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Topic: satellites

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United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-744 (Suppl. 5 1958)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1958 Edition, Supplement 5, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-744

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-744 (Suppl. 4 1958)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1958 Edition, Supplement 4, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-744

Juno II  - Early Rockets

Juno II - Early Rockets

Juno II was a part of America's effort to increase its capability to lift heavier satellites into orbit. One payload was Explorer VII. This photograph depicts workers installing the Explorer VII satellite on Ju... more

Television Infrared Observation Satellite TIROS

Television Infrared Observation Satellite TIROS

Scientist giving a vibration test to TIROS, Television Infrared Observation Satellite, at the Astro-Electronic Products Division of RCA in Princeton, New Jersey. TIROS was NASA's first experimental step to dete... more

Syncom, the First Geosynchronous Satellite

Syncom, the First Geosynchronous Satellite

By 1960, Hughes, RCA and ATT were urging NASA to develop a different type of communications satellite. Hughes believed that geosynchronous satellites, which orbit Earth 22,300 miles (35,900 km) above the ground... more

Meteor Impact Model in the new Space Power Chambers

Meteor Impact Model in the new Space Power Chambers

S-65 Meteor Impact Model set up in the former Altitude Wind Tunnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center just days after the September 12, 1962 rededication of the fa... more

Code of Federal Regulations: Satellite Communications, 47 C.F.R. (1963)

Code of Federal Regulations: Satellite Communications, 47 C.F.R. (1963...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47: Telecommunication, Chapter I: Federal Communications Commission, Part 25: Satellite Communications, Revised 1963

Code of Federal Regulations: Satellite Communications, 47 C.F.R. (1964)

Code of Federal Regulations: Satellite Communications, 47 C.F.R. (1964...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47: Telecommunication, Chapter I: Federal Communications Commission, Part 25: Satellite Communications, Revised 1964

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-744 (1964)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1964 Edition, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-744

Olympic Game Communication Satellite Birds

Olympic Game Communication Satellite Birds

(October 16, 1968) The replicas of the covey (flock) of synchronous communication satellites that were used to televise the 19th Olympic Games from Mexico City to audiences in Europe and Japan. The satellites a... more

AS12-54-8076 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image  - Target of Opportunity (TO) - 32 - Crater Lalande interior, ejecta and close satellites

AS12-54-8076 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image - Target of Opport...

The original database describes this as: Description: Near vertical stereo strip view of Target of Opportunity (TO) - 32 - Crater Lalande interior,ejecta and close satellites. The image was taken during the Ap... more

AS12-54-8075 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image  - Target of Opportunity (TO) - 32 - Crater Lalande interior, ejecta and close satellites

AS12-54-8075 - Apollo 12 - Apollo 12 Mission image - Target of Opport...

The original database describes this as: Description: Near vertical stereo strip view of Target of Opportunity (TO) - 32 - Crater Lalande interior, ejecta and close satellites. The image was taken during the A... more

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (Suppl. 1 1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Supplement 1, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Section 702

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (Suppl. 2 1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Supplement 2, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Section 702

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (Suppl. 4 1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Supplement 4, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Section 702

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-744 (1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-744

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (Suppl. 5 1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Supplement 5, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Section 702

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (Suppl. 3 1970)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. § 702 (...

Description: U.S. Code 1970 Edition, Supplement 3, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Section 702

View of Scientific Instrument Module to be flown on Apollo 15

View of Scientific Instrument Module to be flown on Apollo 15

S71-2250X (June 1971) --- A close-up view of the Scientific Instrument Module (SIM) to be flown for the first time on the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. Mounted in a previously vacant sector of the Apollo Ser... more

Space Flower Antenna Application Technology Satellite (ATS)

Space Flower Antenna Application Technology Satellite (ATS)

(October 13, 1972) "Space Flower" was the first of the 9-meter (30-foot) diameter antennas for the Application Technology Satellites (ATS). The ATS program was initiated in 1966 to demonstrate the feasibility a... more

Ellen Weaver, Biologist

Ellen Weaver, Biologist

Ellen Weaver, an associate professor of biology from California State University is shown developing instrumentation to be used in satellites for ocean monitoring. In the early 1970s, NASA researchers and ocean... more

A Titan III-C stands poised on Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for the launch of Application Technology Satellite-F, first in a new generation of NASA communications satellites. (1.3-2) 74P-126

A Titan III-C stands poised on Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force ...

