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14th New Jersey Monument Restortation: In Progress

14th New Jersey Monument Restortation: In Progress

14th New Jersey Monument Restoration: In Progress

19th Century Drawing of Thomas Farm

19th Century Drawing of Thomas Farm

Thomas Farm. The Thomas Farm property was also known as "Araby." The main brick house was probably built between 1770-1780.

Boundary of Araby Property

Boundary of Araby Property

Worthington Farm. Beginning in 1812, John McPherson, Jr. and his father, Colonel John McPherson, purchased and assembled adjacent tracts of land to create an approximately 1,111-acre tract that he called Araby.... More

B&O Railroad Bridge Sketch, ca. 1896

B&O Railroad Bridge Sketch, ca. 1896

Monocacy National Battlefield. The wooden railroad bridge across the Monocacy River was replaced by an iron bridge in the mid-1850s. The Union army placed their 24-pound howitzer to "defend the two bridges and ... More

Burn the Bridge!

Burn the Bridge!

The Union force burned the covered bridge to prevent the Confederates from capturing it.

Location Map of Monocacy National Battlefield

Location Map of Monocacy National Battlefield

Monocacy National Battlefield. The landscape boundary uses the current park boundary. It is defined primarily by the historic boundaries of the farm and mill properties that were in existence at the time of the... More

Monocacy Junction, ca. 1872

Monocacy Junction, ca. 1872

Monocacy National Battlefield. This Monocacy Junction station building replaced the one that burned in 1864. Until 1873, all trains from the west heading to Baltimore or Washington, D.C. went via the Monocacy J... More

Thomas Farm Engraving, 1882

Thomas Farm Engraving, 1882

Thomas Farm Engraving, 1882

Thomas House, 1888

Thomas House, 1888

"Home of Col. C.K. Thomas, Monocacy, MD, April 30 - 1888"

Araby Mill, ca. 1893

Araby Mill, ca. 1893

Monocacy National Battlefield. Between 1830 and 1835, John McPherson Jr. established a mill on this property. It was built at the same time as the B&O Railroad, probably to take advantage of the site's proximit... More

Worthington Farm

Worthington Farm

Worthington Farm, early 20th century image with main house at center surounded by barns and outbuildings.

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Georgetown Pike, ca. 1900

Georgetown Pike, ca. 1900

Monocacy National Battlefield. The Georgetown Pike, circa 1900. This road was the primary north-south highway between Fredrick County and Washington, D.C. Note the stone walls lining the road. Many of these wal... More

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Gambrill Mansion, 1900s

Tenant Farmer at Worthington Farm, 1905 - 1953

Tenant Farmer at Worthington Farm, 1905 - 1953

Three generations of the same family tenant farmed at Worthington Farm from 1905 - 1953

Gambrill Mill ca. 1915

Gambrill Mill ca. 1915

Gambrill Mill ca. 1915

Worthington Farm Landscape at Monocacy

Worthington Farm Landscape at Monocacy

Worthington Farm. The entry lane leads to the main house of Worthington Farm. This view, looking west, captures the agricultural fields, forest edges, and circulation systems beyond the house. The house is the ... More

National parks: AF_600201_2 - public domain image
Site Plan Detail of Worthington Farm

Site Plan Detail of Worthington Farm

Worthington Farm. A site plan from the 2013 Cultural Landscape Inventory report shows features of the cultural landscape, including circulation, vegetation, topography, structures, and views.

Buildings at Worthington Farm

Buildings at Worthington Farm

Worthington Farm. The main house is the only remaining building that existed at the time of the Civil War. During the historic period, buildings were a defining characteristic of the property, and a mid-1800s a... More

National parks: AL_600201_3 - public domain image
Map of Component Landscapes of Monocacy

Map of Component Landscapes of Monocacy

Monocacy National Battlefield. The parent cultural landscape contains four component landscapes, defined by individual histories, characteristics, and conditions and contributing to the significance or the park... More

National parks: AE_600201_2 - public domain image
Baker Farm Building Cluster

Baker Farm Building Cluster

Monocacy National Battlefield. Farmstead clusters on the battlefield property had been determined by site topography and the course of the river. The clusters marked the central core of the farms. Today, only ... More

Hermitage Building Cluster

Hermitage Building Cluster

Monocacy National Battlefield. The cluster arrangement that can still be seen at a few farmsteads within the battlefield was a defining characteristic of the historic landscape. The cluster at Hermitage is the ... More

14th New Jersey Monument: 1916

14th New Jersey Monument: 1916

14th New Jersey Monument: 1916

National parks: AB_600201_3 - public domain image
Worthington House, National Parks gallery

Worthington House, National Parks gallery

Worthington Farm. The main house was built between 1847 and 1852. When the NPS purchased the property in 1982, the Worthington House was in poor condition, as seen in the top image. The main house was stabilize... More

National parks: AP_600201_1 - public domain image
Worthington Farm and Monocacy Location Map

Worthington Farm and Monocacy Location Map

Worthington Farm. Monocacy Battlefield is comprised of six properties: the Baker, Best, Lewis, Thomas, and Worthington Farms, as well as the Gambrill Mill tract. The agricultural landscape served as the stage f... More

National parks: AC_600201_2 - public domain image
Agricultural Landscape at Monocacy

Agricultural Landscape at Monocacy

Monocacy National Battlefield. The agricultural character of the landscape today reflects its historic appearance at the time of the Civil War Battle of Monocacy.

