The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine
Topic

next generation

870 media by topicpage 1 of 9
The Atlas 1 (AC-73) carrying the GOES-1, the first of five next-generation advanced weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sits poised on Complex 36-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station ready for launch. 94PC-583

The Atlas 1 (AC-73) carrying the GOES-1, the first of five next-genera...

The Atlas 1 (AC-73) carrying the GOES-1, the first of five next-generation advanced weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sits poised on Complex 36-B at Cape Canaver... More

Gates McFadden, star of Star Trek, The Next Generation, signs autographs and shakes hands after her performance. Her appearance is sponsored by the USO for Task Force Eagle soldiers stationed in Tuzla

Gates McFadden, star of Star Trek, The Next Generation, signs autograp...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: JOINT ENDEAVORTASK FORCE EAGLE Base: Tuzla Country: Bosnia And/I Herzegovina (BIH) Scene Camera Operator: SGT Larry Aaron, US... More

Gates McFadden, star of "Star Trek, the Next Generation", takes time after a USO performance to sign autographs, shake hands and take photos with soldiers deplolyed to Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR. Her appearances, sponsored by the USO were seen through the theater by Task Force Eagle soldiers stationed in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Gates McFadden, star of "Star Trek, the Next Generation", takes time a...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: JOINT ENDEAVOR Base: Tuzla Country: Bosnia And/I Herzegovina (BIH) Scene Camera Operator: SGT Larry Aaron, USA Release Statu... More

NASA Administrators Award for:  1. 'Turning Goals into Reality' presented to Center TRACON Automation System Team, Langley Research Center October 9, 1998 2. 'Turning Goals into Reality 1998 Goal Award for  Excetptional Progress toward Next-Generation Design Tools and Experimental Aircraft  acrylic ARC-1998-A98-0242-1

NASA Administrators Award for: 1. 'Turning Goals into Reality' presen...

NASA Administrators Award for: 1. 'Turning Goals into Reality' presented to Center TRACON Automation System Team, Langley Research Center October 9, 1998 2. 'Turning Goals into Reality 1998 Goal Award for Exc... More

Colonel (ret) Gail S. Halvorsen, the legendary "Candy Bomber" from the Berlin Airlift, speaks from his heart expressing the honor felt after the Air Force named their new Next Generation Small Loader (NGSL) 25k loader after him. The ceremony was held at Dover AFB on 19 June 2001, the test site for the new Halvorsen 25k loader. The Halvorsen has the highest reach of any loader with a height of 225 inches

Colonel (ret) Gail S. Halvorsen, the legendary "Candy Bomber" from the...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Dover State: Delaware (DE) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: AMC Scene Camera Operator: William M. Plate Jr., C... More

Aerial view as US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian, Commander, 43rd Fighter Squadron (FS), 325th Fighter Wing (FW), Air Education and Training Command (AETC), Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida (FL), flies Raptor 01-018, the first of 48 new F/A-22 Raptor`s assigned to Tyndall`s 325th FW. The flight, took place September 26, 2003, is a major milestone and will now enable the 43rd FS to begin formally training pilots to fly this next-generation fighter. The F/A-22 combines stealth, supercruise, maneuverability and many other features enabling a first look, first shot, first kill capability that will provide continued air dominance for generations to come

Aerial view as US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "C...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Tyndall Air Force Base State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: ACC Scene Camera Operator: Tsgt Mi... More

Aerial view as US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian, Commander, 43rd Fighter Squadron (FS), 325th Fighter Wing (FW), Air Education and Training Command (AETC), Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida (FL), flies Raptor 01-018, the first of 48 new F/A-22 Raptor`s assigned to Tyndall`s 325th FW. The flight, took place September 26, 2003, is a major milestone and will now enable the 43rd FS to begin formally training pilots to fly this next-generation fighter. The F/A-22 combines stealth, supercruise, maneuverability and many other features enabling a first look, first shot, first kill capability that will provide continued air dominance for generations to come