A Titan III-C stands poised on Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for the launch of Application Technology Satellite-F, first in a new generation of NASA communications satellites. (1.3-2)

An Air Force Titan III-C lifted off from Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 9:00 A.M. EDT today to launch Application Technology Satellite 6, first in a new generation of NASA Communications satellites. (1.3-13)(Test 7670) 74PC-374

An Air Force Titan III-C lifted off from Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral ...

An Air Force Titan III-C lifted off from Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 9:00 A.M. EDT today to launch Application Technology Satellite 6, first in a new generation of NASA Communications sate... more

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, 1975-present

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, 1975-present

Image Credit: NASA..Description GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites)-1 was launched on October 16, 1975. The geostationary operational environmental satellites provided environmental data t... more

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-744 (1976)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1976 Edition, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-744

PLANET JUPITER AND ITS SATELLITES PHOTOGRAPHED BY THE VOYAGER SPACECRAFT

PLANET JUPITER AND ITS SATELLITES PHOTOGRAPHED BY THE VOYAGER SPACECRA...

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 6/5/1979 Photographer: COPY NEGATIVE Keywords: 1979_02325.jpg c1979_02300s Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

BOWLING TEAMS - BUCKEYE LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHT - BUCKEYE LANES WOMENS TUESDAY NIGHT SATELLITES - BEREA LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHTS

BOWLING TEAMS - BUCKEYE LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHT - BUCKEYE LANES WOM...

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 5/25/1979 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

Army soldiers receive position information from NAVSTAR satellites with the aid of backpacks

Army soldiers receive position information from NAVSTAR satellites wit...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

DRAWING OF SPACE SHUTTLE AND SATELLITES

DRAWING OF SPACE SHUTTLE AND SATELLITES

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 10/5/1979 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Photographer Assistants: COPY NEGATIVE Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facil... more

BOWLING TEAMS - BUCKEYE LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHT - BUCKEYE LANES WOMENS TUESDAY NIGHT SATELLITES - BEREA LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHTS

BOWLING TEAMS - BUCKEYE LANES MENS WEDNESDAY NIGHT - BUCKEYE LANES WOM...

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 5/25/1979 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

Photo by Voyager 1 (JPL) Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and three of its four largest satellites are visible in this photo taken Feb 5, 1979 by Voyager 1. The spacecraft was 28.4 million kilomters (17.5 million miles) from the planet at the time. The inner-most large satellite, Io, can be seen against Jupiter's disk. Io is distinguished by its bright, brown-yellow surface. To the right of Jupiter is the satellite Europa, also very bright but with fainter surface markings. The darkest satellite, Callisto (still nearly twice as bright as Earth's Moon), is barely visible at the bottom left of the picture. Callisto shows a bright patch in its northern hemisphere. All tThree orbit Jupiter in the equatorial plane, and appear in their present position because Voyageris above the plane. All three satellites show the same face to Jupiter always -- just as Earth's Moon always shows us the same face. In this photo we see the sides of the satellites that always face away from the planet. Jupiter's colorfully banded atmosphere displays complex patterns highlighted by the Great Red Spot, a large, circulating atmospheric disturbance. This photo was assembled from three black and white negatives by the Image Processing Lab at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. JPL manages and controls the Voyage Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (ref: P-21083) ARC-1969-AC79-0164-2

Photo by Voyager 1 (JPL) Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and three of its ...

Photo by Voyager 1 (JPL) Jupiter, its Great Red Spot and three of its four largest satellites are visible in this photo taken Feb 5, 1979 by Voyager 1. The spacecraft was 28.4 million kilomters (17.5 million mi... more

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions.  Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur.  Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.  At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands.  (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-A79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Eu...

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... more

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions.  Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur.  Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.  At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands.  (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-AC79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Eu...

