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Topic: secrets

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2016
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2016
967 media by topicpage 1 of 10
Bando Hikosaburo III as Sugawara no Michizane, from the Kabuki play, "Sugawara's Secrets of Calligraphy" (Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami)

Bando Hikosaburo III as Sugawara no Michizane, from the Kabuki play, "...

Katsukawa Shun'ei (Japanese, 1762–1819) Edo period (1615–1868)

The secrets of Troppeau

The secrets of Troppeau

"The three chief autocratic sovereigns of Europe, all in military uniform and sword in hand, sit on a section of a map of the globe which undulates violently owing to the fires beneath it, which are blown by wi... more

Les quatre secrets.
Little Secrets

Little Secrets

Two small children on a swing. No copyright renewal. This record contains unverified, old data from caption card. Caption card tracings: Children at play; Swings; Children; Shelf.

The Case of Paul Beck, Rule-of-Thumb Detective: Cabinet Secrets
Secrets of the camouflage artists / by Helen Johns Kirtland, Leslie's staff correspondent.

Secrets of the camouflage artists / by Helen Johns Kirtland, Leslie's ...

Seven images taken on November 12, 1918 at the American camouflage factory at Dijon, France. Images show Col. Brenner, the commander of camouflage work in the American Army, with a "dummy" soldier; stone and gr... more

"Hitherto I Have Performed it Myself": Six Dead Secrets, Topsy-Turvy Tales

"Hitherto I Have Performed it Myself": Six Dead Secrets, Topsy-Turvy T...

William Heath Robinson (British, London 1872–1944 Highgate, London)

John W. Robbins of the Comptrollers General's Office holds the secrets of 1,000,000 Americans ... These secrets are in the form of packages containing the belongings of soldiers and Robbins task is to find surviving relatives and restore the packages to them

John W. Robbins of the Comptrollers General's Office holds the secrets...

Title from unverified caption data on negative or negative sleeve. Date based on date of negatives in same range. Gift; Harris & Ewing, Inc. 1955. General information about the Harris & Ewing Collection is avai... more

Historic Route 66 - Holding the Secrets of Route 66

Historic Route 66 - Holding the Secrets of Route 66

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Original Caption: The simple brick facade hides a mulitude of items that are a must see along Route 66. Location: Location: (35.327° N 112.878° W) Statu... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin removing the lower sections of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0700

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin re...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin removing the lower sections of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to sc... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers remove another section of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0701

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers remove a...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers remove another section of the canister surrounding NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cos... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin to remove the canister around the top of the NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0698

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin to...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers begin to remove the canister around the top of the NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cos... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers look over NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite after sections of the canister have been removed. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0703

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers look ove...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers look over NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite after sections of the canister have been removed. FUSE is scheduled to be l... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers check out the protective cover placed over the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0702

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers check ou...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers check out the protective cover placed over the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled to ... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers oversee the removal of the canister from the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe. FUSE is scheduled to be launched from CCAS June 23 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket KSC-99pp0699

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers oversee ...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers oversee the removal of the canister from the top of NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. FUSE is designed to scour the co... more

NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite sits ready for the fairing installation at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0717

NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite sits re...

NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite sits ready for the fairing installation at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boein... more

A worker in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watches as the first segment of the fairing is maneuvered around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. At the lower left in the photo can be seen a camera installed on the second stage of the rocket to record the separation of the fairing several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0720

A worker in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Sta...

A worker in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, watches as the first segment of the fairing is maneuvered around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The s... more

A camera is shown mounted on the second stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket scheduled to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite June 24 from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The camera will record the separation of the fairing encircling the satellite, which should occur several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0716

A camera is shown mounted on the second stage of the Boeing Delta II r...

A camera is shown mounted on the second stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket scheduled to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite June 24 from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Sta... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers oversee the lifting of the fairing (right) into the tower. At left is NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite around which the fairing will be fitted. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study hydrogen and deuterium to unlock the secrets of how the primordial chemical elements of which all stars, planets and life evolved, were created and distributed since the birth of the universe KSC-99pp0718

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers oversee the lif...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers oversee the lifting of the fairing (right) into the tower. At left is NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite around which the fairi... more

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. At the lower left can be seen a camera installed on the second stage of the rocket to record the separation of the fairing several minutes after launch. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0721

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Stat...

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is sch... more

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0719

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Stat...