Landscape Site Plan.

Landscape Site Plan.

Worthington Farm. The National Park Service purchased 280 acres of the Worthington property in 1982. Although the farm has lost some of the features that existed during the Civil War battle, the landscape retai... More

National parks: AP_600201_2 - public domain image
National parks: AE_600201_1 - public domain image
Site Plan of the Monocacy National Battlefield Properties

Site Plan of the Monocacy National Battlefield Properties

Monocacy National Battlefield. The battlefield landscape is comprised of several properties, largely defined by the agricultural character and use that existed prior to the Civil War. This map shows: a) Hermit... More

Baker Farm seen from Hill Farm at Monocacy

Baker Farm seen from Hill Farm at Monocacy

Monocacy National Battlefield. Panoramic views of the battlefield and scenery of the valley are possible from several areas of the battlefield landscape, including the Hill Farm.

National parks: AB_600201_1 - public domain image
Osage Orange Stand

Osage Orange Stand

Worthington Farm. Osage orange trees line the sunken road. These may mark areas that were used for grazing, as corrals, or areas that needed protection from livestock. These were commonly used as hedging during... More

National parks: AB_600201_2 - public domain image
Thomas House, 1931

Thomas House, 1931

Thomas House, 1931, by Fred Cross

View from Araby Farm, ca. 1934

View from Araby Farm, ca. 1934

Monocacy National Battlefield. View from Araby farm fields looking west, ca. 1934. Between 1812 and 1832, John McPherson and his son assembled various portions of tracts to create a 1,111-acre property that cam... More

View from Araby Mill, ca. 1934

View from Araby Mill, ca. 1934

Monocacy National Battlefield. View northwest from Araby Mill, circa 1934. The water towers of the railroad junction can be seen in the middle left distance and the turnpike bridge and turnpike beyond can be se... More

Tenant Farmer and Horse, ca. 1935

Tenant Farmer and Horse, ca. 1935

A tenant farmer and his horse, ca. 1935. There was no central heat or indoor plumbing except for one pipe to bring water into the kitchen from the cistern (seen in photo to right of farmer's back).

Thomas House, 1949

Thomas House, 1949

Thomas House, 1949

Thomas Farm Cluster

Thomas Farm Cluster

The spatial organization of this cultural landscape has been only minimally altered since the late 1800s, and the arrangement of the Thomas Farm today continues to reflect that period of significance. The bank ... More

Panorama of Mill Pond

Panorama of Mill Pond

The impact on the landscape of both agriculture and the related milling operations would have been extensive, with open fields, mills and buildings, roads, and constructed water features. A historic mill pond w... More

Garden Lot Panorama

Garden Lot Panorama

Oral tradition suggests that there was a large vegetable garden on the south side of the house in the 1960s or 1970s. Such a garden probably existed in that location for a longer period of time, for a vegetable... More

Journey Through Hallowed Ground Byway - Monocacy National Battlefield Sign

Journey Through Hallowed Ground Byway - Monocacy National Battlefield ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Original Caption: A new visitors center at the Monocacy National Battlefield stands across the grassy field behind a stone support holding a sign marking ... More

Monocacy National Battlefield, Maryland

Monocacy National Battlefield, Maryland

Title from panel. Includes text, descriptive index to points of interest, location map, and col. ill. Text, map of "Early's Washington raid June-July 1864", aerial view of 1864 battlefield drawn by "NPS/Richard... More

Prepping the Site

Prepping the Site

Three preservationists prep the site for the placement of the second step.

Installing the Second Step

Installing the Second Step

Preservationist check the alignment of the second step and prepare the site to receive the third and final granite step.

Installing The Second Step

Installing The Second Step

NPS preservationists inspect the alignment of the second granite step.

Preparation is Key

Preparation is Key

Stone dust is used to backfill behind the first step and provide a foundation for the second step.

Moving on Up

Moving on Up

Sometimes a situation calls for strength, not subtlety.

Scraping Away the past

Scraping Away the past

Workers dug down to the original foundation of the granite steps to the 10th Vermont Monument.

A Little More to the...

A Little More to the...

Getting the granite steps properly aligned and reset takes a team.

Replanting the grass

Replanting the grass

Preservationists restored the slope and soil around the steps and planted it with grass to stabilize it.

On the Level

On the Level

Preservationists check their work throughout the process to ensure a good result.