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... more

Range :  5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning shot of Ganymede, largest of Jupiter's 13 satellites.  It's slightly larger than Mercury with a density  about twice that of water.  It's believed to be made of rock and ice with a surface of water and ice.  Ganymede is 4 times brighter than our Moon with the bright spot in center of photo 5 times brighter than the Moon, and may contain more ice than surrounding areas.  The bright pattern around the spot seems like ray craters on the Moon and Mercury and the area may in fact be an impact crater that has exposed fresh, underlying ice.  Photo taken through blue, green and orange filters. ARC-1979-A79-7026

Range : 5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning ...

Range : 5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning shot of Ganymede, largest of Jupiter's 13 satellites. It's slightly larger than Mercury with a density about twice that of water. It's be... more

Range :  5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning shot of Ganymede, largest of Jupiter's 13 satellites.  It's slightly larger than Mercury with a density  about twice that of water.  It's believed to be made of rock and ice with a surface of water and ice.  Ganymede is 4 times brighter than our Moon with the bright spot in center of photo 5 times brighter than the Moon, and may contain more ice than surrounding areas.  The bright pattern around the spot seems like ray craters on the Moon and Mercury and the area may in fact be an impact crater that has exposed fresh, underlying ice.  Photo taken through blue, green and orange filters. ARC-1979-AC79-7026

Range : 5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning ...

Range : 5 million miles (8.025 million kilometers) This is a morning shot of Ganymede, largest of Jupiter's 13 satellites. It's slightly larger than Mercury with a density about twice that of water. It's be... more

Range : 7 million kilometers (4.3 million miles) Io is Jupiter's innermost of the four Galilean satellites.  Photo taken at 2:00 AM through an ultraviolet filter. The photo's background is part of Jupiter's disk.  North is at the top and the central longitude of Io is 180 degrees.  Io shows a contrasting surface with dark polar areas and many light and dark regions around the equator.  This resolution of about 100 miles/160 kilometers, no topographic features, like craters, can be seen.  The brighter regions may be areas containing sulfur and various salts, making Io very reflective(six times brighter thanb Earth's Moon).  Io is about the same size and density as our Moon, but has followed a different evolutionary path, influenced by its closeness to Jupiter and the intense bombardment it receives from the Jovian radiation belts of energetic charged particles. ARC-1979-A79-7022

Range : 7 million kilometers (4.3 million miles) Io is Jupiter's inner...

Range : 7 million kilometers (4.3 million miles) Io is Jupiter's innermost of the four Galilean satellites. Photo taken at 2:00 AM through an ultraviolet filter. The photo's background is part of Jupiter's dis... more

This photo of Callisto, outermost of Jupiter's four Galilean satellites, was taken a few minutes after midnight (PST) Feb. 25 by Voyager 1.  The distance to Callisto was 8,023,000 kilometers (4.98 million miles).  The hemisphere in this picture shows a fairly uniform surface dotted with brighter spots that are up to several hundred kilometers across.  Scientists believe the spots may be impact craters but higher-resolution photos will be necessary before the features can be interpreted.  Callisto is about the same size as the planet Mercury--about 5,000 kilometers (3,000 miles) in diameter.  Callisto is less massive than Mercury, however, giving it a density less than twice that of water.  Scientists believe Callisto, therefore, is composed of a mixture of rock and ice (up to about 50 percent by weight).  Its surface is darker than those of the other Galilean satellites, but is still about twice as bright as Earth's Moon.  This black-and-white photo was taken through a violet filter.  Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-21149) ARC-1979-A79-7027

This photo of Callisto, outermost of Jupiter's four Galilean satellite...

This photo of Callisto, outermost of Jupiter's four Galilean satellites, was taken a few minutes after midnight (PST) Feb. 25 by Voyager 1. The distance to Callisto was 8,023,000 kilometers (4.98 million miles... more

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's outermost Galilean satellites and darkest of  the four(but almost twice as bright as Earth's Moon).  Mottled appearance from bright and dark patches.  Bright spots seem like rayed or bright halved craters seen on our Moon.  This face is always turned toward Jupiter.  Photo taken through violet filter.  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7020

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's o...

