The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine

A corporate action is an event initiated by a public company that brings or could bring an actual change to the securities—equity or debt—issued by the company. Corporate actions are typically agreed upon by a company's board of directors and authorized by the shareholders. For some events, shareholders or bondholders are permitted to vote on the event. Examples of corporate actions include stock splits, dividends, mergers and acquisitions, rights issues, and spin-offs.

Some corporate actions such as a dividend (for equity securities) or coupon payment (for debt securities) may have a direct financial impact on the shareholders or bondholders; another example is a call (early redemption) of a debt security. Other corporate actions such as stock split may have an indirect financial impact, as the increased liquidity of shares may cause the price of the stock to decrease. Some corporate actions, such as name changes or ticker symbol changes to better reflect a company's business focus, have no direct financial impact on the shareholders; securities may be listed under a different security identifier (e.g. ISIN, CUSIP, Sedol) however. For example, "Apple Computers" changed its name to Apple Inc.

Corporate action Media

50,719 media by topicpage 1 of 508
Maurel de Calessanne, May 1788, Discourse Opposing French Judicial Reorganization; in French

Maurel de Calessanne, May 1788, Discourse Opposing French Judicial Reo...

Discourse Opposing French Judicial Reorganization; in French

Rail inquiry chairman's statement is unfair charge of M.P. bondholder's counsel. Washington, D.C., Nov. 10. Replying to the statement of Chairman Truman of the Senate Rail Inquiry that the proposed reorganization plan for the Missouri Pacific Railroad by the Alleghany Corporation would result in the M.P. being run in the same old way, W. Lloyd Kitchel, Counsel for the Stedman Committee, representing M.P. Bondholders, challenged the statement as being unfair and added, that he believed that questioning had not brought out the true facts of the reorganization. On the left is Eugene J. Conroy, Secretary to the Stedman Committee.
Reorganization hearing, Washington, D.C., Aug 2. New Chairman of the president's reorganization committee hears arguments for and against the president's plan, left to right: Senate Minority Leader Charles McNary of Oregan, Senate Majority Leader Albin Barkley of KY, and the new Chairman of the Committee Sen. James F. Byrnes of S.C. who was appointed to take the place of Sen. Joe Robinson...
Virginia Senator. Washington, D.C. Jan 13. Democratic Senator Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Reorganization
Senator Byrd tells press of governmental reorganization. Washington, D.C., Jan. 12. Senator Harry F. Byrd of Virginia, Chairman of the Senate committee studying governmental reorganization, held a press conference shortly after President Roosevelt made public his plan for governmental reorganization. Senator Byrd told newsmen that he was endorsing the Chief Executive's plan but objected to many of its details
Testifies on railroad reorganization bill. Washington, D.C., May 12. Leslie Craven, New York attorney, testifying today before the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee on the railroad reorganization bill
Senate Committee on Governmental Reorganization. Washington, D.C. Jan 14. The Senate Committee, of which Senator Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia is chairman, on Government Reorganization Economies met this morning to consider Brookings Institute recommendations denying President Roosevelt the free hand he desires in altering the Executive Branch. The recommendations were for consolidations in Federal Credit Agencies to save at least $30,000,000. In the photograph, left to right; Senator Charles L. McNary, of Oregon; Majority Leader; Senator John G. Townsend, Jr., Delaware; Senator Harry Flood Byrd; Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney, Wyoming; and Senator Joseph T. Robinson, Senate Majority Leader
Government reorganization hearing Washington, D.C., Aug 2. Dr. Charles E. Merriam, a member of the President's Government Reorganization Committee, today urged the special Senate Reorganization Committee to take favorable action on the Robinson bill to revamp federal administration agencies, arguing in favor of the bill, Merriam contended it would destroy the patronage system and promote more effective congressional supervision through committees on accounts and planning...
Virginia Senator. Washington, D.C. Jan 13. Democratic Senator Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Reorganization
$24,500,000 savings for government? Washington, D.C. Jan. 14. F.W. Powell, (left) Chairman of the Brookings Institute, non-partisan statistical foundation, submitted today to the Senate Committee on Governmental Reorganization a report of a study made by his organization showing how savings of $24,500,00 could be accomplished by the government by the consolidation of the FHA and the HOLO(?). Mr. Powell is shown with his Assistant C.O. Hardy
Virginia Senator. Washington, D.C. Jan 13. Democratic Senator Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Reorganization
Ceremonies - Fort Russel, Fort Sill, and Camp Wadsworth - The last parade of the 7th New York National Guard. Regiment at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina before reorganization

Ceremonies - Fort Russel, Fort Sill, and Camp Wadsworth - The last par...

