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Roanoke County, Virginia. Historic map, Library of Congress
Richmond, Petersburg, and vicinity Genl. Grant's campaign war map /
Map of Roanoke County, Va. /, Confederate States of America

Map of Roanoke County, Va. /, Confederate States of America

Relief shown by hachures. Shows the names of some residents. Blue-line print. Oriented with north toward right. "Maps from the Confederate Engineer Bureau in Richmond, Va General J.F. Gilmer, Chief Engineer. Pr... More

Northern section of Roanoke County
Map of Roanoke County Va. : southern section /
Perspective map of the city of Roanoke, Va. 1891.

Perspective map of the city of Roanoke, Va. 1891.

Perspective map not drawn to scale. Bird's-eye-view. LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.), 962 Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image. Includes illus., index to points of interest, and... More

Log farmhouse, Roanoke County, Virginia

Log farmhouse, Roanoke County, Virginia

Frances Benjamin Johnston Collection (Library of Congress). No. 106.

[Bird's eye view, Roanoke, Va.]

[Bird's eye view, Roanoke, Va.]

H94839 U.S. Copyright Office Copyright deposit; Stone Printing & Mnfg. Co.; June 3, 1907. Copyright claimant's address: Roanoke, Va. Title derived from copyright deposit records.

Dependent Parents (See also 2157) R.L. Witt. He is apparently working on the railroad, but his three oldest children, here work in the Roanoke (Va.) Cotton Mills. Mamie is only 12 years old and earns very little. Home is very poorly kept. Mother would not be in the photo.  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
A young spooler in Roanoke (Va.) Cotton Mills.  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
Group of doffers and spinners working in Roanoke Cotton Mills (Va.) I counted seven apparently under fourteen and three under twelve years old.  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
Comparison of Ages. Some of the youngest workers in Roanoke (Va.) Cotton Mills. On right-hand end is seven year old Frank, a helper. Next to him is twelve year old Ronald, a doffer. On his right is Mamie Witt, twelve year old spinner. Girl on her right said fourteen years old, but doubtful. On her right, (with curl on shoulder) is Inex Kennedy, just fourteen. The second girl on her right is probably under fourteen. This is a small mill, running a small [force].  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
All are workers in Roanoke Cotton Mills (Va.) Smallest boy in the middle helps. See label No. 2162.  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
Comparison of Ages. Some of the youngest workers in Roanoke (Va.) Cotton Mills. On right-hand end is seven year old Frank, a helper. Next to him is twelve year old Ronald, a doffer. On his right is Mamie Witt, twelve year old spinner. Girl on her right said fourteen years old, but doubtful. On her right, (with curl on shoulder) is Inex [i.e., Inez?] Kennedy, just fourteen. The second girl on her right is probably under fourteen. This is a small mill, running a small force.  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
Mamie Witt. Runs one side in Roanoke Cotton Mills, Roanoke, Va. She is twelve years old and helps support an able-bodied, dependent father. (see photo 2160).  Location: Roanoke, Virginia.
$3,500 Reward Offered ($3,000 by the Governor of Virginia and $500 by the County of Carroll) for the arrest, dead or alive, of the following parties, to be distributed as follows: Sidna Allen $1,000, Claud Allen {doll

$3,500 Reward Offered ($3,000 by the Governor of Virginia and $500 by ...

Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML. Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 188, Folder 4.

Birds eye view of Roanoke City, Va.
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Horton House, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Raleigh Tavern, Roanoke County, Virginia
Garst Log Fort, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Garst Log Fort, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Horton House, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Trouts Farm, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Buena Vista, Roanoke, Roanoke County, Virginia
Raleigh Tavern, Roanoke County, Virginia
Business section, Roanoke, Va.

Business section, Roanoke, Va.

J 9273 U.S. Copyright Office Copyright deposit; W. Carlton Parker; July 17, 1931. On front: "Copyright 7-14-1931 by W. Carlton Parker."