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's outermost Galilean satellites and darkest of the four(but almost twice as bright as Earth's Moon). Mottled appearance from bright and dark ... more

Range :  4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet.  Photo taken after midnight  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7016

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupite...

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less... more

Europa , the smallest of the Galilean satellites, or Moons , of Jupiter ,  is seen here as taken by Voyager 1.  Range : 2 million km (1.2 million miles) is centered at about the 300 degree Meridian.  The bright areas are probably ice deposits, while the dark may be rocky surface or areas of more patchy ice distribution.  Most unusual features are systems of linear structures crossing the surface in various directions. Of these, some of which are over 1000 km. long , & 2 or 3 hundred km. wide,  may be faults which have disrupted the surface. ARC-1979-AC79-7003

Europa , the smallest of the Galilean satellites, or Moons , of Jupite...

Europa , the smallest of the Galilean satellites, or Moons , of Jupiter , is seen here as taken by Voyager 1. Range : 2 million km (1.2 million miles) is centered at about the 300 degree Meridian. The bright... more

An Atlas Centaur launch vehicle lifts off from Complex 36 at 2:56 p.m. carrying the second in a series of fleet communications satellites

An Atlas Centaur launch vehicle lifts off from Complex 36 at 2:56 p.m....

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Rele... more

P-21739 BW Range: 4.7 million kilometers (2.9 million miles) This picture of Io was taken as Voyager 2 closes in on the Jovian system. Scientists are studying these distant views of Io for evidences of changes since Voyager 1 observations in March of  79. Voyager 1 discovered that Io, the innermost of the Galilean satellites, is the most volcanically active body yet seen in the solar system, surpassing even earth. In this picture, the first volcano discovered by Voyager 1 is again visible in the lower left portion of the disk as a dark oval with a dark spot in the center.  In March, this volcano appeared as a heart-shaped marking, not a symmetrical oval. Scientists believe that the non-symmetric markings earlier resulted from a constriction in the mouth of the volcanic vent causing erupting material to extrude preferentially in certain directions. Apparently, the volcanic eruptive activity, which sends material to altitudes of 280 kilometers (175 miles) or more above this volcano, has changed the vent geometry or dislodged an obstruction. Such changes in the form of eruptive fountains are common in terrestial volcanos, although on a much smaller scale than on Io. ARC-1979-A79-7074

P-21739 BW Range: 4.7 million kilometers (2.9 million miles) This pict...

P-21739 BW Range: 4.7 million kilometers (2.9 million miles) This picture of Io was taken as Voyager 2 closes in on the Jovian system. Scientists are studying these distant views of Io for evidences of changes ... more

P-21745 BW Range: 1.1 million miles (675,000 miles) This image of Callisto taken by Voyager 2 was enhanced to reveal detail in the scene.  Voyager 1's high resolution coverage was of the hemisphere just over the right-hand (eastern) horizon, and the large ring structure discovered by Voyager 1 is just over the eastern limb. This image shows yet another ring structure in the upper part of the picture. Callisto exhibits some of the most ancient terrain seen on any of the satellites. Scientists think Callisto's surface is a mixture of ice and rock dating back to the final stages of planetary accretion (over 4 billion years ago) when the surface was pockmarked by a torrential bombardment of meteorites. Younger craters show as bright spots, probably because they expose fresh ice and frost. ARC-1979-A79-7079

P-21745 BW Range: 1.1 million miles (675,000 miles) This image of Call...

P-21745 BW Range: 1.1 million miles (675,000 miles) This image of Callisto taken by Voyager 2 was enhanced to reveal detail in the scene. Voyager 1's high resolution coverage was of the hemisphere just over th... more

Range :  1,094,666 km (677,000 mi.) This false color picture of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 and is centered on 11 degrees N and 171 degrees W.  This rendition uses an ultraviolet image for the blue component.  Because the surface displays regional contrast in UV, variations in surface materials are apparent.  Notice in particular the dark blue haloes which surround bright craters in the eastern hemisphere.  The surface of Callisto is the most heavily cratered of the Galilean satellites and resembles ancient heavily cratered terrains on the moon, Mercury and Mars.  The bright areas are ejecta thrown out by relatively young impact craters.  A large ringed structure, probably an impact basin, is shown in the upper left part of the picture.  The color version of this picture was constructed by compositing black and white images taken through the ultraviolet, clear and orange filters. ARC-1979-AC79-7104

Range : 1,094,666 km (677,000 mi.) This false color picture of Callis...