Ceremonies - Fort Russel, Fort Sill, and Camp Wadsworth

Reorganization committee, 12/14/22
Denby and Weeks testified before the first meeting this year of the Committee on the Reorganization Admin. Branch of the Gov.
Reorganization committee, 1/7/24
Sen. Smoot, Sec. Hoover, Rep. Mapes (Reorganization Conference), 12/10/25
At Labor Nonpartisan League Meeting. Washington D.C., March 8. Sidney Hillman(left), Secretary Treasurer of the Labor Nonpartisan League, went into a huddle with Edward F. McGrady, Assistant Secretary of Labor, before the opening session today of the Labor Nonpartisan League Convention in Washington. Speaking before the convention a little later, Secretary McGrady in regard to the President's reorganization of the Judiciary declared that something must be done immediately about the small group (Supreme Court) who have seized power greater than the President and the whole Congress, 3/8/1937
In spotlight before Senate Judiciary Committee. Washington, D.C., April 6. Former President of the New York Bar, Charles C. Burlingham, appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee today to voice his opposition to President Roosevelt's court reorganization plan. Burlingham told the Committee that liberals, radicals and labor "May curse the day," when the president's judiciary plan was conceived. Burlingham said that he could think "of only one other Attorney General--whom I will not name--would not have resigned rather than condone or have any part or lot in such a shabby enterprise" as the court bill, 4/6/1937
For and against. Washington D.C., July 22. Senator Henry F. Ashurst, (left) Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and a strong adherent of the President's Court Reorganization Bill, greets Senator Edward R. Burke, who is leading the bloc of Democratic Senators opposing the bill, as he arrives to attend the extraordinary meeting of the Sneate Judiciary Committee today, 7/22/37
Virginia Senator. Washington D.C. July 9. Senator Harry F. Byrd, Chairmand of the Special Senate Committee on reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government, as he presided at the hearing of the Committee today, 7/9/37
Court plan for returns to senate duties. Washington, D.C., Nov. 24. Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana, bitter foe of the President's Court Reorganization plan, returned to his senate duties today for the first time since the special session convened. He was kept busy most of the day opening the voluminous mail which has accumulated during his absence. 11/24/37
Montana Senator. Washington D.C. July 16. A new informal picture of Senator Burton K. Wheeler, of Montana, who leading the bloc of Democratic Senators opposing the President's Court Reorganization Bill, 7/16/37
All alone. Washington, D.C., Aug. 13. Senator Edward R. Burke, who bitterly opposed the president's court reorganization bill and likewise opposed the nomination of Senator Black, sits in a corner and observes the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee approve the nomination of Black by a vote of 5-1, 8/13/37
S.E.C. reports to White House. Washington, D.C., April 13. The Securities and Exchange Commission held an informal conference this morning before leaving for the White House where Chairman James M. Landis told President Roosevelt that the Commission hopes to complete its corporate reorganization study soon and transmit a report to Congress. the study, Landis said, will deal with foreign bond defaults, Judicial reorganization procedure and other reorganization plans. he indicated the report may result in regulatory legislation "to protect investors" in the photograph, left to right: Commissioners George C. Matthews and William O. Douglas; Chairman James M. Landis; Commissioners J.D. Ross and Robert E. Healy, 4/13/1937
President's court plan "leap in dark" Yale professor tells Senate Committee. Washington, D.C., March 31. Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee today, Edwin Borchard Professor of Constitutional Law at Yale, declared the President's court reorganization plan is a "speculative leap in the dark unless a revolution in the attitude of the judges toward the constitution is anticipated". Prof. Borchard further declared the bill is unsound and ineffective and that it should be voted down, 3/31/1937
Democratic government vs.against organized force of reaction. Washington D.C., March 8. Before six hundred labor leaders from all parts of the country, Senator Robert Lafollette, Progressive of Wisconsin, delivered the principal speech at the opening session of the Convention of the Labor Nonpartisan League today. Urging the league to back President Roosevelt's court reorganization plan to the limit, Senator Lafollette said: "In the coming legislative struggle the strength of popular democratic government in America will be pitted against the organized force of reaction," 3/8/1937
Senator Byrd tells press of governmental reorganization. Washington, D.C., Jan. 12. Senator Harry F. Byrd of Virginia, Chairman of the Senate committee studying governmental reorganization, held a press conference shortly after President Roosevelt made public his plan for governmental reorganization. Senator Byrd told newsmen that he was endorsing the Chief Executive's plan but objected to many of its details

Senator Byrd tells press of governmental reorganization. Washington, D...