Panorama of Roanoke, Va., from Mill Mountain
Farmer plowing. Roanoke County, Virginia
Farmer plowing cut-over land. Roanoke County, Virginia
Farmer plowing cut-over land. Roanoke County, Virginia
Farmer near Roanoke, Virginia
Manpower, junior size. What's a home without its sidewalk scrap pile? Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia see to it that each home has given enough scrap to make the scrap collectors monthly visit worthwhile. When the truck appears, every youngster in the neighborhood pitches in to help load it
Manpower, junior size. The third front--unified, enthusiastic, patriotic--banded together where there are no sides but "our side." School children in Roanoke, Virginia listened eagerly as speakers explained to them the work of the junior commandos
Manpower, junior size. What's a home without its sidewalk scrap pile? Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia see to it that each home has given enough scrap to make the scrap collectors monthly visit worthwhile. When the truck appears, every youngster in the neighborhood pitches in to help load it
Salvage. School children get in the scrap. The school children of America were officially organized for a nationwide salvage program starting on Monday, October 5, 1942. The children are going into the field as a junior army engaged in a major campaign for victory. Plans included the laying out of definite areas in each community to be assigned to specific groups of children. Plans were also made for holding meetings, collecting scrap, storing it and getting it to central points for shipment. Roanoke, Virginia has already gotten its program underway. This is one of the first official pictures of the school salvage campaign (taken in Roanoke where it is actually in operation) and it presents a fair sample of what is taking place all over the country. This picture shows children receiving instructions in school, after which they will be made lieutenants, sergeants, corporals, etc., and undertake the actual collection of scrap metal, rubber, fats and greases
Manpower, junior size. Mild-looking little girls of Roanoke, Virginia, but they are "scrappers for victory." The little sisters of our fighting men back up their big brothers at the front by joining America's junior army. These fifth graders receive final instructions from their teacher on the scrap collection drive
Salvage. School children get in the scrap. The school children of America were officially organized for a nationwide salvage program starting on Monday, October 5, 1942. The children are going into the field as a junior army engaged in a major campaign for victory. Plans included the laying out of definite areas in each community to be assigned to specific groups of children. Plans were also made for holding meetings, collecting scrap, storing it and getting it to central points for shipment. Roanoke, Virginia has already gotten its program underway. This is one of the first official pictures of the school salvage campaign (taken in Roanoke where it is actually in operation) and it presents a fair sample of what is taking place all over the country. This picture shows children receiving instructions in school, after which they will be made lieutenants, sergeants, corporals, etc., and undertake the actual collection of scrap metal, rubber, fats and greases
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collection as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. She's put her playthings aside for a more important game. This Roanoke, Virginia youngster is one of America's thousands of school age boys and girls who are self-appointed scrap collectors for the duration
Manpower, junior size. A couple of husky junior commandos add to a neighborhood scrap pile in Roanoke, Virginia. Bedsprings, coal buckets, bird cages, stoves--no piece of unused metal is safe from the hands of these patriotic youngsters, who are out to see that their older brothers in the armed forces have the guns, ships, and ammunition they need to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. Door-to-door salesmen for their Uncle Sam, these Roanoke, Virginia youngsters are scouring the neighborhoods for scrap metal and rubber which will be processed into vital war materials
Manpower, junior size. "Who wants to be a junior commando?" teacher asks. Willing hands shoot up and eager voices cry "Yes!" Everyone in this Roanoke, Virginia class wants to be one of the thirty-million children banding together throughout the United States to form America's junior army, young fighters to collect scrap for ammunition
Manpower, junior size. Soldiers without uniforms but determined home front fighters, nevertheless. These newly appointed junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia, are so eager to get into the "scrap" that not even a heavy rain can stop them from work. They map plans for the distribution of leaflets on their block to inform housewives that the "Scrap for Victory" campaign is on
Manpower, junior size. What's a home without its sidewalk scrap pile? Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia see to it that each home has given enough scrap to make the scrap collectors monthly visit worthwhile. When the truck appears, every youngster in the neighborhood pitches in to help load it
Manpower, junior size. Soldiers without uniforms, but home front fighters nevertheless. Newly appointed junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia, receive instructions for collecting scrap, following a star-spangled rally launching the campaign
Manpower, junior size. Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia, follow up on their fat collection drive with a visit to the local rendering plant to see what happens to the household fats they have collected during the week. They're learning firsthand how explosives are derived from bacon grease and meat fats
Manpower, junior size. Too young to help? Not the youngsters of Roanoke, Virginia. They're out to win the war by gathering up every piece of scrap metal, every bit of worn out rubber, and all waste fats and greases in the town