Workers in the launch tower at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide the first segment of the fairing around NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. The satellite is sch... more

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (foreground) is partially covered by half of the fairing (behind it) that will protect it during launch. The satellite is scheduled for launch June 24 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. FUSE is designed to scour the cosmos for the fossil record of the origins of the universe hydrogen and deuterium. Scientists will use FUSE to study those elements to unlock the secrets of how galaxies evolve and to discover what the Universe was like when it was only a few minutes old KSC-99pp0722

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet ...

At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (foreground) is partially covered by half of the fairing (behind it) that will protect it during lau... more

STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), prepares to leave the T-38 jet aircraft that brought him to KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) are arriving for pre-launch activities. Tognini is making his inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0824

STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre Na...

STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), prepares to leave the T-38 jet aircraft that brought him to KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He and other c... more

The STS-93 crew leave the Shuttle Landing Facility after answering questions for the media and posing for photographers, whose shadows stretch across the SLF. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins (waving), Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. The crew arrived at KSC for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0830

The STS-93 crew leave the Shuttle Landing Facility after answering que...

The STS-93 crew leave the Shuttle Landing Facility after answering questions for the media and posing for photographers, whose shadows stretch across the SLF. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of... more

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins poses for photographers in the early morning sun after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0828

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins poses for photographers in the early m...

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins poses for photographers in the early morning sun after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other cre... more

After arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-93 crew speak to the media about their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Commander Eileen M. Collins. Hawley has the most Shuttle flights, this being his fifth. Collins is making her third flight (the first as a commander), Coleman is making her second flight, and Ashby and Tognini are making their first flights. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0827

After arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-93 crew speak...

After arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-93 crew speak to the media about their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spat... more

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins waves to spectators after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0822

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins waves to spectators after landing at K...

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins waves to spectators after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Missi... more

Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. greets STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins after her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (behind her). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0826

Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. greets STS-93 Commander Eileen M. C...

Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. greets STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins after her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (behind her). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey... more

STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. STS-93 is Ashby's inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0823

STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle ...

STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawl... more

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins peers into the eastern early morning sky after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0829

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins peers into the eastern early morning s...

STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins peers into the eastern early morning sky after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew member... more

STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) shows her sense of humor upon arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Coleman is making her second Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0825

STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) shows he...

STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) shows her sense of humor upon arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Eileen Col... more

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team poses with Astronauts (from left) Steven W. Lindsey, Nancy Jane Currie and Laurel B. Clark. The team arrived at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0884

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team poses with Astronau...

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team poses with Astronauts (from left) Steven W. Lindsey, Nancy Jane Currie and Laurel B. Clark. The team arrived at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station wi... more

Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0889

Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, Fi...

Upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton ... more

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0872

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations a...

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (sta... more

STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last meeting before launch of mission STS-93 on July 20. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0865

STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last ...

STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last meeting before launch of mission STS-93 on July 20. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of... more

Among those gathered at the VIP viewing site for the launch of STS-93 are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) and Donna Shalala, secretary , Department of Health and Human Services (far right). Also present is Chelsea Clinton. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0895

Among those gathered at the VIP viewing site for the launch of STS-93 ...

Among those gathered at the VIP viewing site for the launch of STS-93 are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) and Donna Shalala, secretary , Department of Health and Human Services (far right). Also pres... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves while a suit tech adjusts her boot, part of the launch and entry suit, during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0868

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Co...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves while a suit tech adjusts her boot, part of the launch and entry suit, during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mi... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0869

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Mic...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during fi... more

Space Shuttle Columbia catches the rising sun after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0862

Space Shuttle Columbia catches the rising sun after the rollback of th...

Space Shuttle Columbia catches the rising sun after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payl... more

The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back from Space Shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39-B, in preparation for launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0861

The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back from Space Shuttle Colum...

The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back from Space Shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39-B, in preparation for launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra ... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) waves after donning her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0871

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Cat...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) waves after donning her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission prima... more

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0886

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA ...

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Spac... more

Members of the U.S. World Cup Soccer Team pose with Astronauts Scott Parazynski, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie and NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin after the team's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. The team arrived with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0892

Members of the U.S. World Cup Soccer Team pose with Astronauts Scott P...

Members of the U.S. World Cup Soccer Team pose with Astronauts Scott Parazynski, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie and NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin after the team's a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the VIP Lounge, Apollo/Saturn V Center, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton gets ready to speak to the group gathered there before the launch of STS-93. At right is NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0893

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the VIP Lounge, Apollo/Saturn V Cente...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the VIP Lounge, Apollo/Saturn V Center, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton gets ready to speak to the group gathered there before the launch of STS-93. At right is NASA Administr... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) smiles after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0867

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Ste...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) smiles after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primaril... more

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronaut Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Waiting at left are Astronauts Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Steven W. Lindsey. Mrs. Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea (far right) are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0890

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronaut Nancy Jane C...