Title from unverified data on the negative or negative sleeve. Gift; Harris & Ewing, Inc. 1955. General information about the Harris & Ewing Collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.hec Temp. no... More

Declares farmers against Roosevelt judiciary reorganization plan. Washington, D.C., March 24. Louis J. Taber, Master of the National Grange, clenches his fists to emphasize a point today as he appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to express his organization's opposition to the president's court reorganization plan. Taber declared the "grass roots" of America opposed the program because it threatened to result in Supreme Court that would be "supreme in it's political guess work," 3/24/1937
"Putting the blast on." Washington, D.C., Aug. 9. At a specially called press conference today, Senator Royal Copeland of New York, charged that President Roosevelt "does more in five minutes to destroy democratic harmony than can be re-established in a generation of Jefferson Island picnics and peace dinners." He also told newsmen that the president's opposition to candidacy for the New York Mayorality is "directly tied in" with court issue. Copeland fought the court reorganization plan, 8/9/37
St. Louis educator opposes court plan. Washington, D.C., April 14. The president's court reorganization plan is "without precedent, without reason and without merit," Rev. Linus Lilly head of the St. Louis University Law School, told the Senate Judiciary Committee today, 4/14/1937
$3,500,000 saving. Washington D.C. July 9. Merger of the Federal Housing Administration and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board would save the Government $3,500,000 annually, Charles O. Hardey, staff member of the Senate Committee on Reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government. 7/9/37
Congratulations. Washington D.C., March 8. Following his fiery speech before the Convention of the Labor Non-Partisan League today, Senator Robert F. Lafollette, Progressive of Wisconsin, is congratulated by John L. Lewis, United Mine Worker President and Chairman of the Executive Committee of the League, and Sidney Hillman (center), Secretary Treasurer. In his speech Senator Lafollette urged the league to campaign aggressively on behalf of President Roosevelt's court reorganization plan. Six hundred labor leaders from all parts of the country are attending the convention, 3/8/1937
U.S. Forest Service could be scuttled if government reorganization plan goes thru, senate committee told. Washington, D.C., Aug 3. Appearing before the Senate Committee considering President Roosevelt's Government Reorganization Program, Col. W.B. Greely former Chief of the U.S. Forest Service, gave warning today that powers granted in the bill might mean the Forest Service "would be dismembered like Poland, scattered to the four winds or abolished altogether". He also charged that the proposal to change the name of the Interior Department to the Department of Conservation was a plan to transfer the Forest Service out of the Department of Agriculture to the Interior Department, 8/3/37
Princeton Prexy gives Senate Committee views on president's court reform plan. Washington, D.C., March 24. Harold W. Doods, President of Princeton University, testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee today pictured the President's court reorganization plan as "a scheme by which President Roosevelt hopes to control the opinions of the court." The committee is now hearing witnesses opposed to the president's plan, 3/24/1937
Head Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Washington D.C. July 9. John H. Fahey, Chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, as he appeared at the hearing of the Special Senate Committee on reorganization of the Executive Branch of the Government through a merger of the Federal Housing Administration and the Federal Home Loan Bank Borad. 7/9/37
A.F. of L. head sees President Roosevelt. Washington D.C., July 23. A.F. of L. President William Green arriving at the White House today to keep an appointment with President Roosevelt. Questioned by Newsmen later, Green said he told the President the Federation was "very much dissapointed" over Senate action on the Judiciary Reorganization Bill. Green said he also expressed to the President the hope that Congress would pass a minimum wage and maximum hour bill and a housing measure at this session, 7/23/37
Chesapeake and Ohio to get control of Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad. Washington, D.C., May 14. Carroll M. Shanks, Chairman of the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad Mortgage Bondholders Protective Committee, told the Senate Railroad Financing Committee today that the proposed reorganization plan for the C.&E.I now pending on federal courts would give the control to the Chesapeake and Ohio. The Senate Committee has been investigating the $700,000 load procured by the C.&E.I from the Midland Bank of Cleveland. Later testimony brought out at the hearing proved that the Chesapeake and Ohio actually made the loan with the bank acting as the road's agent, 5/14/1937