Manpower, junior size. "Neither rain nor snow...nor gloom of night...stays this courier from the completion of his appointed rounds." A junior commando of Roanoke, Virginia, this boy scout makes the weekly rounds of all available scrap in the neighborhood, despite unfavorable weather
Manpower, junior size. Junior commando spirits ran high when children of all creeds and colors sang together the national anthem. Roanoke, Virginia school children took the initiative in mobilizing the first intensified junior commando organization to collect scrap for America's fighting forces
Manpower, junior size. Johnny's got a man-sized job for the duration. His role in this war is a vital one, for every bit of household scrap must be collected to feed America's wartime steel furnaces. Like this Roanoke, Virginia youngster, boys and girls from coast to coast are organizing into squads to collect all available neighborhood scrap
Manpower, junior size. It takes a good right arm to collect all the household scrap that's needed for the nation's armaments, and these Roanoke, Virginia youngsters have just what it takes. Note the badge on the boy's collar; it reads "Lieutenant: Junior Commando Salvage Drive"
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collection as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collection as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. Johnny's got a man-sized job for the duration. His role in this war is a vital one, for every bit of household scrap must be collected to feed America's wartime steel furnaces. Like this Roanoke, Virginia youngster, boys and girls from coast to coast are organizing into squads to collect all available neighborhood scrap
Manpower, junior size. It takes a good right arm to collect all the household scrap that's needed for the nation's armaments, and these Roanoke, Virginia youngsters have just what it takes. Note the badge on the boy's collar; it reads: "Lieutenant: Junior Commando Salvage Drive"
Manpower, junior size. "Helping Uncle Sam is the best possible work for you," Mrs. Bertha Traynham, an evangelist, tells her grandchildren, junior commandos in Roanoke, Virginia. The children have brought her leaflets explaining the necessity of the scrap collection drive
Manpower, junior size. She's put her playthings aside for a more important game. This Roanoke, Virginia youngster is one of America's thousands of school age boys and girls who are self-appointed scrap collectors for the duration
Manpower, junior size. Saturday's a holiday for most of the nation's small-fries, but to these youngsters of Roanoke, Virginia, it's fat collection day. As part of their junior commando activities, these boys and girls collect all fats and greases from local housewives during the week, and turn it over to school authorities on Saturday. From here, the fats are sent to a rendering plant where precious glycerin will be derived from it
Manpower, junior size. This gingham-clad member of the nation's junior army, in Roanoke, Virginia, would rather rummage through a musty attic for scrap rubber and metal than play hopscotch-- when her country needs all the scrap that she and thirty-million other school children can collect
Manpower, junior size. When these hardy fighters of America's junior army do a job, they do it right--with typical American efficiency. Out to see for themselves what happens to the scrap they collect, they pay a visit to a scrapyard in Roanoke, Virginia, and watch the hydraulic press crush jalopies into rectangular bales for shipment to steel mills
Manpower, junior size. "Who wants to be a junior commando?" teacher asks. Willing hands shoot up and eager voices cry "Yes!" Everyone in this Roanoke, Virginia class wants to be one of the thirty-million children banding together throughout the United States to form America's junior army, young fighters to collect scrap for ammunition
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collection as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. A couple of husky junior commandos add to a neighborhood scrap pile in Roanoke, Virginia. Bedsprings, coal buckets, bird cages, stoves--no piece of unused metal is safe from the hands of these patriotic youngsters, who are out to see that their older brothers in the armed forces have the guns, ships, and ammunition they need to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. Too young to help? Not the youngsters of Roanoke, Virginia. They're out to win the war by gathering up every piece of scrap metal, every bit of worn-out rubber, and all waste fats and greases in the town
Manpower, junior size. Discussing the best ways to collect the maximum of scrap from the neighborhood, Mrs. Bertha Traynham of Roanoke, Virginia finds that her young grandson is well informed about locations of the most productive garrets and cellars. An evangelist, Mrs. Traynham promises to help the drive by talking about it at her meetings
Manpower, junior size. Notes from parents giving permission to their sons and daughters to join the Roanoke, Virginia junior army are received by teacher Doris Jordan. Now these newly appointed junior commandos are ready to collect scrap for victory
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collection as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. Saturday's a holiday for most of the nation's small-fries, but to these youngsters of Roanoke, Virginia, it's fat collection day. As part of their junior commando activities, these boys and girls collect all fats and greases from local housewives during the week, and turn it over to school authorities on Saturday. From here, the fats are sent to a rendering plant where precious glycerin will be derived from it
Manpower, junior size. Proud young fighters in Uncle Sam's junior army visit a scrap yard in Roanoke, Virginia to see for themselves what happens to the scrap they collect for our war industries. One of the workers explains to the children how the acetylene torch he holds cuts heavy metal into the shapes required for melting by the steel mills
Manpower, junior size. Too young to help? Not the youngsters of Roanoke, Virginia. They're out to win the war by gathering up every piece of scrap metal, every bit of worn out rubber, and all waste fats and greases in the town