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronaut Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Waiting at left are Astronauts Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-... more

The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0866

The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout B...

The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Miss... more

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Next to Gold are (from left) Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings and Mrs. Goldin. Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0888

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greet...

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. Next to Gold are (from left) D... more

Space Shuttle Columbia, sitting on its mobile launcher platform, is framed against the early morning sky after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0863

Space Shuttle Columbia, sitting on its mobile launcher platform, is fr...

Space Shuttle Columbia, sitting on its mobile launcher platform, is framed against the early morning sky after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of... more

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station as her teammates look on. The team is at KSC to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93 scheduled for liftoff at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0885

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA ...

A member of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team is greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon her arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station as her teammates look on. The team is ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The group waiting in the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the launch of STS-93 pose for a photo. Among the spectators gathered are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Chelsea, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, astronauts, and attendees of a Women in Space forum, including Donna Shalala, secretary , Department of Health and Human Services. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0894

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The group waiting in the Apollo/Saturn V...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The group waiting in the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the launch of STS-93 pose for a photo. Among the spectators gathered are First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and her daughter, Che... more

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronauts (from left) Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station. She and her daughter, Chelsea (far right) are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0891

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronauts (from left)...

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by Astronauts (from left) Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper, Steven W. Lindsey, and Nancy Jane Currie upon Mrs. Clinton's arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral A... more

Generating her own attention waiting for the launch of STS-93 at the VIP viewing site is Chelsea Clinton, daughter of the President and Mrs. Clinton. The First Lady and Chelsea arrived earlier to view the launch. Much attention has been generated over STS-93 due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0897

Generating her own attention waiting for the launch of STS-93 at the V...

Generating her own attention waiting for the launch of STS-93 at the VIP viewing site is Chelsea Clinton, daughter of the President and Mrs. Clinton. The First Lady and Chelsea arrived earlier to view the launc... more

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0880

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, a...

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launc... more

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0879

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, a...

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton (right) and her daughter, Chelsea, are greeted by NASA Astronaut Scott E. Parazynski (left) upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station to view the launc... more

The rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on launch Pad 39-B reveals Space Shuttle Columbia on its mobile launcher platform, waiting for the launch of mission STS-93 on July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0864

The rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on launch Pad 39-B reve...

The rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on launch Pad 39-B reveals Space Shuttle Columbia on its mobile launcher platform, waiting for the launch of mission STS-93 on July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The prima... more

Members of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team were greeted upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station by Astronauts (right) Steven W. Lindsey, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Scott E. Parzynski. The team are here to view the launch of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes KSC-99pp0887

Members of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team were greeted upon th...

Members of the U.S. Women's World Cup Soccer Team were greeted upon their arrival at the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Station by Astronauts (right) Steven W. Lindsey, Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper and Sco... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) chats with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and others while waiting for the launch of STS-93. Much attention has been generated over STS-93 due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20 KSC-99pp0896

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, NASA Admi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin (right) chats with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and others while waiting for the launch of STS-93. Much attenti... more

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," which will transport them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0873

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," whic...

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," which will transport them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting a... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waits after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his helmet. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0870

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparatio...

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waits after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his helmet. STS-93 is a five-day m... more

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.)gets help donning his launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0920

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Buildi...

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.)gets help donning his launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Colu... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations for the second time. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0917

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Mic...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during fi... more

The STS-93 crew gathers a second time for a pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0914

The STS-93 crew gathers a second time for a pre-launch breakfast in th...

The STS-93 crew gathers a second time for a pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T... more

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) gets help with her launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0918

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Buildi...

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) gets help with her launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Co... more

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves after donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0919

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Buildi...

During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves after donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt ... more

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building for the second time enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0921

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations a...

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building for the second time enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After Space Shuttle Columbia's Ju... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins gets help donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0915

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Co...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins gets help donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the second time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waves after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his boot. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission KSC-99pp0916

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparatio...

In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the second time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waves after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his boot. Afte... more

Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the "Astrovan" a second time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After the July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0922

Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head fo...

Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the "Astrovan" a second time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After the July 20 launch attempt was s... more

US Air Force Airmen train in a maintenance shop to learn the RC-135 engine's secrets. Young troops are getting valuable in-house training, improving their effectiveness on the flight line. Engine reliability has soared since the course has put out better trained techs. This image was used in the May 2000 AIRMAN Magazine article "Working Wonders with Engines."