Range : 1,094,666 km (677,000 mi.) This false color picture of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 and is centered on 11 degrees N and 171 degrees W. This rendition uses an ultraviolet image for the blue componen... more

Range :  241,000km (150,600 mi.). This black and white image of Europa, smallest of Jupiter's four Galilean satellites, was acquired by Voyager 2.  Europa, the brightest of the Galiliean satellites, has a density slightly less than Io, suggesting it has a substantial quantity of water.  Scientists previously speculated that the water must have cooled from the interior and formed a mantle of ice perhaps 100 km thick.  The complex patterns on its surface suggest that the icy surface was fractured, and that the cracks filled with dark material from below.  Very few impact craters are visible on the surface, suggesting that active processes on the surface are still modifying Europa.  The tectonic pattern seen on its surface differs drastically from the fault systems seen on Ganymede where pieces of the crust have moved relative to each other.  On Europa, the crust evidently fractures but the pieces remain in roughly their original position. ARC-1979-A79-7092

Range : 241,000km (150,600 mi.). This black and white image of Europa...

Range : 241,000km (150,600 mi.). This black and white image of Europa, smallest of Jupiter's four Galilean satellites, was acquired by Voyager 2. Europa, the brightest of the Galiliean satellites, has a densi... more

Range :  225,000 kilometers (140,625 miles) This image of the Jovian moon Europa was taken by Voyager 2 along the evening terminator, which best shows the surface topography of complex narrow ridges, seen as curved bright streaks, 5 to 10 kilometers wide, and typically 100 kilometers in length.  The area shown is about 600 by 800 kilometers, and the smallest features visible are about 4 kilometers in size.  Also visable are dark bands, more diffused in character, 20 to 40 kilometers wide and hundreds to thousands of kilometers in length.  A few features are suggestive of impact craters but are rare, indication that the surface thought to be dominantly ice is still active, perhaps warmed by tidal heating like Io.  The larger icy satellites, Callisto and Ganymede, are evidently colder with much more rigid crusts and ancient impact craters.  The complex intersection of dark markings and bright ridges suggest that the surface has been fractured and material from beneath has welled up to fill the cracks. ARC-1979-A79-7093

Range : 225,000 kilometers (140,625 miles) This image of the Jovian m...

Range : 225,000 kilometers (140,625 miles) This image of the Jovian moon Europa was taken by Voyager 2 along the evening terminator, which best shows the surface topography of complex narrow ridges, seen as cu... more

Range :  1.2 million kilometers (750,000 miles) This picture of Io is one of the last sequence of 'volcano watch' pictures planned as a time lapse study of the nearest of Jupiter's Galilean satellites.  The sunlit crescent of Io is seen at the left, and the night side illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter can also be seen.  Three volcanic eruption plumes are visible on the limb.  All three were previously seen by Voyager 1.  On the bright limb Plume 5 (upper) and Plume 6 (lower) are about 100 km high, while Plume 2 on the dark limb is about 185 km high and 325 km wide.  The dimensions of Plume 2 are about 1 1/2 times greater than during the Boyager 1 encounter, indicating that the intensity of the eruptions has increased during the four-month time interval between the Boyager encounters.  The three volcanic eruptions and at least three others have apparently been active at roughly the same intesity or greater for a period of at least four months. ARC-1979-A79-7099

Range : 1.2 million kilometers (750,000 miles) This picture of Io is ...