Senatorial horseplay. Washington D.C., July 22. Will you join us or not? Democratic Senators Burton K. Wheeler (left) and Edward R. Burke, (right) bitter opponents of the President's Court Reorganization Plan, engage in a bit of horseplay with Senator William H. Diedrich, Pro-Court Senator, as the attend a special meeting of the Senate Judiciary Committee today, 7/22/37
Judiciary Committee hears N.Y. Supreme Justice on proposed Court reform plan. Washington, D.C., March 20. Ferdinand Pecora (left) New York Supreme Court Justice and former member of the Securities and Exchange Commission, told the Senate Judiciary Committee today that he favored the president's plan for reorganization of the Judiciary. Pecora drew upon his experience as an investigator for the Senate Banking and Currency Committee to outline a broad situation which he said required the President's program as a solution. He is shown with Senator Royal S. Copeland of New York, 3/20/1937
Exclusive interview for youngest reporter "covering" Senate Judiciary Committee. Washington, D.C., March 30. Youngest reporter "covering" the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the President's court reorganization plan, nine-year-old Nicky Arundel, editor of Nicky's News in Washington, scooped his rivals today when he received an exclusive interview with Senator Pat McCarran, (left) of Nevada, and Senator F. Ryan Duffy of Wisconsin. Both Senators are members of the Judiciary Committee, 3/30/1937
Appear before the Senate Judicary. Washington, D.C., March 18. Appearing before the Senate Judicairy Committee today in defense of the Presidents Supreme Court reorganization plan were Charles Grove Haines of the University of Calif. who is a Professor of Political Science, left: and Dean Leon Green, Dean fo the Law School of Northeaster Univ., right
Washington D.C., March 8. Following his fiery speech before the Convention of the Labor Non-Partisan League today, Senator Robert F. Lafollette, Progressive of Wisconsin. In his speech Senator Lafollette urged the league to campaign aggressively on behalf of President Roosevelt's court reorganization plan. Six hundred labor leaders from all parts of the country are attending the convention, 3/8/1937
Montana Senator. Washington, D.C., May 24. Senator Burton K. Wheeler, of Montana, pictured in his office at the Capitol today. Although a Democrat, Senator Wheeler is one of the leaders in fight against the president's court reorganization plan, 5/24/1937
Awaiting decision on Labor Relations Act. Washington, D.C., April 5. Senator Robert F. Wagner, (right) of New York, author of the Wagner Labor Relations Act, and Rep. William P. Connery, Jr., of Massachusetts, who sponsored the legislation in the house, are anxiously awaiting the decision of the Supreme Court on the validity of the act. The Supreme Court was due to reach a decision today but adjourned without announcing its ruling. The ruling, which cannot now be announced until next Monday, is expected to have an important bearing on the President's court reorganization plan, 4/5/1937
Congratulations. Washington D.C., March 8. Following his fiery speech before the convention of the Labor Non-Partisan League today, Senator Robert F. Lafollette, Progressive of Wisconsin. In his speech Senator Lafollette urged the league to campaign aggressively on behalf of President Roosevelt's court reorganization plan. Six hundred labor leaders from all parts of the country are attending the convention, 3/8/1937
In spotlight at hearing on Government Reorganization Program. Washington, D.C., Aug 4. Luther Gulick, (right) member of the President's Reorganization Advisory Committee, is informally questioned by Senator [...] F. Byrd, preceding his (Gulick) appearance before the Senate Committee studying the Robinson Government Reorganization Bill. After cross-examining Gulick, Senator Byrd attacked the power given the Presdient in the Robinson Bill as a "Sud[...] on the part of Congress, 8/4/37
Court plan opponent. Washington D.C., July 22. Once the faired-haired boy at the White House, Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney of Wyoming, is now bitterly opposing the President's Court Reorganization plan. He is shown leaving the extraordinary meeting of the Senate Judiciary Committee today, 7/22/37
New York Senator reads telegraphic protests against Government Reorganization Bill. Washington, D.C., March 28. The office of Senator Royal S. Copeland, democrat of New York, was virtually flooded today with telegraphic protests against the Government Reorganization Bill which seemed certain to pass the Senate. The Senator is pictured as he found time to read a few of the wires, 3/28/38
Discuss government reorganization with President Roosevelt. Washington, D.C., Sept. 23. Charles E. Merriam, (left) and Louis Brownlow, members of the President's Reorganization Committee, leaving the White House today after discussing government reorganization with President Roosevelt, 9/23/38