Aerial view as US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "C...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Tyndall Air Force Base State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: ACC Scene Camera Operator: Tsgt Mi... More

US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian, Commander, 43rd Fighter Squadron (FS), 325th Fighter Wing (FW), Air Education and Training Command (AETC), Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida (FL), flies Raptor 01-018, the first of 48 new USAF F/A-22 Raptors assigned to Tyndall's 325th FW. The flight, took place September 26, 2003, is a major milestone and will now enable the 43rd FS to begin formally training pilots to fly this next-generation fighter. The F/A-22 combines stealth, supercruise, maneuverability and many other features enabling a first look, first shot, first kill capability that will provide continued air dominance for generations to come

US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Tyndall Air Force Base State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: AETC Scene Camera Operator: Tsgt M... More

US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian, Commander, 43rd Fighter Squadron (FS), 325th Fighter Wing (FW), Air Education and Training Command (AETC), Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), Florida (FL), flies Raptor 01-018, over the Florida (FL) coast line. This is the first of 48 new USAF F/A-22 Raptors assigned to Tyndall's 325th FW. The flight, took place September 26, 2003, is a major milestone and will now enable the 43rd FS to begin formally training pilots to fly this next-generation fighter. The F/A-22 combines stealth, supercruise, maneuverability and many other features enabling a first look, first shot, first kill capability that will provide continued air...

US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: US Air Force (USAF) Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Jeffrey "Cobra" Harrigian, Commander, 43rd Fighter Squadron (FS), 325th Fighter Win... More

Next Generation Thermal Protection Materials testing: Interactive Heating Facility IHF-148 ARC-2003-ACD03-0238-064

Next Generation Thermal Protection Materials testing: Interactive Heat...

Next Generation Thermal Protection Materials testing: Interactive Heating Facility IHF-148

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HEATING FACILITY; IHF-148 Run 002 West Panel ARC-2003-ACD03-0238-010

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HE...

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HEATING FACILITY; IHF-148 Run 002 West Panel

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HEATING FACILITY; IHF-148 Run 002: Rack 002 West Panel: 2.5D  CC W/RTVIC (b) 12/2/03 pre- test ARC-2003-ACD03-0238-007

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HE...

NEXT GENERATION THERMAL PROTECTION MATERIALS TESTING IN INTERACTIVE HEATING FACILITY; IHF-148 Run 002: Rack 002 West Panel: 2.5D CC W/RTVIC (b) 12/2/03 pre- test

US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral (ADM) Vern Clark, (center), answers questions from members of the Projection Forces Subcommittee during testimony on the Navy's Fiscal Year 2006 Plans and Programs for the DD(X) Next-Generation Multi-Mission Surface Combatant Ship. ADM Clark shares the witness table with Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Mr. Ken Kreig, (left), Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition Mr. John Young, (center-right), and Program Executive Officer for Ships (PEO Ships), Rear Admiral (RADM Charles Hamilton, (far-right), at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, District of...

US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral (ADM) Vern Clark...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral (ADM) Vern Clark, (center), answers questions from members of the Projecti... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    At a press conference in at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, NASA officials announced the names of the next-generation of rockets for future space exploration.  Seated at the dais are (left to right) Scott Horowitz, NASA associate administrator of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate; Jeff Hanley, manager of the Constellation Program at Johnson Space Center; and Steve Cook, manager of the Exploration Launch Office at Marshall Space Flight Center.  The crew launch vehicle will be called Ares I, and the cargo launch vehicle will be known as Ares V.  The name Ares is a pseudonym for Mars and appropriate for NASA's exploration mission.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd1410

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a press conference in at NASA's Ken...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a press conference in at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, NASA officials announced the names of the next-generation of rockets for future space exploration. Seated at the dais ar... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    At a press conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, NASA officials announced the names of the next-generation of rockets for future space exploration.  Seated (left to right) are Dolores Beasley, with NASA Public Affairs; Scott Horowitz, NASA associate administrator of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate; Jeff Hanley, manager of the Constellation Program at Johnson Space Center; and Steve Cook, manager of the Exploration Launch Office at Marshall Space Flight Center.  The crew launch vehicle will be called Ares I, and the cargo launch vehicle will be known as Ares V.  The name Ares is a pseudonym for Mars and appropriate for NASA's exploration mission.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd1409