Range : 1.2 million kilometers (750,000 miles) This picture of Io is one of the last sequence of 'volcano watch' pictures planned as a time lapse study of the nearest of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. The sun... more

Range :  106,250,000 km. ( 66 million miles) P-22830C This, Voyager 1 image shows Saturn and three of its satellites. A series of dark and light cloud bands appears through high altitude haze in the northern hemisphere. Cosiderable structure can be seen in the rings. The Cassini division, between the A-ring and B-ring, is readily visible. The shadow of rings on the planet's disk can also be seeen. The three satellites visible are, left to right, Enceladus (off the left edge of rings), Dione (just below the planet), and Tethys (at right edge of frame). The spacecraft will make its closest approach, 124,200 km. (77,174 miles) abovr the cloud tops, at  3:45 pm PST on Nov. 12, 1980. Nine months later, in August 1981, Voyager 2 will encounter Saturn and then continue on to Uranus. ARC-1980-AC80-7000

Range : 106,250,000 km. ( 66 million miles) P-22830C This, Voyager 1 ...

Range : 106,250,000 km. ( 66 million miles) P-22830C This, Voyager 1 image shows Saturn and three of its satellites. A series of dark and light cloud bands appears through high altitude haze in the northern he... more

Range :  76 million km. ( 47 million miles) P-22892C This, Voyager 1 image shows Saturn and five of its satellites. Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is clearly seen in the upper right corner. The smaller satellites, Dione & Tethys, are shown in the upper left corner, top and bottom respectively. Two of the innermost satellites, Mimas & Enceladus, appear to the lower right of the planet, with Mimas closest to Satun. The bright object to the left of the rings is not a moon, but an artifact of processing. Voyager 1 will make its closest approach November 12th, 1980, ata distance of 124,200 km. (77,176 mi.). this photo is just one of 17,000 images taken of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites by Voyager 1. ARC-1980-AC80-7001

Range : 76 million km. ( 47 million miles) P-22892C This, Voyager 1 i...

Range : 76 million km. ( 47 million miles) P-22892C This, Voyager 1 image shows Saturn and five of its satellites. Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is clearly seen in the upper right corner. The smaller satellite... more

Range :  12 million km. ( 7.56 million miles) P-23057C & BW This Voyager 1 photograph of Titan, the largest of Saturn's 14 known satellites, shows little more than the upper layers of clouds covering the moon. The orange colored haze, is believed to be composed of photochemically produced hydrocarbons, hides Titan's solid surface from Voyager's camera. Some weak shadings in the clouds are becoming visible. However, note that the satellite's southern, lower, hemisphere is brighter than the northern. It is not known whether these subtle shadings are on the surface or are due to clouds below a high haze layer. ARC-1980-AC80-7007

Range : 12 million km. ( 7.56 million miles) P-23057C & BW This Voyag...

Range : 12 million km. ( 7.56 million miles) P-23057C & BW This Voyager 1 photograph of Titan, the largest of Saturn's 14 known satellites, shows little more than the upper layers of clouds covering the moon. ... more

Range :  34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 photograph of Saturn was taken on the last day it could be captured within a single narrow angle camera frame as the spacecraft neared the planet for it's closest approach on Nov. 12, 1980. Dione, one of Saturn's innermost satellites, appears as three color spots just below  the planet's south pole. An abundance of previously unseen detail is apparent in the rings. For example, a gap in the dark, innermst ring, C-ring or Crepe Ring, is clearly shown. Also, material is seen inside the relatively wide Cassini Division, seperating  the middle, B-ring from the outermost ring, the A-ring. The Encke division is shown near the outer edge of A-ring. The detail in the ring's shadows cast on the planet is of particular interest. The broad dark band near the equator is the shadow of B-ring. The thinner, brighter line just to the south is the shadow  of the less dense A-ring. ARC-1980-AC80-7003

Range : 34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 ...

Range : 34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 photograph of Saturn was taken on the last day it could be captured within a single narrow angle camera frame as the spacecraft neared the p... more

Range :  7.7 million km. ( 4.8 million miles ) P-29465 In this image captured by Voyager 2, three newly discovered satellites of Uranus can be seen orbiting outside of the nine known rings of Uranus. The outermost of the rings, the Epsilon Ring can be seen here at upper right. The largest of the three moons viewed here, 1986U1, was discovered January 3rd. it is an estimated 90 km. ( 55 mi. )  across and its orbits Uranus every 12 hours, 19 minutes ata distance of 66,090 km. ( 41,040 mi.) from the planets center. the other two moons are slightly smaller, 1986U3 orbits every 11 hours, 6 minutes at 61,750 km. ( 38,350 mi.),1986U4 every 13 hours, 24 minutes at 69,920 km.  ( 43,420 mi.). They were dicovered on January 9th and 13th, respectively. Long exposures were required to bring out these small objects. As a result of the relative motions of the spacecraft and the moons, they appear slightly elongated. ARC-1981-A86-7005

Range : 7.7 million km. ( 4.8 million miles ) P-29465 In this image c...