10th Vermont Monument After Preservation work (2)

10th Vermont Monument After Preservation work (2)

In the fall of 2008, preservation specialists repaired the granite steps leading to the 10th Vermont Monument.

Measure Twice..., National Parks gallery

Measure Twice..., National Parks gallery

Correct alignment is a critical step in resetting the granite steps at the 10th Vermont Monument.

Easy does it

Easy does it

Final alignment of the granite steps must be done by hand.

Steps? Here?, National Parks gallery

Steps? Here?, National Parks gallery

Dirt patches in the hillside in front of the 10th Vermont Monument show where the granite steps were.

Prepping for the Next Step

Prepping for the Next Step

Stone dust is compressed behind the first step to provide a solid bed for the second granite step.

Getting it Just right

Getting it Just right

Sometimes it takes some old fashioned elbow grease to get it just right.

10th Vermont Monument Stairs Before Repairs

10th Vermont Monument Stairs Before Repairs

After almost 100 years in place, the granite stairs to the 10th Vermont Monument had shifted and become a potential hazard.

Prepping for the first step

Prepping for the first step

A solid foundation will help keep the steps level for years to come.

Washing the Monument

Washing the Monument

Preservationists clean the granite of the 10th Vermont Monument.

Smoothing the Stone

Smoothing the Stone

A smooth and level bed is critical to producing level steps.

Hidden Foundation, National Parks gallery

Hidden Foundation, National Parks gallery

The original foundation for the granite steps are hidden by almost a 100 years of intrusion by dirt.

Tools of the Trade

Tools of the Trade

While preservationists prepped the site, the granite blocks were stored off site.

Digging out the old foundations

Digging out the old foundations

Workers cleared almost 100 years of mud and silt from the stone foundation for the steps to the 10th Vermont Monument.

Prepping the site

Prepping the site

Stone dust provides a durable foundation for the granite steps.

Finishing touches, National Parks gallery

Finishing touches, National Parks gallery

Preservation work included restoring the slope of the hill next to the steps as well as replanting.

Removing the Steps

Removing the Steps

A bucket loader is used to lift the granite steps from the slope in front of the monument.

Pushing and Prying

Pushing and Prying

Final alignment of the granite steps is done manually.

Repairing the grade

Repairing the grade

In addition to resetting the granite steps, preservationists restored the slope around the steps and replanted grass.

Set it Down

Set it Down

While a forklift is handy for the large movements, most of the work must be done by hand.

Digging out the foundations

Digging out the foundations

In order to level the granite steps to the 10th Vermont Monument, preservationist had to dig down to the original foundations and remove excess dirt.

Preservationists Admiring their Work

Preservationists Admiring their Work

NPS preservation specialists admire the results of their hard work.

Almost done Resetting the Steps

Almost done Resetting the Steps

Preservation specialists repaired the granite steps to the 10th Vermont Monument

The Fun Begins

The Fun Begins

Once a fork lift has deposited the granite block in place, preservationists must manually align the blocks

Adjusting the Steps

Adjusting the Steps

Final alignment of the granite steps is done manually.

Moving into Place

Moving into Place

A forklift helps position a granite block near it's final resting place.

Easy Does it

Easy Does it

Preservationists move a granite step into place.

The steps arrive

The steps arrive

While site work was completed, the granite steps were stored on a truck bed.

Admiring their Work (2)

Admiring their Work (2)

Four NPS preservation specialists pose with the 10th Vermont Monument and its newly reset steps.

Checking the First Step

Checking the First Step

A preservationist tests whether the first granite step is seated properly on the foundation.

Check it Out!

Check it Out!

Each step must be level and perfectly aligned before the next step can be placed.

Setting it down

Setting it down

A forklift is used to move the second step.

10th Vermont Monument After Preservation Work

10th Vermont Monument After Preservation Work

In the fall of 2008, preservation specialists repaired the stone steps leading to the monument.

It takes a team

It takes a team

Preservation specialists work together to reset the granite steps.

Away we go!

Away we go!

The second step is removed from the site.

The Second Step

The Second Step

Preservationists carefully move the second step into place.

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/03/24)

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/03/24)

Ground is broken for the new Monocacy National Battlefield visitor center. (March 24, 2006)

Confederate Major General John B. Gordon

Confederate Major General John B. Gordon

Confederate Major General John B. Gordon commanding a division under Major General John C. Breckinridge at the battle of Monocacy

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/06/30)

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/06/30)

Monocacy National Battlefield visitor center construction progresses on building foundations. (June 30, 2006)

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/08/23)

Visitor Center Construction, (2006/08/23)

Monocacy National Battlefield visitor center construction progresses as framing continues and observation deck structure (left) is added (August 23, 2006)

Thomas Farm Window and Door Repairs

Thomas Farm Window and Door Repairs

Thomas Farm Window and Door Repairs

B. Supplemental framing

B. Supplemental framing

2) Supplemental framing is added to stabilize log section of the Main House

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