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Topic: russian space agency

1997
1997
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2013
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410 media by topicpage 1 of 5
STS-84 Mission Specialists Elena V. Kondakova, at left, and Jean-Francois Clervoy pose for photos outside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logistics to the Russian Space Station Mir. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, has the nickname of Betty Sue for this mission. Clervoy, an astronaut with the European Space Agency, is wearing a name tag with his mission nickname, Billie Bob. They are participating in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with Mir. It also will be the third consecutive crew member exchange of U.S. astronauts aboard Mir. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will replace astronaut Jerry M. Linenger on Mir. Linenger has been on Mir since the STS-81 mission in January. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc498

STS-84 Mission Specialists Elena V. Kondakova, at left, and Jean-Franc...

STS-84 Mission Specialists Elena V. Kondakova, at left, and Jean-Francois Clervoy pose for photos outside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logist... more

STS-84 mission specialists and SPACEHAB workers participate in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logistics to the Russian Space Station Mir. Standing at left is JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Sitting on the floor, from left, are Edward Tsang Lu of NASA and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The test is being conducted at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with Mir. It also will be the third consecutive crew member exchange of U.S. astronauts aboard Mir. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will replace astronaut Jerry M. Linenger on Mir. Linenger has been on Mir since the STS-81 mission in January. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc500

STS-84 mission specialists and SPACEHAB workers participate in the Cre...

STS-84 mission specialists and SPACEHAB workers participate in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and... more

STS-84 crew members pose outside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logistics to the Russian Space Station Mir. From left, are Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu of NASA. They are participating in the Crew Equipment Integration Test (CEIT) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility in Cape Canaveral. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with Mir. It also will be the third consecutive crew member exchange of U.S. astronauts aboard Mir. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will replace astronaut Jerry M. Linenger on Mir. Linenger has been on Mir since the STS-81 mission in January. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc499

STS-84 crew members pose outside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which wil...

STS-84 crew members pose outside the SPACEHAB Double Module, which will carry more than 6,000 pounds of scientific experiments and logistics to the Russian Space Station Mir. From left, are Mission Specialists ... more

STS-84 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for liftoff on the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Mission Specialists Edward Tsang Lu and Carlos I. Noriega. They are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. After the docking, Foale will transfer to the Russian Space Station Mir, becoming a member of the Mir 23 crew. He will replace Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Liftoff of STS-84 is targeted for May 15 KSC-97pc733

STS-84 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A, whe...

STS-84 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for liftoff on the sixth Shuttle-Mir docking mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francoi... more

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt, in right foreground, talks to fellow crew members, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, in left foreground, of the Russian Space Agency, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. In the background are NASA suit technician Al Rochford, at left, and astronaut Mario Runco Jr., who is assisting the STS-84 crew. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist Michael C. Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc739

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt, in right foreground, talks to fe...

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt, in right foreground, talks to fellow crew members, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, in left foreground, of the Russian Space Agency, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins du... more

The STS-84 crew gets a ride in an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. At right, from front to back, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins and Commander Charles J. Precourt. On left, from front to back, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu. George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, is seated next to Lu. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc742

The STS-84 crew gets a ride in an M-113 armored personnel carrier whil...

The STS-84 crew gets a ride in an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. At right, from front to back, are Mission Spec... more

With several of her fellow crew members watching, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, seated at center, gets instructions on using the slidewire baskets, part of the emergency egress system at Launch Pad 39A. Familiarization with pad procedures and systems is part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for the crew. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian space agency, is one of the seven STS-84 crew members for the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another member, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc740

With several of her fellow crew members watching, STS-84 Mission Speci...

With several of her fellow crew members watching, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, seated at center, gets instructions on using the slidewire baskets, part of the emergency egress system at Launch ... more

STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, at far right, as he talks to news media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc737

STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, ...

STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, at far right, as he talks to news media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Te... more

The STS-84 crew pose for a group photograph in front of the crew hatch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. In the front row, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Edward Tsang Lu; and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. In the back row, from left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Commander Charles J. Precourt and Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega. They are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc738

The STS-84 crew pose for a group photograph in front of the crew hatch...

The STS-84 crew pose for a group photograph in front of the crew hatch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. In the front row, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova ... more

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A’s emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The sevenmember crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. NASA astronaut Mario Runco Jr., next to Kondakova in a blue flight suit, is assisting the crew during TCDT. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc743

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets ins...