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a press conference at NASA's Kenned...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a press conference at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, NASA officials announced the names of the next-generation of rockets for future space exploration. Seated (left to right) a... More

060803-F-0000X-010 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen answers questions from the media during the EA-18G Growler aircraft roll-out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). e EA-18 Growler is being developed to replace the fleet's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. e next-generation electronic attack aircraft for USN combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite. e EA-18G will feature an airborne electronic attack suite based on Northrop Grumman's Improved Capability III system, a radically new jamming and information warfare system....

060803-F-0000X-010 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operatio...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: 060803-F-0000X-010 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen answers questions from the... More

060803-F-0000X-003 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen (pictured on big screen background right), delivers remarks during the EA-18G Growler aircraft roll-out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The EA-18 Growler is being developed to replace the fleet's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The next-generation electronic attack aircraft for USN combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite. The EA-18G will feature an airborne electronic attack suite based on Northrop Grumman's Improved Capability III system, a radically new jamming and...

060803-F-0000X-003 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operatio...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: 060803-F-0000X-003 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen (pictured on big screen ba... More

060803-F-0000X-009 (Aug. 3, 2006)Chris Chadwick, Vice President and General Manager, Global Strike Systems, Boeing Company, addresses guests during the EA-18G Growler aircraft roll out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The aircraft is being developed to replace the US Navy's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy's next-generation electronic attack aircraft combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite.U.S. Air Force photo by Marv Lynchard (RELEASED)

060803-F-0000X-009 (Aug. 3, 2006)Chris Chadwick, Vice President and Ge...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Saint Louis State: Missouri (MO) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Marv Lynchard Release Status: Released to Public... More

060803-F-0000X-007 (Aug. 3, 2006)A crowd get a closer look of the EA-18G Growler aircraft during its roll out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The aircraft is being developed to replace the US Navy's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy's next-generation electronic attack aircraft combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite.U.S. Air Force photo by Marv Lynchard (RELEASED)

060803-F-0000X-007 (Aug. 3, 2006)A crowd get a closer look of the EA-1...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Saint Louis State: Missouri (MO) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Marv Lynchard Release Status: Released to Public... More

060803-F-0000X-017 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen (at the lectern), delivers remarks during the EA-18G Growler aircraft roll-out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The EA-18 Growler is being developed to replace the fleet's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The next-generation electronic attack aircraft for USN combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite. The EA-18G will feature an airborne electronic attack suite based on Northrop Grumman's Improved Capability III system, a radically new jamming and information warfare...

060803-F-0000X-017 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operatio...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: 060803-F-0000X-017 (Aug. 3, 2006)US Navy (USN) CHIEF of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Michael G. Mullen (at the lectern), delivers... More

060803-F-0000X-004 (Aug. 3, 2006)Guests get a closer look of the EA-18G Growler aircraft during its roll out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The aircraft is being developed to replace the US Navy's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy's next-generation electronic attack aircraft combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite.U.S. Air Force photo by Marv Lynchard (RELEASED)

060803-F-0000X-004 (Aug. 3, 2006)Guests get a closer look of the EA-18...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Saint Louis State: Missouri (MO) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Marv Lynchard Release Status: Released to Public... More

060803-F-0000X-001 (Aug. 3, 2006)Chris Chadwick, Vice President and General Manager, Global Strike Systems, Boeing Company, addresses guests during the EA-18G Growler aircraft roll out ceremony held at the Boeing Company in St. Louis, Missouri (MO). The aircraft is being developed to replace the US Navy's current carrier-based EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy's next-generation electronic attack aircraft combines the combat-proven F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft with a state-of-the-art electronic warfare avionics suite. The EA-18G will feature an airborne electronic attack suite based on Northrop Grumman's Improved Capability III system, a radically new jamming and information warfare...

