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Before F.C.C. Washington, D.C., March 16. Gerald King, President of Standard Radio and president of the Association of Radio Transcription Producers, as he appeared before the Federal Communications Commission
Auto magnates appear before Monopoly Committee. Washington, D.C., Dec. 6. Into a huddle went Paul G. Hoffman, right, President of the Studebaker Corporation and H.C. Vance, Chairman of the Board, just before they appeared before the Monopoly Committee today. Both declared before the committee that the automobile industry, and American producers in general, do not wish to take advantage of the European war to raise prices
Motor magnate appears before Monopoly Committee. Washington, D.C., Dec. 6. H.S. Vance, left, Studebaker Corporation Board Chairman, told the Monopoly Committee today that the automobile industry, and american producers in general, do not wish to take advantage of the European war to raise prices. Shown with Vance is Paul G. Hoffman, President of the Studebaker Corporation who also testified
Steel export representatives tell Monopoly group of Europe-America Steel Cartel. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. S.M. Bash of New York, Vice President of the Bethlehem Steel Export Corp. and Manager of the Steel Export Association today told the Monopoly Committee that U.S. Steel producers were urged to join the International Steel Cartel or suffer lower export prices and European invasion of American markets. He explained that his group consults with the European group to 'divide up the world' on a basis of tonnage with a yearly quota for each. If one oversells his quota, he pays a penalty to the other group. He said about a dozen American steel firms were members of the American Association
Monopoly Committee studies milk marketing practices. Hears Co-op manager. Washington, D.C., May 1. B.F. Beach, Secretary Manager of the Michigan Milk Producers' Association was the first witness today before the reopened hearings by the Temporary National Economic Committee. The Committee heard Beach describe the marketing agreements entered into by his organization, a cooperative, which, he stated, guarantee a market for all members
American sugar producers

American sugar producers

Cartoon shows Special Envoy to Cuba Tasker H. Bliss standing before an army of sugar beets. In the background a man "Sugar Refining Trust" watches with a smile. Bliss holds a rolled sheet of paper "Cuban recipr... More

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Manufacturing gases at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland.   Top of carbon monoxide producers at phosgene plant

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Manufacturing g...

Date Taken: 7/22/1918 Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Manufacturing gases at Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland.   Fuel-gas and carbon monoxide producers

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Manufacturing g...

Date Taken: 7/22/1918 Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland.  Carbon monoxide unit.  Detail of the producers

Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal - Edgewood Arsena...