The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A’s emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The s... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Kondakova will be one of seven crew members on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another of the crew members, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc736

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Rus...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at... more

Wearing their orange launch and entry spacesuits, members of the STS-84 crew are all smiles as they pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A with the Space Shuttle Atlantis in the background. Kneeling in front are Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy, at right, of the European Space Agency, and Carlos I. Noriega. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale and Edward Tsang Lu, and Commander Charles J. Precourt. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc751

Wearing their orange launch and entry spacesuits, members of the STS-8...

Wearing their orange launch and entry spacesuits, members of the STS-84 crew are all smiles as they pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A with the Space Shuttle Atlantis in the background. Kneeling in f... more

The STS-84 crew pose for a photograph with members of the mission payload team in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dressed in their blue flight suits, from left, are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc752

The STS-84 crew pose for a photograph with members of the mission payl...

The STS-84 crew pose for a photograph with members of the mission payload team in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dressed in their blue flight suits, from left, are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, E... more

STS-84 crew members ride in and learn how to operate an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In the front seat is Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits beside her on top of the personnel carrier. Directly behind Hoggard, from left, are Commander Charles J. Precourt and Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova (sitting) of the Russian Space Agency. At the rear, from left, are Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale and Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc755

STS-84 crew members ride in and learn how to operate an M-113 armored ...

STS-84 crew members ride in and learn how to operate an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In the front seat is Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. G... more

STS-84 crew members practice emergency egress procedures in slidewire baskets at Launch Pad 39A. They are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. In the foreground are Commander Charles J. Precourt, at left, and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins. In the middle basket are Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, at left, and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. In the last slidewire basket at rear, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Edward Tsang Lu and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc748

STS-84 crew members practice emergency egress procedures in slidewire ...

STS-84 crew members practice emergency egress procedures in slidewire baskets at Launch Pad 39A. They are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. In the ... more

Proudly wearing red KSC Fire/Rescue hats, members of the STS-84 crew pause for a moment for a group photograph while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency; and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and Commander Charles J. Precourt. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff KSC-97pc756

Proudly wearing red KSC Fire/Rescue hats, members of the STS-84 crew p...

Proudly wearing red KSC Fire/Rescue hats, members of the STS-84 crew pause for a moment for a group photograph while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Miss... more

STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kondakova, of the Russian Space Agency, find a moment to communicate one-on-one, perhaps about upcoming and past experiences living on the Russian Space Station Mir, during a busy training session at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other five crew members are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. Kondakova spent 169 days in space as the cosmonaut flight engineer of the 17th main mission to Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. After Atlantis docks with Mir on STS-84, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff. KSC-97pc759

STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kon...

STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kondakova, of the Russian Space Agency, find a moment to communicate one-on-one, perhaps about upcoming and past experiences living on the Russ... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir-Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakova’s first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September KSC-97pc782

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Rus...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Land... more

STS-84 crew members greet press representatives and other onlookers after their arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Sunday evening (May 12, 1997), about an hour before the countdown clock will begin ticking toward the scheduled May 15 launch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-84. From left, are Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September KSC-97pc783

STS-84 crew members greet press representatives and other onlookers af...

STS-84 crew members greet press representatives and other onlookers after their arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility Sunday evening (May 12, 1997), about an hour before the countdown clock will begin ticki... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. This will be Kondakova’s first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on the Russian Space Station Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. During the STS-84 docking, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September KSC-97pc779

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Rus...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, arrives at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. This will be Kondakova’s first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC800

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC798

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC809

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shu...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth dockin... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC812

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Spa...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC805

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The crew of Mission STS-84 departs from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Leading the way, from left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins and Commander Charles J. Precourt. Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, walks behind Collins, and is followed by Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, with hands upraised. At rear, from left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega. The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its crew of seven are scheduled to lift off during an approximate 7-minute launch window which opens about 4:08 a.m. The exact liftoff time will be determined about 90 minutes prior to launch, based on Mir’s current location. The planned nine-day mission also will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger will return to Earth on Atlantis, and Foale will remain on Mir for about four months KSC-97PC790

The crew of Mission STS-84 departs from the Operations and Checkout Bu...

The crew of Mission STS-84 departs from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russia... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC803

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC808

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atl...

STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC810

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Spac...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth d... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC799

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC807

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shutt...

STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC801

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC804

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC806

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space...

STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a "thumbs up" as she dons her launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. Kondakova is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. This is her second trip into space, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on the Russian Space Station Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir KSC-97PC797

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a "thumbs up" as sh...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a "thumbs up" as she dons her launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. Kondakova is a cosmonaut with ... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC802

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as i...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth do... more

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew KSC-97PC811

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the ...

STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the six... more

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and other onlookers on KSC’s Runway 33 after landing of the successful nine-day mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Mission Specialist Elene V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega. Not shown are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and returning astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC853

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and ot...

STS-84 crew members give a "thumbs up" to press representatives and other onlookers on KSC’s Runway 33 after landing of the successful nine-day mission. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy o... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC839

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC845

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, roll...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC843

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC842

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis shortly before landing was taken by a fish-eye camera lens from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The Vehicle Assembly Building is in the background at left. The Shuttle Training Aircraft can be seen in the distance, at center. Atlantis is wrapping up its nine-day STS-84 mission, which was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger is returning to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC855

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlant...

This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis shortly before landing was taken by a fish-eye camera lens from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The Vehicle Assembly Building is in the b... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC841

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC850

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 3...

The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997... more

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate-Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC’s Runway 33 at the conclusion of the STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft with astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell at the controls is flying in front of Atlantis. Cockrell is acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC844

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and ...

Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate-Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC’s Runway 33 at the conclusion of the STS... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC852

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC838

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The firs... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. It will be the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC840

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 3...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. It will be the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle p... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. The Vehicle Assembly Building is at left. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences KSC-97PC851

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shu...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockre... more

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf and Scott Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf will transfer to the Mir for a long-duration stay, replacing Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth with the rest of the STS-86 crew. The mission is targeted for a Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis KSC-97PC1343

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shutt...

STS-86 crew members pose for a photograph after arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From left, are Mission Specialists V... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind them, the STS-86 crew poses for a photograph at Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left are Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, David A. Wolf, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1367

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind them, the STS-86 crew poses for a photograph at Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, and other crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis speak to media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. From right, after Wetherbee, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence and David A. Wolf. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1354

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, w...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, and other crew members of the Space Shuttle Atlantis speak to media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A du... more

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, to the right of Hoggard; Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency; and Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground, of the Russian Space Agency. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1353

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armo...

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. G... more

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the way as the next Space Shuttle crew does a practice walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A. The seven crew members are at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield is in foreground at left. Directly behind the pilot and commander, from left, are Mission Specialists Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, and Scott E. Parazynski. Bringing up the rear, from left, are Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, Wendy B. Lawrence and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-85, in May. The STS-86 launch aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1368

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the...

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, in foreground at right, leads the way as the next Space Shuttle crew does a practice walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A. The seven ... more

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, David A. Wolf and Wendy B. Lawrence. Standing, from left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1359

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to t...

STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph outside the hatch to the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front, from left, are Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Ti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are the three U.S. astronauts who will serve as mission specialists during the planned 10-day flight to the Russian Space Station Mir. Also serving as mission specialists will be Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. During the docking, Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1358

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Pa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, David A. Wolf, and Wendy B. Lawrence, at right, participate in emergency egress training at Launch Pad 39A as part of Ter... more

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. George Hoggard, in back at left, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, provides this part of the training to Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, to the right of Hoggard; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Scott E. Parazynski. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to conduct a spacewalk primarily to retrieve four suitcase-sized environmental payloads from the exterior of the Mir docking module. Also during the mission, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will transfer to the orbiting Russian station and become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since the last docking mission, STS-84, in May. Launch of Mission STS-86 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1352

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armo...

