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A technician looks at the STS-90 Neurolab payload as it is moved from its test stand in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc267

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A technician looks at the STS-90 Neurola...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A technician looks at the STS-90 Neurolab payload as it is moved from its test stand in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focu... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into its payload canister in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc270

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered i...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into its payload canister in KSC's Operations and Checkout Building. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of ... More

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc290

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo ba...

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects... More

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is prepared to be positioned into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc289

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is prepared to be positioned into the carg...

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is prepared to be positioned into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the eff... More

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc291

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo ba...

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is lowered into position into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects... More

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is positioned into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc292

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is positioned into the cargo bay of Space ...

The STS-90 Neurolab payload is positioned into the cargo bay of Space Shuttle Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgr... More

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. Investigations during the STS-90 Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc315

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface...

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at... More

Stacie Greene, an extravehicular activity trainer from Johnson Space Center, discusses the STS-90 Neurolab mission with Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan overlooking Columbia's payload bay. The crew of STS-90 participated in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. Investigations during the STS-90 Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. STS-90 is scheduled for launch on April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT KSC-98pc338

Stacie Greene, an extravehicular activity trainer from Johnson Space C...

Stacie Greene, an extravehicular activity trainer from Johnson Space Center, discusses the STS-90 Neurolab mission with Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan overlooking Columbia's payload bay. The crew of STS-90... More

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. Investigations during the STS-90 Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, are, left to right, Pilot Scott Altman; Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D.; Commander Richard Searfoss; Mission Specialists Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire; Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D.; and Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan KSC-98pc316

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface...

Members of the STS-90 crew participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at... More

STS-90 Mission Specialist Kathryn (Kay) Hire enjoys the crawl between Columbia and the white room that allows access to the orbiter. The crew of STS-90 recently participated in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in Kennedy Space Center's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. Investigations during the STS-90 Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. STS-90, which will be Hire's first Shuttle flight, is scheduled for launch on April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT KSC-98pc339

STS-90 Mission Specialist Kathryn (Kay) Hire enjoys the crawl between ...

STS-90 Mission Specialist Kathryn (Kay) Hire enjoys the crawl between Columbia and the white room that allows access to the orbiter. The crew of STS-90 recently participated in the Crew Equipment Interface Test... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload and four Getaway Specials (GAS) await payload bay door closure in the orbiter Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch in April, will include Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc343

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload and four Get...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-90 Neurolab payload and four Getaway Specials (GAS) await payload bay door closure in the orbiter Columbia today in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3. Investigations during... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its morning rollout past the newly opened tour stop, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry, to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primary payload on this nearly 17-day space flight. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc403

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its morning rollout past the newly opened tour stop, the Launch Complex 39 Observation Gantry, to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its morning rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primary payload on this nearly 17-day space flight. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc402

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its morning rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are th... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primary payload on this nearly 17-day space flight. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc387

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its ro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia begins its rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primary p... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primary payload on this nearly 17-day space flight. Investigations during the Neurolab mission will focus on the effects of microgravity on the nervous system. Specifically, experiments will study the adaptation of the vestibular system, the central nervous system, and the pathways that control the ability to sense location in the absence of gravity, as well as the effect of microgravity on a developing nervous system. The crew of STS-90, slated for launch April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT, includes Commander Richard Searfoss, Pilot Scott Altman, Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., and Kathryn (Kay) Hire, and Payload Specialists Jay Buckey, M.D., and James Pawelczyk, Ph.D KSC-98pc388

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Shuttle Columbia continues its rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-90 mission. The Neurolab experiments are the primar... More

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