Salvage. School children get in the scrap. The school children of America were officially organized for a nationwide salvage program starting on Monday, October 5, 1942. The children are going into the field as a junior army engaged in a major campaign for victory. Plans included the laying out of definite areas in each community to be assigned to specific groups of children. Plans were also made for holding meetings, collecting scrap, storing it and getting it to central points for shipment. Roanoke, Virginia has already gotten its program underway. This picture shows scrap being dug out of an attic by the "junior commandos"
Manpower, junior size. Any fats today? This Roanoke, Virginia fourth grader collects waste fats from each house in his neighborhood and brings it to school every Saturday morning. The collected ingredients of fats are sent to the local rendering plant for processing into glycerine--vital ingredient of explosives
Manpower, junior size. Two barefoot junior commandos in Roanoke, Virginia, wriggle their toes with delight as they study their instructions for collecting scrap for Uncle Sam's great army. Directions for the scrap collection were given to the children at the huge star-spangled rally that launched the campaign
Manpower, junior size. These hardy determined young fighters of the Jamison Elementary School in Roanoke, Virginia, are bent upon doing their best as members of Uncle Sam's newest home front fighting team, the junior army. Their teacher is explaining the seriousness of Uncle Sam's scrap metal, rubber, and fats shortage and how they are to be mobilized to collect this vital scrap
Manpower, junior size. Nobody played hookey the day teacher Doris Jordan at Jamison Elementary School explained how every pupil can help win the war. These Roanoke, Virginia youngsters, along with some thirty million other young Americans, are being mobilized into the nation's newest home front fighters, the junior army, to collect scrap for ammunition
Manpower, junior size. The charge of the scrap brigade in Roanoke, Virginia includes such methods of collecting as this pony cart. The patriotic and energetic youngsters of the town are making an all-out effort to corner every available piece of scrap in the city, so that their soldier and sailor brothers will have the shells, guns, and tanks with which to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. What's a home without its sidewalk scrap pile? Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia see to it that each home has given enough scrap to make the scrap collectors monthly visit worthwhile. When the truck appears, every youngster in the neighborhood pitches in to help load it
Manpower, junior size. "Any scrap for Uncle Sam?" Captain Charles Wentworth, a junior commando in Roanoke, Virginia, hands Mrs. John Farr a leaflet announcing the hunt for precious metal and rubber. Units of three children to a block combed every house for scrap and brought it to their own houses where city trucks carted it away
Manpower, junior size. Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia, follow up on their fat collection drive with a visit to the local rendering plant to see what happens to the household fats they have collected during the week. They're learning firsthand how explosives are derived from bacon grease and meat fats
Manpower, junior size. "Neither rain nor snow...nor gloom of night...stays these couriers from the completion of their appointed rounds." Junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia, these two young girls are making their weekly rounds of all available scrap in their neighborhood, despite unfavorable weather
Manpower, junior size. Mild-looking little girls of Roanoke, Virginia, but they are "scrappers for victory." The little sisters of our fighting men back up their big brothers at the front by joining America's junior army. These fifth graders receive final instructions from their teacher on the scrap collection drive
Manpower, junior size. A mild-mannered little girl--she looks as though she would rather tuck her baby doll into bed than toss old iron into a waiting scrap truck. But along with thirty-million other young Americans, she is a "scrapper for victory" and is spending her days gathering scrap for Uncle Sam's fighting men
Manpower, junior size. When these hardy fighters of America's junior army do a job, they do it right--with typical American efficiency. Out to see for themselves what happens to the scrap they collect, they pay a visit to a scrapyard in Roanoke, Virginia, and watch a hydraulic press reduce old automobile bodies and parts to steel mills
Manpower, junior size. She's put her playthings aside for a more important game. This Roanoke, Virginia youngster is one of America's thousands of school age boys and girls who are self-appointed scrap collectors for the duration
Manpower, junior size. Excited school children craned their necks to watch the Jefferson High drum and bugle corps march into the auditorium. The "military band" opened the junior commando rally in Roanoke, Virginia, launching the campaign to collect scrap
Manpower, junior size. Her arms are full of shells and guns and parts for ships and tanks. One of the Roanoke, Virginia junior commandos, this youngster has collected every piece of scrap in the neighborhood to help make armaments to beat the Axis
Manpower, junior size. The spirit of '42. The Jefferson High School drum and bugle corps in Roanoke, Virginia started the junior commando rally with a fanfare and a drum roll. Outside of the auditorium, the "military band" prepared to enter the hall where Roanoke school children awaited the opening of the rally that was to number them as part of America's junior army to collect scrap for our armed forces
Manpower, junior size. A treat for the junior commandos of Roanoke, Virginia! Ensign Andrew Blair, U.S. Navy Reserves extends congratulations to the youngsters at their scrap rally for their whole-hearted efforts to collect material for Uncle Sam's armed forces
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