Date Taken: 11/11/1918 Chemical Warfare Service - Plants - Edgewood Arsenal

First picture of Coal Commission. This is the first picture showing all five members of the Bituminous Coal Commission. Chairman Charles F. Hosford, Jr., issued a statement, a few minutes before the picture was made, that the group "deplored" efforts to stampede coal producers into refusing to come under the new Guffey Coal Act." From the left: seated, Walter H. Maloney, Chairman Nosford, and George F. Acret. Standing, C.F. Smith, left, and Percy Tetlow, 10/25/35
Chairman of Coal Commission. Chairman Charles F. Hosford, Jr., of the Bituminous Coal Commission, photographed at his desk where he is making a determined fight against the "Interests" trying to prevent coal producers from cooperating. 10/26/35
Head of congressional bloc to help butter, cheese and egg producers. Washington, D.C., Nov. 8. Dairy State Legislators opened a drive today to force the House Agricultural Committee to include in the new Farm Bill a program of benefits for the nation's butter, cheese and milk producers. Headed by Rep. August H. Anderson, R. of Minn. a bloc of Congressmen plan to meet with representatives of the National Cooperative Milk Producers Federation to work out details for a proposed three point program for dairy farmers. The program includes: increased tariff on dairy imports as well as vegetable oils, regulation of imports so that the incoming products will have to meet the same sanitary requirements as the domestic - a provision that could amount to embargo in some cases, bloc members said. Limitation on the use of cotton and tobacco acreage for dairying purposes. 11/8/37
Oil executive predicts suffocated marketing competition if Gillette bill is passed. Washington, D.C., April 21. Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee today, J. Howard Pew, President of the Sun Oil Co., declared that passage of the Gillette Bill prohibiting marketing of petroleum products by producers or refiners would suffocate marketing competition, 4/21/38
Urges permanent Federal Bureau of Fine Arts. Washington, D.C., Feb. 28. A militant campaign will shortly be waged for creation of a permanent Federal Bureau of Fine Arts, Burgess Meredith, acting President of Actors Equity, today told the Senate Education and Labor Subcommittee. Actors, producers and artists have urged the committee to aid the "preservation and development of American Culture" by reporting favorably to create such a bureau, 2/28/38
Glass Magnate called to stand of monopoly investigation. Washington, D.C., Dec. 14. William E. Levis, President of the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, largest glass producers in the country, today took the stand before Government Monopoly Investigators. It was revealed in his testimony that Hartford Empire Co. paid part of its royalties on glass manufacturing patents over to Owens-Illinois from 1924 to 1935. Levis stated that his patent business was, as a whole, unprofitable. He is talking here to Senator William H. King of Utah, a member of the committee, 12/14/38
Appears before Senate Military Affairs Committee. Washiington, D.C., April 5. Prof. Bradley Stoughton, of Lehigh Univ. prepresenting the Independent Steel and Iron Producers Committee on Scrap, told the Senate Military Affairs Committee today that he favored the passage of the Schwellanbach Bill to permit scrap iron expports only on presidential license, he argued that scrap export not only drains the country of one raw material but depletes the nation of other raw materials, such as iron ore, and lessens employment here, 4/5/38
Hayes office General Counsel protests Neely Bill to regulate movie sales. Washington, D.C., April 3. Charles C. Pettijohn, general counsel for the Hayes office, movieland's self-censoring group, was on of the first witnesses before the Senate Interstate Commerce Subcommittee which heard actor Robert Montgomery this morning. Gesturing wildly, he eloquently pleaded against passage of Senator Neely's bill to prohibit 'block booking' and 'blind selling', movie trade practices which remove theater owner's choice in selecting his movie bill. He offered to bring Walt Disney before the Committee to prove the disastrous effects of the bill if made law, saying that the biggest hits are seldom expected by either producers or theater managers. General Hollywood expert opinion was that 'Snow white and the Seven Dwarfs' would never sell, he said. 4-3-39
Overcoats for bees the latest. Beltsville, Md., April 11. W.J. Nolan, Apiculturist of the Bee Culture Laboratory at National Agricultural Research Center here, is demonstrating to Miss Lorry Van Houten, how overcoats for bees protect these honey producers from howling winds of winter. Formerly the packing for double decked hives was sawdust and TA(?) paper, now these cold-blooded insects can huddle under overcoats consisting of double blankets, with an added canvas cover.
Endorses 1938 A.A.A. Farm Program. Washington, D.C., Jan. 9. Southern cotton farmers today demanded that Congress retain the basic principles of the New Deal Farm Program but asked additional funds for benefit payments to producers. Ranson Aldridge, above, President of the Mississippi Farm Bureau federation, told a group of Senators and Representatives that we feel that in the frame work of the 1938 A.A.A. we have a program that can be made to work, 1/9/39
Underground at Old Ben number eight mine. These men are on a "man-trip" which goes three and half miles to the face of the coal. General caption: Most of the giant coal producers in Franklin Couny have completely mechanized underground operations. Old Ben number eight, because of shortage of working capital, has not been able to install loading machines to handle the entire output of the mine. Accordingly, the mine still uses the now obsolete pit car loader, and even employs a few hand loaders alongside modern, highly efficient automatic loading machines
Film prexy defends practice of "block booking." Washington, D.C., April 6. Sidney R. Kent, President of the 20th Century Fox Film Corp., testifying before the Senate Interstate Commerce Subcommittee today, defended block booking of Motion Pictures as legitimate and traditional business practices. The producers right to sell their merchandise in their own way, Kent said, is sacred so long as they are "In free and open competition." 4-6-39
Southern farmers demand basic principles of New Deal Farm Program be retained. Washington, D.C., Jan. 9. As two southern Senators Ellison D. Smith, left, of South Carolina, Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee, and John H. Bankhead of Alabama, listen intently, Ranson Aldridge, President of the Mississippi Farm Federation, today told a group of Senators and Representatives that southern farmers want the basic principles of the New Deal Farm Program retained but at the same feel that additional funds should be allotted for benefit payments to producers, 1/9/39
Gasoline is bought in tank car lots for sale to the members of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Material is bought in carload lots by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Farmers waiting at the lumber yard office of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenx, Arizona
Farmer with his truck loaded with goods which he has bought from the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Card index system of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona. This cooperative has over 12,000 members, the majority of whom are farmers
The United Producers and Consumers Cooperative maintains an automobile repair shop. In this picture, a worker is repairing a farmer's truck with an electric welder. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative loading lumber into his car. Phoenix, Arizona
Members of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative in one of the offices of the association. This cooperative is open to all races. Phoenix, Arizona
Secretary of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative examining advertising material. Phoenix, Arizona
Lumber is sawed to size and order at the United Producers and Consumer Cooperative at Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative having a drum filled with gasoline at the warehouse. Phoenix, Arizona
A.L. Viles, producers' representative on the Rubber Priorities Committee
Tile fence posts and brick are standard part of stock of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
The cashier of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona
A large stock of roofing is carried for the members by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative looking at a shower curtain displayed by salesman in the household equipment department. Phoenix, Arizona
Inflating a new tire for installation on car of member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Members and their children at the wrapping desk of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Cement in carload lots is bought by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona
Changing a tire at the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative service station. Phoenix, Arizona
United Producers and Consumers Cooperative repairman replacing light bulb in automobile of member. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative looking at a lantern in the store of the organization. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative buying a small tool grinder. Phoenix, Arizona
Lumber being loaded onto truck at the Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the service department of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative winding an armature. He was sent by the cooperative to Chicago to learn his trade
Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona, trying on a pair of gloves
Farmer loading cut lumber from warehouse of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives
Furniture and linoleum are included in the stock of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative at Phoenix, Arizona
Railroad siding and warehouses of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Interior of United Producers and Consumers Cooperative Store at Phoenix, Arizona. This cooperative has over 12,000 members
The United Producers and Consumers Cooperative maintains its own automobile service department. Phoenix, Arizona
Salesman demonstrating an electric refrigerator to members of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona
President of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Farmers' cars in front of store and warehouse of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Large stock of metal roofing is carried by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Officer of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative examining books of the organization. Phoenix, Arizona
Purchasing agent of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Members of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative waiting to be served at the lumberyard office. Phoenix, Arizona
Mill work doors and windows at the warehouse of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Member of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative selecting a drill. Phoenix, Arizona
Farmer loading lumber onto his truck at the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Entrance to United Producers and Consumers Cooperative Store, Phoenix, Arizona. All purchases are cash
A.L. Viles, producers' representative on the Rubber Priorities Committee
Two farmers meet and shake hands at the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
A complete line of cut lumber is carried by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative at Phoenix, Arizona
Arizona photographs - Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph.
The United Producers and Consumers Cooperative is adding a complete line of poultry supplies for its members. Phoenix, Arizona
The United Producers and Consumers Cooperative sells electical equipment in large quantities to its members. Phoenix, Arizona
A complete line of electric lighting equipment is carried by the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative of Phoenix, Arizona
Interior of store of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative, Phoenix, Arizona
Bulletin board for the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
President of the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative who was the first member. Phoenix, Arizona
Water bags and canteens, necessities in the arid Southwest, on sale at the United Producers and Consumers Cooperative. Phoenix, Arizona
Employee of United Producers and Consumers Cooperative arranging stock of hardware. Phoenix, Arizona
Salinas, California. Demonstration of combined guayule harvester and chopper at the Intercontinental Rubber Producers
Milk being delivered to Twin City Milk Producers Association, Elk River, Minnesota. Here it is put in truck tanks and delivered to bottling and pasteurizing plants in the cities
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Four-year-old guayule shrubs. Guayule requires from seven to fifteen inches of rainfall annually, ten inches being ideal for successful cultivation
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Digger of guayule seedlings in the nursery
Salinas, California. Putting guayule seed into flats for drying at the Intercontinental Rubber Producers
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Harry Baucher, head chemist, works on deresinating tests
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Four-year-old guayule shrubs. To the layman, guayule looks a great deal like sage brush
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Gathering guayule seed with a vacuum machine
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. This factory can produce 10,000 pounds of rubber from guayule daily
Dr. William B. McCallum, manager of the International Rubber Company of California (growers and producers of guayule rubber) with guayule plant, Salinas, California
Bits and pieces display. Parts needed by U.S. Maritime Commission being inspected at the first OPM (Office of Personnel Management) permanent exhibit at which samples of needed defense equipment and parts are shown to prospective producers. The exhibit opened on Tuesday, December 23 in the Boatman's Bank Building in St. Louis, Missouri. Bits and pieces of needed war goods were exhibited by fourty-eight holders of large war contracts and by the Army, the Navy, and the U.S. Maritime Commission. It is planned to change the articles displayed in this exhibit as some of them become under contracts or subcontracts. Representatives of the Contract Distribution Division will be available regularly to advise manufacturers attending the exhibits. Similar exhibits are scheduled to open shortly in other cities throughout the country
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Demonstration of combined harvester and chopper of guayule. This machine was designed and built by the company
Bits and pieces display. Parts needed by U.S. Maritime Commission being inspected at the first OPM (Office of Production Management) permanent exhibit at which samples of needed defense equipment and parts are shown to prospective producers. The exhibit opened on Tuesday, December 23 in the Boatmen's Bank building in Saint Louis, Missouri. Bits and pieces of needed war goods were exhibited by fourty-eight holders of large war contracts and by the Army, Navy and the U.S. Maritime Commission. It is planned to change the articles displayed in this exhibit as some of them become placed under contracts and subcontracts. Representatives of the Contract Distribution Division will be available regularly to advise manufacturers attending the exhibit. Similar routine exhibits are scheduled to open shortly in other cities throughout the country
Salinas, California. Putting seed into the planter used in guayule nursery of the Intercontinental Rubber Producers
Salinas, California. Interncontinental rubber producers. Demonstration of digger used in guayule nursery. In actual operations, the tops of the plants are cut off by the mower before they are dug. When transplanted, the guayule seedling weighs about two grams
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Mower which cuts off tops of guayule seedlings in nursery before transplanting
Salinas, California. Guayule seed mixed with sawdust coming from planter in nursery of the Intercontinental Rubber Producers
Salinas, California. Intercontinetal rubber producers. Putting glass frames over drying guayule seed at the nursery
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. The man on the machine is transplanting guayule seedlings into the field
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Digger of seedlings in the guayule nursery
Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Chopped and crushed guayule. The shrub is treated like this before going through various rollers in the factory in the process of rubber extraction
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