STS-86 crew members get a ride in, and learn to operate, an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of training exercises during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. G... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. --  With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind then, STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. From left, are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, Commander James D. Wetherbee, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1369

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the Space Shuttle Atlantis behind then, STS-86 crew members pose for a group photograph at Launch Pad 39A. Kneeling in front is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. From ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien, the two members of the STS-86 crew representing foreign space agencies, talk to press representatives before departing from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. They and the five other crew members were at KSC to participate in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). They will return to Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, for final prelaunch training. Titov is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; Chretien is an astronaut with the French Space Agency, CNES. Titov will make his fifth spaceflight, and second on the Space Shuttle, on STS-86 aboard Atlantis. Chretien has flown twice before as a research-cosmonaut on Russian missions; this will be his first Shuttle mission. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1376

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Geo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien, the two members of the STS-86 crew representing foreign space agencies, talk to press ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien, the two members of the STS-86 crew representing foreign space agencies, prepare to leave from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility after participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are returning to Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, for final prelaunch training. Titov is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; Chretien is an astronaut with the French Space Agency, CNES. Titov will make his fifth spaceflight, and second on the Space Shuttle, on STS-86 aboard Atlantis. Chretien has flown twice before as a research-cosmonaut on Russian missions; this will be his first Shuttle mission. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1375

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Geo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien, the two members of the STS-86 crew representing foreign space agencies, prepare to lea... more

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, at right, and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov prepare to leave from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility after participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are returning to Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, for final prelaunch training. Wetherbee will make his fourth spaceflight on STS-86, and his third as commander. Titov is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. He will make his fifth spaceflight, and second on the Space Shuttle. STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1377

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, at right, and Mission Specialist ...

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, at right, and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov prepare to leave from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility after participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Scott E. Parazynski practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Titov and Parazynski are scheduled to perform a spacewalk during the STS-86 mission, which will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis on Mission STS-86 is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1372

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Geo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Scott E. Parazynski practice emergency egress procedures in a slidewire basket as p... more

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press representatives and other onlookers after the astronauts’ arrival Monday at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynksi; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; and Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir for about four months. Liftoff of STS-86 aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25 KSC-97PC1409

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press ...

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee, with microphone, addresses press representatives and other onlookers after the astronauts’ arrival Monday at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The other crew members, from lef... more

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence (leaning into Parazynski); Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Parazynski and Lawrence had trained to live and work aboard the Russian station but were withdrawn from Mir training Parazynski because he was "too tall" to fit safely in the Russian Soyuz vehicle, and Lawrence because she is "too short" to fit in the Russian spacewalk suit. "Just right" Wolf is scheduled to become a Mir 24 crew member after the docking, to replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale for an extended stay aboard the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1413

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, famil...

The STS-86 crew enjoys a relaxing moment while greeting friends, families and other well-wishers the day before the scheduled Sept. 25 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialist ... more

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency stands in front of Launch Pad 39A the day before he is set to lift off on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The seven crew members came out to the pad to greet family members, friends and other well-wishers. Space veteran Titov will be making his fifth flight, second on the Space Shuttle. The scheduled Sept. 25 launch will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir KSC-97PC1412

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Sp...

STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency stands in front of Launch Pad 39A the day before he is set to lift off on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The seven crew members came... more

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski; Commander James D. Wetherbee; Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Mission Specialist Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; and Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency. After a weather briefing, the astronauts will don their orange launch and entry suits and depart for Launch Pad 39A where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff at about 10:34 p.m. EDT, Sept. 25. The exact launch time may vary slightly based on calculations of the Russian Space Station Mir’s precise location in space at the time of liftoff. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Shuttle with the Mir. Wolf is scheduled to become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis after more than four months on the Russian orbiting outpost KSC-97PC1419

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew membe...

As part of the final STS-86 prelaunch activities, the seven crew members gather for a snack and a photo opportunity in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence; P... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1429

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1433

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97pc1443

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1431

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1445

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1430

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1434

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1442

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists (and their nicknames for this flight) are, from left, "too tall" Scott E. Parazynski, "just right" David A. Wolf and "too short" Wendy B. Lawrence. The two mission specialists representing foreign space agencies are Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, in foreground at right, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, in background at right. Commander James D. Wetherbee and Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield are out of the frame. STS-86 is slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. Parazynski and Lawrence were withdrawn from training for an extended stay aboard the Mir Parazynski because he was too tall to fit safely in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, and Lawrence because she was too short to fit into a Russian spacewalk suit. The crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on the planned 10-day mission KSC-97PC1428

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press represe...