Range : 7.7 million km. ( 4.8 million miles ) P-29465 In this image captured by Voyager 2, three newly discovered satellites of Uranus can be seen orbiting outside of the nine known rings of Uranus. The outerm... more

Range :  4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 has discovered  two 'shepard' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons, designated 1986U7 and 1986U8, are seen here on either side of the bright Epsilon Ring. All nine of the known Uranian rings are visible here. The image was proccessed to enhance narrow features. The Epsilon Ring appears surrounded by a dark halo as a result of this proccessing. Occasional blips seen on the ring are also artifacts. Lying inward from the Epsilon Ring are the Delta, Gamma, and Eta Rings; then the Beta abd Alpha Rings; and finally, the barely visible 4, 5, and 6 Rings. The rings have been studied since their discovery in 1977, through observations of how they diminish the light of stars they pass in front of. This image is the first direct observationn of all nine rings in reflected sunlight. They range in width from about 100 km. (60 mi.) at the widest part of the Epsilon Ring to only a few kilometers  for most of the others. The discovery of the two ring moons 1986U7 and 1986U8 is a major advance in our understanding of the structure of the Uranian rings and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions of how these narrow rings are kept from spreading out. Based on likely surface brightness properties, the moons are of roughly 20 and 30 km. diameter, respectively. ARC-1981-A86-7006

Range : 4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 ha...

Range : 4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 has discovered two 'shepard' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons, designated 1986U7 and 1986U8, are seen here on ei... more

51A-46-054 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-054 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-077 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-077 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing a satellite Westar VI berthed in the payload bay. Subject Terms: ASTRONAUTS, CREWS, SATELLITES, COMMUNICATION SATELL... more

51A-46-059 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-059 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-052 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-052 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

S07-19-937 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

S07-19-937 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of the payload bay taken from the aft flight deck window. It show the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01), the experiment pallet for the NASA Office... more

51A-46-062 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-062 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-073 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-073 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing in the payload bay with Astronauts Dale A. Gardner (no stripe), left, and Joseph P. Allen IV (red stripe) working tog... more

51A-46-076 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-076 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing a satellite Westar VI berthed in the payload bay. Subject Terms: ASTRONAUTS, CREWS, SATELLITES, COMMUNICATION SATELL... more

51A-46-065 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-065 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-053 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-053 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-058 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-058 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-072 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-072 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing in the payload bay with Astronauts Dale A. Gardner (no stripe), left, and Joseph P. Allen IV (red stripe) working tog... more

51A-46-063 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-063 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-061 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-061 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

S07-19-935 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

S07-19-935 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of the payload bay taken from the aft flight deck window. It show the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01), the experiment pallet for the NASA Office... more

S07-32-1745 - STS-007 - View of the shuttle Challenger from the SPAS-01 satellite

S07-32-1745 - STS-007 - View of the shuttle Challenger from the SPAS-0...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the STS-7 shuttle Challenger taken from the Shuttle pallet satellite (SPAS-01) include: Dark, close-up view of closed protective ``cradle`` for... more

51A-46-060 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-060 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-057 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-057 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

S07-19-936 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

S07-19-936 - STS-007 - View of payload bay during STS-7

The original finding aid described this as: Description: View of the payload bay taken from the aft flight deck window. It show the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01), the experiment pallet for the NASA Office... more

51A-46-066 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-066 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV in an ... more

51A-46-055 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-055 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-056 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-056 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-064 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

51A-46-064 - STS-51A - 51A Astronauts and satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing astronauts in Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) and satellites. Views include: astronaut Dale A. Gardner, in an E... more

51A-46-074 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-074 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing in the payload bay with Astronauts Dale A. Gardner (no stripe), left, and Joseph P. Allen IV (red stripe) working tog... more

51A-46-075 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

51A-46-075 - STS-51A - 51A EVA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing Astronauts Dale A. Gardner (in his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), looking into the orbiter aft flight deck windo... more

Artist concept of satellite in orbit above the earth

Artist concept of satellite in orbit above the earth

Artist concept of satellite with solar panels deployed in orbit above the earth.