060803-F-0000X-001 (Aug. 3, 2006)Chris Chadwick, Vice President and Ge...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: 060803-F-0000X-001 (Aug. 3, 2006)Chris Chadwick, Vice President and General Manager, Global Strike Systems, Boeing Company, addr... More

Next-Generation Aircraft, Pratt and Whitney Ultra-High Bypass Integration test at NASA Ames 11ft. wind tunnel (test 11-0182) assess the interaction effects of a scaled Pratt & Whitney geared turbofan on a Boeing 737-800 fuselage in an effort to use emerging technologies to make next-generation airliners quieter, more fuel efficient and lower on emissions.   (printed in Aviation Week & Space Technology April 8, 2011 issue) ARC-2008-ACD08-0108-001

Next-Generation Aircraft, Pratt and Whitney Ultra-High Bypass Integrat...

Next-Generation Aircraft, Pratt and Whitney Ultra-High Bypass Integration test at NASA Ames 11ft. wind tunnel (test 11-0182) assess the interaction effects of a scaled Pratt & Whitney geared turbofan on a Boein... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the STS-119 mission in February 2009. The specially modified tiles and instrumentation package will monitor the heating effects of early re-entry boundary layer transition at high mach numbers.  These data support analytical modeling and design efforts for both the space shuttles and NASA next-generation spacecraft, the Orion crew exploration vehicle. On the STS-119 mission, Discovery also will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. The truss includes the fourth pair of solar array wings and electronics that convert sunlight to power for the orbiting laboratory.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3291

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile is being affixed to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the STS-119 mission in February 2009.  The specially modified tiles and instrumentation package will monitor the heating effects of early re-entry boundary layer transition at high mach numbers.  These data support analytical modeling and design efforts for both the space shuttles and NASA next-generation spacecraft, the Orion crew exploration vehicle. On the STS-119 mission, Discovery also will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. The truss includes the fourth pair of solar array wings and electronics that convert sunlight to power for the orbiting laboratory.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3288

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile is being affixed to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on t... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the STS-119 mission in February 2009. The specially modified tiles and instrumentation package will monitor the heating effects of early re-entry boundary layer transition at high mach numbers.  These data support analytical modeling and design efforts for both the space shuttles and NASA next-generation spacecraft, the Orion crew exploration vehicle. On the STS-119 mission, Discovery also will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. The truss includes the fourth pair of solar array wings and electronics that convert sunlight to power for the orbiting laboratory.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3290

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -   In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on the STS-119 mission in February 2009. The specially modified tiles and instrumentation package will monitor the heating effects of early re-entry boundary layer transition at high mach numbers.  These data support analytical modeling and design efforts for both the space shuttles and NASA next-generation spacecraft, the Orion crew exploration vehicle. On the STS-119 mission, Discovery also will carry the S6 truss segment to complete the 361-foot-long backbone of the International Space Station. The truss includes the fourth pair of solar array wings and electronics that convert sunlight to power for the orbiting laboratory.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3289

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach boundary layer transition, or BLT, tile to space shuttle Discovery before its launch on th... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   The Ares I-X forward skirt is lifted from the transporter that delivered it to Astrotech in Titusville, Fla.  The forward skirt will be moved to a stand. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3655

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X forward skirt is lifted from the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X forward skirt is lifted from the transporter that delivered it to Astrotech in Titusville, Fla. The forward skirt will be moved to a stand. Major Tool is subcontractor to ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., begin removing an internal cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt.  The hardware was delivered from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3656

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., begin removing an internal cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt. The hardware was delivered from Major Tool &... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The Ares I-X forward skirt arrives at the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Fla., after its journey from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3652