The five STS-86 mission specialists wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they depart from the Operations and Checkout Building. The three U.S. mission specialists ... more

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they prepare to board the astronaut van, at right, after departing from the Operations and Checkout Building. Leading the way are Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, at left, and Commander James D. Wetherbee. Mission Specialists David A. Wolf, at left, and Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency are directly behind them, followed by Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, at center. Bringing up the rear are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. The seven-member crew is en route to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff on a planned 10-day mission slated to be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle and the Russian Space Station Mir. Wolf is scheduled to transfer to the Mir 24 crew for an approximate four-month stay aboard the Russian space station. He will replace U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew KSC-97PC1427

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representativ...

STS-86 crew members smile and wave to the crowd of press representatives, KSC employees and other well-wishers as they prepare to board the astronaut van, at right, after departing from the Operations and Check... more

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 25 from Launch Pad 39A was at 10:34:19 p.m. EDT, within seconds of the preferred time, during a six-minute, 45-second launch window. The 10-day flight will include the transfer of the sixth U.S. astronaut to live and work aboard the Mir. After the docking, STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf will become a member of the Mir 24 crew, replacing astronaut C. Michael Foale, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. Foale has been on the Russian Space Station since mid-May. Wolf is scheduled to remain there about four months. Besides Wolf (embarking to Mir) and Foale (returning), the STS-86 crew includes Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Other primary objectives of the mission are a spacewalk by Parazynski and Titov, and the exchange of about three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between Atlantis and the Mir KSC-97PC1444

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the S...

The Space Shuttle Atlantis blazes through the night sky to begin the STS-86 mission, slated to be the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Liftoff on Sept. 2... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1495

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1504

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, talk about their recently completed U.S. space mission while walking under and around the orbiter Atlantis after landing on KSC’s Runway 15 of the Shuttle Landing Facility. This was Chretien’s third spaceflight, but first on the Space Shuttle. Titov previously flew four times in space, including once on the Space Shuttle as a mission specialist on STS-63. The nearly 11-day STS-86 mission ended with main gear touchdown at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997. STS-86 was the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir KSC-97PC1500

STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian S...

STS-86 Mission Specialists Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, at left, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, talk about their recently completed U.S. space mission w... more

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1505

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KS...

The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT on Oct. 6, 1997. The unofficial mission-elapsed time at main gear touchdown was 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS-86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-ahalf tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) can be seen in the background. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997, with an unofficial mission-elapsed time of 10 days, 19 hours, 20 minutes and 50 seconds. The first two KSC landing opportunities on Sunday were waved off because of weather concerns. The 87th Space Shuttle mission was the 40th landing of the Shuttle at KSC. On Sunday evening, the Space Shuttle program reached a milestone: The total flight time of the Shuttle passed the two-year mark. STS86 was the seventh of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf replaced NASA astronaut and Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, who has been on the Mir since mid-May. Foale returned to Earth on Atlantis with the remainder of the STS-86 crew. The other crew members are Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Wolf is scheduled to remain on the Mir until the STS-89 Shuttle mission in January. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-86 included the transfer of more than three-and-a-half tons of science/logistical equipment and supplies between the two orbiting spacecraft. Parazynski and Titov also conducted a spacewalk while Atlantis and the Mir were docked KSC-97PC1492

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The orbiter drag chute deploys after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on Runway 15 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at the conclusion of the nearly 11-day STS-86 m... more

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Station before flying back to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left, are Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence, Mission Specialist and recent Mir 24 crew member C. Michael Foale, Commander James D. Wetherbee, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, and Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES. Foale, who was on the Russian Space Station Mir since mid-May, returned to Earth aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis at the Oct. 6 KSC landing of Mission STS-86. He was replaced on the Mir by STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, who is scheduled to remain there until mid-January KSC-97PC1508

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Stri...

Members of the STS-86 crew pose for a last photograph at the Skid Strip on Cape Canaveral Air Station before flying back to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left, are Mission ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members participate with trainers in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. From left to right are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; Commander Terry Wilcutt; Boeing SPACEHAB Operations Engineer Jim Behling; Boeing SPACEHAB Crew Trainer Laura Keiser; an unidentified staff member (with mustache); Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency; and Pilot Joe Edwards. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nineday flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its sevenmember crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1724