Senate lobby committee again refuffed. Washington, D.C., April 20. Efforts of the Senate Lobby Committee to obtain records of the National Committee to uphold Constitutional Government hit another snag today when Sumner Gerard, Treasurer of the Organization, testified he did not have in his "control" a list of contributors to the National Committee. Gerard, A brother of James Gerard, former Ambassador to Germany, was questioned by the committee in his investigating of Lobby activities uding congressional consideration of the Government reorganization bill, 4/20/38
Telegraphic protests against U.S. Merger Bill Flood U.S. Senate. Washington, D.C., March 28. Extra messengers were needed today to deliver the thousands of telegraphic protests against the Government Reorganization Bill which began the flood the United States Senate early this morning, 3/38/38
Reads protest against Government Reorganization Bill. Washington, D.C., March 28. Montana's Senator Burton K. Wheeler found his desk stacked high with telegraphic protests against the Government Reorganization Bill when he arrived at his office in the Capitol today, 3/28/38
FORGET NATION'S BUSINESS FOR NATIONAL PASTIME. WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL 18. CONGRESSIONAL BICKERING, THE REORGANIZATION BILL, AND THOUGHTS OF ANOTHER DEPRESSION WERE FAR FROM THE MINDS OF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AND VICE PRESIDENT GARNER TODAY AS THEY MET AT THE 1938 BASEBALL SEASON'S OPENER BETWEEN THE SENATORS AND THE PHILADELPHIA ATHLETICS
Swamped with protests against reorganization bill. Washington, D.C., April 2. Chairman of the House Rules Committee, Rep. John J. O'Conner of New York, was virtually swamped today with telegraphic protests against the Reorganization Bill. He is shown reading a few of the requests during a respite from the floor, 4/2/38
Mr. Bosley of reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado, feeding calves. Livestock are a most essential part of the reorganization program
Mr. Bosley, sitting on his tractor. Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley of reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado, feeding calves. Livestock are a most essential part of the reorganization program
Mr. Bosley, who is head of the Bosley reorganization unit. Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley of Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado, feeding a sow
Windmill and milk-house of the Bosley reorganization unit. Baca County, Colorado
Scene in the adobe brick chicken house of Mr. Bosley, Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley on his tractor and planter on the Bosley reorganization unit. Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley of the Bosley reorganization unit feeding his hogs on his farm in Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley, sitting on his tractor. Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado
New administrative assistant to president. Washington, D.C., July 17. James H. Rowe., Jr., who was last week appointed by President Roosevelt to be an Administrative Assistant to the President under the new Government Reorganization Bill, posed for this new picture today. Rowe has been Assistant to the General Edwin M. Watson, White House Secretary and Military Aide, 7/17/39
Canning peaches at the home of Mr. Bosley on his reorganization unit
Adobe brick chicken house on farm of Mr. Bosley. Reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley of the reorganization unit standing in a field of sudan grass on his farm in Baca County, Colorado. This grass is one of the best cover crops which can be grown in this region in order to bring it back from its present stricken stage due to dust storms
Plenty of feed has been stored for the winter on the Bosley reorganization unit. Baca County, Colorado
Leading fight for reorganization. Washington, D.C., March 24. Rep. Lindsay Warren, N.C. and Senator James Byrnes, S.C. talking over problems of the reorganization bill this morning. -Made for Time Magazine- 3-24-39
Mr. Bosley of Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado, getting ready to start up the milk separator
Scene on the range of the Bosley reorganization unit. Baca County, Colorado
Mr. Bosley, of the Bosley reorganization unit in Baca County, Colorado, with canned fruits in his cellar
Mr. Bosley of Bosley reorganization unit, Baca County, Colorado, feeding a sow
Home of Mr. Bosley and the Bosley reorganization unit. A project commanding FSA (Farm Security Administration) attention. Baca County, Colorado
Canning peaches at home of Mr. Bosley on his reorganization unit in Baca County, Colorado
Leading fight for reorganization. Washington, D.C., March 24. Rep. Lindsay Warren, N.C. and Senator James Byrnes, S.C. talking over problems of the reorganization bill this morning. -Made for Time Magazine- 3-24-39