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X forward skirt arrives at the Astr...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Ares I-X forward skirt arrives at the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Fla., after its journey from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., remove the protective outer shipping cover from the Ares I-X forward skirt after its arrival from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3653

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., remove the protective outer shipping cover from the Ares I-X forward skirt after its arrival from Major Tool & Machine ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt is revealed after its delivery from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3658

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt is revealed after its delivery from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contrac... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., remove an internal cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt.  The hardware was delivered from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana.  Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3657

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., remove an internal cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt. The hardware was delivered from Major Tool & Machine ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., attach an overhead crane to the Ares I-X forward skirt just arrived from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana.  The forward skirt will be lifted and moved to a stand. Major Tool is subcontractor to Ares I prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, in Utah. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will integrate and assemble the forward skirt components in the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida..  It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-08pd3654

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Alliant Techsystems Inc. workers at Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., attach an overhead crane to the Ares I-X forward skirt just arrived from Major Tool & Machine Inc. in Indiana. The for... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers place protective covers around the Ares I-X forward skirt.  The segment will be transferred to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1302

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers pl...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers place protective covers around the Ares I-X forward skirt. The segment will be transferred to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the padding is being removed from around the Ares I-X forward skirt.  It was transferred from the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Fla.  The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1308

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facili...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the padding is being removed from around the Ares I-X forward skirt. It was transfer... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward skirt arrives at the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1307

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward s...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward skirt arrives at the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The forward skirt is the initial... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt, wrapped in a protective cover, is lowered by crane onto a transporter. The segment will be transferred to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1304

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt, wrapped in a protective cover, is lowered by crane onto a transporter. The segment will be transferred to the Assembly and... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers begin removing the protective cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1310

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facilit...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers begin removing the protective cover from around the Ares I-X forward skirt. Th... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers place padding and cables over the Ares I-X forward skirt for its transfer to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1305

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers pl...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., workers place padding and cables over the Ares I-X forward skirt for its transfer to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kenned... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the pristine Ares I-X forward skirt is examined by workers after the protective cover was removed. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1311

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the pristine Ares I-X forward skirt is examined by workers after the protective cover w... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt, wrapped in a protective cover, is lifted by a crane for a move to a transporter.  The segment will be transferred to the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1303

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., the Ares I-X forward skirt, wrapped in a protective cover, is lifted by a crane for a move to a transporter. The segment will be transferred to the A... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift the padding away from the Ares I-X forward skirt transferred from the Astrotech facility in Titusville, Fla. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1309

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facilit...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift the padding away from the Ares I-X forward skirt transferred from the Ast... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward skirt is transported away from Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., heading for the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK,  will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations.  Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-1306

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward s...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Wrapped and strapped, the Ares I-X forward skirt is transported away from Astrotech in Titusville, Fla., heading for the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility, or ARF, at NASA's Kennedy ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lowered onto supports on the floor. United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK, will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1315

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facili...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lowered onto supports on the floor. United Space Alliance, under... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lifted off the transporter that carried it from the Astrotech facility.  The segment will be lifted off the transporter and placed on supports on the floor. United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK, will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1313

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facili...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lifted off the transporter that carried it from the Astrotech fa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach cables to the Ares I-X forward skirt, which was transported from the Astrotech facility.  The segment will be lifted off the transporter and placed on supports on the floor.  United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK, will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1312

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facili...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach cables to the Ares I-X forward skirt, which was transported from the Astrotech ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lowered onto supports on the floor.   United Space Alliance, under a subcontract to ATK, will complete the integration and assembly of the forward skirt components in the ARF. It will then be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 3 for stacking operations. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1314

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facilit...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X forward skirt is lowered onto supports on the floor. United Space Alliance, unde... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers install a parachute pack in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment.  The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2093

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers install a parachute pack in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment. The forward skirt is the ini... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack to the Ares I-X forward skirt segment, in which it will be installed. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2090

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack to the Ares I-X forward skirt segment, in which it will be installed. T... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers install a parachute pack in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2092