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members participate with tra...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-89 crew members participate with trainers in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the missi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Several STS-89 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB module at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in preparation for the mission, slated to be the first Shuttle launch of 1998. From left to right are Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., and Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency, and Pilot Joe Edwards. The CEIT gives astronauts an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they will be working on-orbit. STS-89 will be the eighth of nine scheduled Mir dockings and will include a double module of SPACEHAB, used mainly as a large pressurized cargo container for science, logistical equipment and supplies to be exchanged between the orbiter Endeavour and the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day flight of STS-89 also is scheduled to include the transfer of the seventh American to live and work aboard the Russian orbiting outpost. Liftoff of Endeavour and its seven-member crew is targeted for Jan. 15, 1998, at 1:03 a.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A KSC-97PC1721

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Several STS-89 crew members participate ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Several STS-89 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) inside the SPACEHAB module at the SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility at Port Canaveral in prep... more

The STS-89 crew pose at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing Facility after flying in from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with the opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Endeavour is targeted for launch of STS-89 on Jan. 22 at 9:48 p.m. EST. From left to right are Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov, of the Russian Space Agency, Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., and James Reilly, Ph.D.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialist Michael Anderson. Mission STS-89 will be the first mission of 1998 and the eighth to dock with Russia’s Mir Space Station, where Thomas will succeed David Wolf, M.D., who has been on Mir since September 28. The STS-89 mission is scheduled to last nine days KSC-98pc114

The STS-89 crew pose at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing...

The STS-89 crew pose at Kennedy Space Center’s (KSC’s) Shuttle Landing Facility after flying in from NASA’s Johnson Space Center to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is hel... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test TCDT activities.  The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities.  Posing, from left to right, are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D. Commander Terrence Wilcutt Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D. Pilot Joe Edwards, Jr. and Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D.  The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.  After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour.  Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June.  STS-89 is scheduled for a January 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m.    Photo credit: NASA KSC-98PC-0122

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armor...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test TCDT activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Sp... more

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency gets ready to drive the M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities while George Hoggard, a training officer with KSC Fire Services, sits atop the vehicle. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc117

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agenc...

STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency gets ready to drive the M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities while George Ho... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency participates in a question and answer session for the media during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at KSC. The seven astronauts assigned to the eighth Shuttle-Mir docking flight are at KSC for this dress rehearsal for launch, which includes emergency egress training at the launch pad and culminates with a simulated countdown. The Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing preparations for liftoff, scheduled for Jan. 22. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D, will transfer to the Russian Space Station Mir, and succeed David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Shar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency participates in a question and answer session for the media during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (T... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- Standing in a slidewire basket at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A are, left to right, STS-89 Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D., with Pilot Joe Edwards Jr. The seven astronauts assigned to the eighth Shuttle-Mir docking flight are completing Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. A dress rehearsal for launch, the TCDT includes emergency egress training at the launch pad and culminates with a simulated countdown. STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D, will transfer to the Russian Space Station Mir and succeed David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. The Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing preparations for liftoff, scheduled for Jan. 22. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc129

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Standing in a slidewire basket at KSC’s...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Standing in a slidewire basket at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A are, left to right, STS-89 Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D., with P... more

The STS-89 crew pose in the white room at the entrance to the Space Shuttle Endeavour at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew include, from left to right, Mission Specialist James Reilly, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., and Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency. In back are, from left to right, Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., and Michael Anderson. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc128

The STS-89 crew pose in the white room at the entrance to the Space Sh...

The STS-89 crew pose in the white room at the entrance to the Space Shuttle Endeavour at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The crew include, from left to right... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency stands in a slidewire basket on the emergency egress system at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A, as Jim Bell, USA senior instructor for technical training, explains the egress system to him and to STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D, at right. Dr. Thomas will transfer to the Russian Space Station Mir and succeed David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. The seven astronauts assigned to the eighth Shuttle-Mir docking flight are completing Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. A dress rehearsal for launch, the TCDT includes emergency egress training at the launch pad and culminates with a simulated countdown. The Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing preparations for liftoff, scheduled for Jan. 22. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June KSC-98pc123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Shar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- STS-89 Mission Specialist Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency stands in a slidewire basket on the emergency egress system at KSC’s Launch Pad 39A, as Jim Bell, USA senio... more

The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. Posing, from left to right, are Mission Specialists Michael Anderson and Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D.; Commander Terrence Wilcutt; Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D.; Pilot Joe Edwards Jr.; and Mission Specialists Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency and James Reilly, Ph.D. The STS-89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m KSC-98pc122

The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier wh...

The STS-89 crew pose in front of an M-113 armored personnel carrier while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to ... more