An artist's concept of satellites in orbit, with the earth in the background

An artist's concept of satellites in orbit, with the earth in the back...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Afsc Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

An artist's concept of various communications satellites in orbit

An artist's concept of various communications satellites in orbit

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Afsc Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-757 (1982)

United States Code: Communications Satellite System, 47 U.S.C. §§ 701-...

Description: U.S. Code 1982 Edition, Title 47: Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs, Chapter 6: Communications Satellite System, Sections 701-757

The Delta 160 launch vehicle, carrying Westar IV, the fourth in a series of Western Union communications satellites, lifts off from Complex 17 at 7:04 p.m

The Delta 160 launch vehicle, carrying Westar IV, the fourth in a seri...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Rele... more

A view of the launch of the India Delta 161 and the first of two INSAT-1 multipurpose satellites from Complex 17A

A view of the launch of the India Delta 161 and the first of two INSAT...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Com... more

A Delta 162 launch vehicle, carrying Westar V, the fifth in a series of Western Union communications satellites, lifts off from Pad 17 at 8:24 p.m. EDT

A Delta 162 launch vehicle, carrying Westar V, the fifth in a series o...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral Air Force Station State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Rele... more

A view of the launch of the Delta 162 carrying WESTAR V, the fifth in a series of Western Union communications satellites

A view of the launch of the Delta 162 carrying WESTAR V, the fifth in ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Com... more

A Titan 34D/IUS (inertial upper stage) vehicle carrying two military communications satellites, a DSCS-II and a DSCS-III, is launched at 12:05 a.m

A Titan 34D/IUS (inertial upper stage) vehicle carrying two military c...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Cape Canaveral State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Com... more

Two military communications satellites, a DSCS-II and a DSCS-III, are launched aboard a Titan 34D/IUS launch vehicle at Space Launch Complex 40

Two military communications satellites, a DSCS-II and a DSCS-III, are ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Kennedy Space Center State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Publ... more

Palapa-B communications satellite launched from the Shuttle Challenger

Palapa-B communications satellite launched from the Shuttle Challenger

S83-35764 (19 June 1983) --- The Indonesian Palapa B communications satellite is just about to clear the vertical stabilizer of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Challenger to begin its way toward its Earth-orbi... more

OMS engine firing

OMS engine firing

S83-35782 (18 June 1983) --- An Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine firing caused this bright glow at the aft end of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983. Also visible in the 70mm e... more

51A-39-070 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-070 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: payload bay with extended Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm ... more

51A-39-077 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-077 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: satellite in the payload bay. Subject Terms: SATELLITES COMMU... more

51A-39-041 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-041 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: views of astronauts MS Dale A. Gardner and MS Jospeh P. Allen... more

51A-39-076 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-076 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: satellite in the payload bay. Subject Terms: SATELLITES COMMU... more

51A-39-059 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-059 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: astronaut MS Joseph P. Allen IV rides the Remote Manipulator Sy... more

51A-39-067 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-067 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: close-up of the visor and the helmet of an astronaut in an EMU.... more

51A-39-037 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-037 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: ``Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: views of astronauts MS Dale A. Gardner and MS Jospeh P. Allen... more

51A-40-110 - STS-51A - 51A Payload bay

51A-40-110 - STS-51A - 51A Payload bay

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing payload bay. Subject Terms: SATELLITES, COMMUNICATION SATELLITES, EXTRAVEHICULAR MOBILITY UNITS, ASTRONAUTS, CREWS, ... more

51A-39-074 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-074 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: payload bay with extended Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm ... more

51A-39-018 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

51A-39-018 - STS-51A - 51A crewmember recovering satellites

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Photographic documentation showing recovery of communications satellites. Views include: various views of a the end effector on the end of the Remote Ma... more