Leading fight for reorganization. Washington, D.C., March 24. Rep. Lin...

Title from unverified caption data received with the Harris & Ewing Collection. Gift; Harris & Ewing, Inc. 1955. General information about the Harris & Ewing Collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pn... More

Memorandum from Archibald MacLeish to Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., September 24, 1940

Memorandum from Archibald MacLeish to Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., Septemb...

In his memorandum to Arthur A. Houghton, Jr., Archibald MacLeish inquires whether the Library of Congress "oughtn't to prepare ourselves now for a possibly more effective future policy in the matter of gifts."

General Order No. 992, Office of the Librarian, Library of Congress, October 31, 1940

General Order No. 992, Office of the Librarian, Library of Congress, O...

General Order announcing the appointment of Luther Harris Evans as Chief Assistant Librarian.

Letter from Archibald MacLeish to Herbert Putnam, June 6, 1941

Letter from Archibald MacLeish to Herbert Putnam, June 6, 1941

Archibald MacLeish expresses his relief over Herbert Putman's understanding about the use of "income from the Hegeman Estate for a consultantship on an annual basis" which "violated the purpose of the giver..."

Memorandum from Archibald MacLeish to Luther Harris Evans, December 30, 1942

Memorandum from Archibald MacLeish to Luther Harris Evans, December 30...

Archibald MacLeish's response to Luther Harris Evans' letter of December 29, 1942 about the Library of Congress rare book policy.

Memorandum from Archibald MacLeish to Frederick Goff, April 7, 1942
Memorandum from Luther Harris Evans to Archibald MacLeish, December 29, 1942

Memorandum from Luther Harris Evans to Archibald MacLeish, December 29...

Letter to Archibald MacLeish about the Library of Congress rare book policy.

Letter from Felix Frankfurter to Archibald MacLeish, December 6, 1943

Letter from Felix Frankfurter to Archibald MacLeish, December 6, 1943

Felix Frankfurter praises the new Quarterly Journal of Current Acquisitions.

General Order No. 1179, Library of Congress, April 17, 1943

General Order No. 1179, Library of Congress, April 17, 1943

The Librarian of Congress outlines the work of the new staff advisory committee.

Letter from Augustus E. Giegengack to Archibald MacLeish, July 17, 1943

Letter from Augustus E. Giegengack to Archibald MacLeish, July 17, 194...

Augustus E. Giegengack, Office of the Public Printer, Government Printing Office, accepts the changes Archibald MacLeish wishes to make in the printing of the Annual Report of the Library of Congress.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Archibald MacLeish, December 4, 1944

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Archibald MacLeish, December 4,...

The White House telegram notifies Archibald MacLeish that he can move ahead with the appointment of the Register of Copyrights.

Special Order No. 114, Office of the Librarian, Library of Congress, June 3, 1944

Special Order No. 114, Office of the Librarian, Library of Congress, J...

Special Order announcing the appointment of Elsie Rackstraw as Chief of the Loan Division.

Memorandum from Lewis Hanke to David C. Mearns, May 1, 1944

Memorandum from Lewis Hanke to David C. Mearns, May 1, 1944

Lewis Hanke, Hispanic Division, urges a discussion of the future of the new Quarterly Journal of Current Acquisitions.

[Urban planning proposals for Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Aerial photograph of the U.S. Capitol and the Mall overlaid with suggested additions and reorganization]

[Urban planning proposals for Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Aerial ...

Architectural Forum, January, 1963. Title devised by Library staff. Forms part of: The Paul Rudolph Archive. Unprocessed in PR 13 CN 2001:126.

2-5 Mr. Joe Kane/Family; 6-13 Judge William Gunter and Stephen Clay; 14-19 Press Announcement on Reorganization
2-7 Meeting on Reorganization; 8-13 The President and Mrs. Carter

2-7 Meeting on Reorganization; 8-13 The President and Mrs. Carter

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

Reorganization Executives; Jimmy Carter - Meeting with Black Caucus
EOP Reorganization Press Conference

EOP Reorganization Press Conference

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

Reorganization Meeting

Reorganization Meeting

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

Womans Political Caucus; fr. 30-34 Reorganization meeting

Womans Political Caucus; fr. 30-34 Reorganization meeting

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

Meeting on Reorganization

Meeting on Reorganization

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

Signing S626 - Reorganization Bill

Signing S626 - Reorganization Bill

Carter White House Photographs: Presidential

2-7 President announcing Emergency Prepardness Reorganization; 10-12 President with proposed computer system
3-4 Civil Service Reorganization; 5-16 World Hunger Commission; 17-24 US Senate Youth Group
Previous

of 508

Next