PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout

  • account_boxLogin
100 media by topicpage 1 of 1

Local residents are transported to waiting ships and patrol craft during an evacuation of the island of Dominica. The evacuation is a precaution in the event of a possible volcanic eruption

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Caribbean Sea Scene Camera Operator: SPC Charles W. Gross Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

Crash and salvage crewmen wearing proximity suits stand by an aircraft as a precaution during an engine start-up aboard the US Navy (USN) Nuclear-powered Aircraft Carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69) Country: Mediterranean Sea (MED) Scene Camera Operator: PH3 Gregory A. Pinkley, USN Release Status: Released to ... more

Sand bags line the edge of the sidewalk along Fields Avenue just outside the main gate of Clark Air Base. The sand bags are in place as a precaution against possible flooding in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Clark Air Base State: Luzon Country: Philippines(PHL) Scene Camera Operator: TSGT Val Gempis Release Status: Released to Public Combined Militar... more

Sand bags protect the entrance of the base exchange as a precaution against possible flooding on the base in the aftermath of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Clark Air Base State: Luzon Country: Philippines(PHL) Scene Camera Operator: TSGT Val Gempis Release Status: Released to Public Combined Militar... more

MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Rob Alger, USAF, 138th Security Police Squadron, Oklahoma Air National Guard, checks drivers licenses and ID cards of personnel coming onto the base. This security precaution is in response to the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: NOBLE EAGLE Base: Tulsa State: Oklahoma (OK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: 138th Fighte... more

A US Army (USA) Soldier dons his Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level Four (MOPP-4) gear, as a precaution to a suspected chemical attack in Iraq, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: IRAQI FREEDOM Country: Iraq (IRQ) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service... more

US Navy (USN) SEAMAN (SN) Gavin Takata and SN Roger Lewis rig lifelines aboard the USN Aircraft Carrier USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63). Lifelines run the perimeter of the ship as a safety precaution to prevent Sailors and equipment from falling overboard

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) Country: Pacific Ocean (POC) Scene Camera Operator: PHAN Patrick Heil, USN Release Status: Released to Public Combined Mil... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lightning strike on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is captured by an Operational Television camera. Eleven lightning strikes occurred within .35 miles of the pad during a thunderstorm July 10 as space shuttle Endeavour was prepared for launch. Mission managers decided to delay Endeavour's planned liftoff July 11 as a precaution to allow engineers and safety personnel time to analyze data and retest systems on the orbiter and solid rockets boosters. The next launch attempt for the STS-127 mission is planned for Sunday, July 12, at 7:13 p.m. EDT. The Operational Television cameras can be used to triangulate the location of lightning strikes. Other detection systems include the Cloud-To-Ground Lightning Surveillance System, Strikenet/National Lightning Detection Network, Lightning Induced Voltage Instrumentation System and the Catenary Wire Lightning Instrumentation System. Endeavour will deliver the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, in the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the International Space Station. STS-127 is the 29th flight for the assembly of the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Analex KSC-2009-3940

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lightning strike on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is captured by an Operational Television camera. Eleven lightning strikes occurred within .35 miles of the ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technicians Richard Gillman and Steve Lay, and SDO technician Brian Kittle. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1049

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are SDO technician Brian Kittle and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1052

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., test conductors from ASTROTECH and Kennedy Space Center monitor data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1058

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., test conductors from ASTROTECH and Kennedy Space Center monitor data received from the clean room as te... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1056

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that wi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1053

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that w... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1051

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a team of Kennedy Space Center spacecraft fueling specialists and engineers monitors data received from the clean room as technicians sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1057

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the control room at the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., a team of Kennedy Space Center spacecraft fueling specialists and engineers monitors data received from... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare the equipment necessary to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1054

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare the equipment necessary to sample the monomethylhyd... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which is protectively covered. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1055

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., Boeing spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center take a sample of the monomethylhydrazine propellant that wi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be loaded aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. From left are Boeing technician Steve Lay and ASTROTECH mission/facility manager Gerard Gleeson. The hydrazine fuel is being sampled for purity before it is loaded aboard the spacecraft. The technicians are dressed in self-contained atmospheric protective ensemble suits, or SCAPE suits, as a safety precaution in the unlikely event that any of the highly toxic chemical should escape from the storage tank. The nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer was loaded earlier in the week which is customarily followed by loading of the fuel. Propellant loading is one of the final processing milestones before the spacecraft is encapsulated in its fairing for launch. SDO is the first mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program and is designed to study the causes of solar variability and its impacts on Earth. The spacecraft's long-term measurements will give solar scientists in-depth information to help characterize the interior of the Sun, the Sun's magnetic field, the hot plasma of the solar corona, and the density of radiation that creates the ionosphere of the planets. The information will be used to create better forecasts of space weather needed to protect the aircraft, satellites and astronauts living and working in space. Liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket is targeted for Feb. 9 from Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For information on SDO, visit http://www.nasa.gov/sdo. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1050

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., spacecraft fueling technicians from Kennedy Space Center prepare to sample the monomethylhydrazine propellant that will be ... more

Petal, Miss., Feb. 18, 2013 -- This weather radio is on at the Petal Disaster Recovery Center as a necessary safety precaution. FEMA advises anyone that lives in a part of the country that has any potential for severe weather events, keep such a radio on at all times. Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

The original finding aid described this as: Date Taken: 2013-02-18 00:00:00 UTC Photographer Name: Marilee Caliendo City/State: Petal, MS Disasters: Mississippi Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding (DR-41... more

Inspection of an Ontario Salt Mine | Inspection d’une mine de sel en Ontario

Learn what Ministry of Labour health and safety inspectors look for during an inspection visit of a mine development at a soft rock salt mine in Goderich, Ont. A descriptive transcript for this video is availa... more