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers install a parachute pack in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment. The forward skirt is the init... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack for installation in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2089

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack for installation in the Ares I-X forward skirt segment. The forward ski... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack under the Ares I-X forward skirt segment, in which it will be installed. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the July 2009 test flight of the agency's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2091

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers move a parachute pack under the Ares I-X forward skirt segment, in which it will be installed... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers.  The catenary wire system under development for the Constellation Program’s next-generation vehicles will significantly increase the shielding level, providing better protection, and further separate the electrical current from vital launch hardware. The system will help avoid delays to the launch schedule by collecting more information on the strike for analysis by launch managers.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2254

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers. The catenary wire system under developmen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers.  The catenary wire system under development for the Constellation Program’s next-generation vehicles will significantly increase the shielding level, providing better protection, and further separate the electrical current from vital launch hardware. The system will help avoid delays to the launch schedule by collecting more information on the strike for analysis by launch managers.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2251

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers. The catenary wire system under developmen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers.  The catenary wire system under development for the Constellation Program’s next-generation vehicles will significantly increase the shielding level, providing better protection, and further separate the electrical current from vital launch hardware. The system will help avoid delays to the launch schedule by collecting more information on the strike for analysis by launch managers.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2252

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers. The catenary wire system under developmen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers.  The catenary wire system under development for the Constellation Program’s next-generation vehicles will significantly increase the shielding level, providing better protection, and further separate the electrical current from vital launch hardware. The system will help avoid delays to the launch schedule by collecting more information on the strike for analysis by launch managers.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2255

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers. The catenary wire system under developmen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers.  The catenary wire system under development for the Constellation Program’s next-generation vehicles will significantly increase the shielding level, providing better protection, and further separate the electrical current from vital launch hardware. The system will help avoid delays to the launch schedule by collecting more information on the strike for analysis by launch managers.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2253

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, catenary wires are being suspended from the lighting masts on the lightning towers. The catenary wire system under developmen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians examine the assembly of the Ares I-X forward skirt and the forward skirt extension. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the August 2009 test flight of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.   Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-3200

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians examine the assembly of the Ares I-X forward skirt and the forward skirt extension. The f... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians examine the assembly of the Ares I-X forward skirt and the forward skirt extension. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the August 2009 test flight of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.   Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-3201

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians examine the assembly of the Ares I-X forward skirt and the forward skirt extension. The f... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians closely watch the Ares I-X forward skirt as it is lowered toward the forward skirt extension for mating. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the August 2009 test flight of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.   Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-3198

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians closely watch the Ares I-X forward skirt as it is lowered toward the forward skirt extens... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians keep watch as a crane lowers the Ares I-X forward skirt toward the forward skirt extension for mating. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the August 2009 test flight of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.   Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-3197

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians keep watch as a crane lowers the Ares I-X forward skirt toward the forward skirt extensio... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians look closely as the Ares I-X forward skirt is mated to the forward skirt extension.. The forward skirt is the initial piece of first-stage hardware in preparation for the August 2009 test flight of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and launch vehicle system. Built entirely of armored steel, the 14,000-pound segment is seven feet tall and 12-1/4 feet wide.   Photo credit: NASA/Tim Jacobs KSC-2009-3199

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians look closely as the Ares I-X forward skirt is mated to the forward skirt extension.. The ... More

The Next Generation of Infrared Views

The Next Generation of Infrared Views

The image on the left shows an infrared view of the center of our Milky Way galaxy as seen by the 1983 Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which surveyed the whole sky with only 62 pixels. The image on the right s... More

The Next Generation

The Next Generation

A park ranger helps young visitors identify native plant species.

The Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition, PS-PVD, Rig, Coatings for Next-Generation Turbine Components, Creating Efficient Engines GRC-2015-C-00241

The Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition, PS-PVD, Rig, Coatings for ...

The Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition, PS-PVD, Rig, Coatings for Next-Generation Turbine Components, Creating Efficient Engines

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2395

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2396

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2011-2413

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2011-2420

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2011-2415

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2399

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2011-2418

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2392

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2400

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2398

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2397

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2011-2417

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's right-hand inner heat shield from engine No. 1. The removal is part of Di... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.                Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2425

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is atop a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.      Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2432

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction cont...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is atop a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space C... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.        Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2429

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction cont...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Spa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.              Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2426

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.      Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2430

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction cont...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Spa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.          Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2428

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction cont...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is moved to a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Spa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.                  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2424

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida begin to remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.                      Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2422

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA'...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida begin to remove space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the s... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is atop a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To maneuver, the FRCS used hypergolic fuel and oxidizer, which were purged from Discovery after its final spaceflight, STS-133. Next, the FRCS will be shipped to a maintenance facility at White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, where additional inspections will be performed and its components made safe to go on public display. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display.    Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2433

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction cont...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle Discovery's forward reaction control system (FRCS), which helped steer the shuttle in orbit, is atop a transporter in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space C... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians guide the specialized engine installer into place so it can be connected to a main engine on space shuttle Discovery and remove it safely. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2539

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians guide the specialized engine insta...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians guide the specialized engine installer into place so it can be connected to a main engine on space shuttle Discovery and remove it safely. The work is taking place in Orbiter... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A heavy forklift with its specialized engine installer carries one of the main engines taken from space shuttle Discovery into the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2544

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A heavy forklift with its specialized engine i...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A heavy forklift with its specialized engine installer carries one of the main engines taken from space shuttle Discovery into the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The specialized engine installer is moved near space shuttle Discovery as technicians prepare to remove the three main engines from the orbiter. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2538

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The specialized engine installer is moved near...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The specialized engine installer is moved near space shuttle Discovery as technicians prepare to remove the three main engines from the orbiter. The work is taking place in Orbiter Proce... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians complete the removal of one of space shuttle Discovery's three main engines. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The transition and retirement processing is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for display. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2542

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians complete the removal of one of spa...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians complete the removal of one of space shuttle Discovery's three main engines. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Flori... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians complete the removal of main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.        NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2601

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians complete the removal of main engine...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians complete the removal of main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbit... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This 3-D image was taken in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after crews installed the final tire on space shuttle Discovery. This is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2738

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This 3-D image was taken in Orbiter Processing...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This 3-D image was taken in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after crews installed the final tire on space shuttle Discovery. This is part of the ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida using a Hyster forklift to lower one of space shuttle Discovery's main engines after removal for cleaning and inspection. This  is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2736

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of crews in Orbiter Proces...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida using a Hyster forklift to lower one of space shuttle Discovery's main engines aft... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A panoramic photo shows space shuttle Discovery during the main engine removal phase in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.        NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2614

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A panoramic photo shows space shuttle Discovery...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A panoramic photo shows space shuttle Discovery during the main engine removal phase in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Dis... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.  NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2599

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbiter Proc... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.          NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-2600

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Technicians carefully remove main engine No. 3 from space shuttle Discovery using a specially designed engine installer, called a Hyster forklift. The work is taking place in Orbiter Proc... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this 3-D image shows space shuttle Discovery's main engines before removeal for cleaning and inspection. The work is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2737

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Ken...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this 3-D image shows space shuttle Discovery's main engines before removeal for cleaning and inspection. The w... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Main engine No. 1, which was removed from space shuttle Discovery, is transported from Orbiter Processing Facility-2 to the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal was part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display.    Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2679

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Main engine No. 1, which was removed from space...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Main engine No. 1, which was removed from space shuttle Discovery, is transported from Orbiter Processing Facility-2 to the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle main engine No. 2, which was removed from shuttle Discovery, will undergo standard inspections in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal was part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2011-2710

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle main engine No. 2, which was remo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle main engine No. 2, which was removed from shuttle Discovery, will undergo standard inspections in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space C... More

Previous

of 9

Next