US Air Force Airmen train in a maintenance shop to learn the RC-135 en...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Offutt Air Force Base State: Nebraska (NE) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Dave Nolan, USAF Release Status: ... more

Secrets of the Noachian Highlands: Pit Craters

Secrets of the Noachian Highlands: Pit Craters

Secrets of the Noachian Highlands: Pit Craters NASA/JPL/MSSS

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tucked inside a Pegasus XL rocket, attached to the under belly of this Orbital Stargazer L-1011 aircraft, the HESSI spacecraft is being  carried approximately 113 nautical miles east-southeast of Cape Canaveral to an altitude of about 39,000 feet for release. During its planned two-year mission HESSI will study the secrets of how solar flares are produced in the Sun's atmosphere.  Launch of HESSI in mid-air over the Atlantic Ocean is scheduled for 3:26 p.m. EST KSC-02pd0099

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tucked inside a Pegasus XL rocket, attac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tucked inside a Pegasus XL rocket, attached to the under belly of this Orbital Stargazer L-1011 aircraft, the HESSI spacecraft is being carried approximately 113 nautical miles ea... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  Emerging through the smoke and steam, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.  A NASA Discovery mission, Deep Impact is heading for space and a rendezvous 83 million miles from Earth with Comet Tempel 1.  After releasing a 3- by 3-foot projectile (impactor) to crash onto the surface July 4, 2005, Deep Impact’s flyby spacecraft will reveal the secrets of the comet’s interior by collecting pictures and data of how the crater forms, measuring the crater’s depth and diameter as well as the composition of the interior of the crater and any material thrown out, and determining the changes in natural outgassing produced by the impact.  It will send the data back to Earth through the antennas of the Deep Space Network. KSC-05pp0138

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Emerging through the smoke and steam, t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Emerging through the smoke and steam, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft lifts off at 1:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force S... more

Ring Scan Spilling Secrets

Ring Scan Spilling Secrets

New insights into the nature of Saturn’s rings are revealed in this panoramic mosaic of 15 images taken during the planet’s August 2009 equinox, taken by NASA Cassini Orbiter. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Secrets of Schröteri

Secrets of Schröteri

Secrets of Schröteri NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

A Saucerful of Secrets

A Saucerful of Secrets

A Saucerful of Secrets NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Unmasking the Secrets of Mercury

Unmasking the Secrets of Mercury

The MASCS instrument onboard NASA MESSENGER spacecraft was designed to study both the exosphere and surface of Mercury. To learn more about the minerals and surface processes on Mercury, the Visual and Infrared... more

Uncovering the secrets of the Quintuplet Cluster

Uncovering the secrets of the Quintuplet Cluster

Although this cluster of stars gained its name due to its five brightest stars, it is home to hundreds more. The huge number of massive young stars in the cluster is clearly captured in this NASA/ESA Hubble Spa... more

Secrets of Hidden Valley on Mars

Secrets of Hidden Valley on Mars

An image taken at the Hidden Valley site, en-route to Mount Sharp, by NASA Curiosity rover. A variety of mudstone strata in the area indicate a lakebed deposit, with river- and stream-related deposits nearby. D... more

Secrets Revealed from Pluto Twilight Zone

Secrets Revealed from Pluto Twilight Zone

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft took this stunning image of Pluto only a few minutes after closest approach on July 14, 2015. The image was obtained at a high phase angle -- that is, with the sun on the other si... more

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

In a panel discussion in the Kennedy Space Center’s Operations Support Building II, social media followers were briefed by NASA scientists on asteroids, how they relate to the origins of our solar system and th... more

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

In a panel discussion in the Kennedy Space Center’s Operations Support Building II, social media followers were briefed by NASA scientists on asteroids, how they relate to the origins of our solar system and th... more

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

OSIRIS-REx "Uncovering the Secrets of Asteroids" Briefing

In a panel discussion in the Kennedy Space Center’s Operations Support Building II, social media followers were briefed by NASA scientists on asteroids, how they relate to the origins of our solar system and th... more

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible t...

Created by "Carey and Sons Lith, N.Y." Transferred from; LC Rare Book and Special Collections Division; 1956. Despite directions to the contrary, Hardeen passed on to others the legacy he had received. Today, ... more

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible t...

Created by "Carey and Sons Lith, N.Y." Transferred from; LC Rare Book and Special Collections Division; 1956. Despite directions to the contrary, Hardeen passed on to others the legacy he had received. Today, ... more

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible the continuance of Houdini's master mysteries.

Hardeen inherits his brother's secrets Houdini's will makes possible t...

Created by "Carey and Sons Lith, N.Y." Transferred from; LC Rare Book and Special Collections Division; 1956. Despite directions to the contrary, Hardeen passed on to others the legacy he had received. Today, ... more