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Topic: methane

1937
1937
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2016
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Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (1938)

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (19...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 30: Mineral Resources, Chapter I: Bureau Of Mines, Department Of The Interior, Part 22: Portable Methane Detectors, Revised 1938

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (1943)

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (19...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 30: Mineral Resources, Chapter I: Bureau Of Mines, Department Of The Interior, Part 22: Portable Methane Detectors, Revised 1943

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (1958)

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (19...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 30: Mineral Resources, Chapter I: Bureau Of Mines, Department Of The Interior, Part 22: Portable Methane Detectors, Revised 1958

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (1959)

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (19...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 30: Mineral Resources, Chapter I: Bureau Of Mines, Department Of The Interior, Part 22: Portable Methane Detectors, Revised 1959

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (1964)

Code of Federal Regulations: Portable Methane Detectors, 30 C.F.R. (19...

Description: Code of Federal Regulations, Title 30: Mineral Resources, Chapter I: Bureau Of Mines, Department Of The Interior, Part 22: Portable Methane Detectors, Revised 1964

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, 15 U.S.C. §§ 3801-3810 (Suppl. 5 1976)

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and ...

Description: U.S. Code 1976 Edition, Supplement 5, Title 15: Commerce and Trade, Chapter 64: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, Sections 3801-3810

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, 15 U.S.C. §§ 3801-3810 (Suppl. 4 1976)

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and ...

Description: U.S. Code 1976 Edition, Supplement 4, Title 15: Commerce and Trade, Chapter 64: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, Sections 3801-3810

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, 15 U.S.C. §§ 3801-3810 (1982)

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and ...

Description: U.S. Code 1982 Edition, Title 15: Commerce and Trade, Chapter 64: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, Sections 3801-3810

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two images pictures of Uranus, one in true color and the other in false color, were shot by Voyager 2's  narrow angle camera. The picture at left has been processed  to show Uranus as the human eye would see from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The image is a composite of shots taken through blue, green, and orange filters. The darker shadings on the upper right of the disk correspond to day-night boundaries on the planet. Beyond this boundary lies the hidden northern hemisphere of Uranus, which currently remains in total darkness as the planet rotates. The blue-green color results from the aborption of red light  by methane gas  in Uranus' deep, cold, and remarkably clear atmosphere. The picture at right uses false color and extreme contrast to bring out subtle details in the polar region of Uranus. Images obtained through ultraviolet, violet, and orange filters were respectively converted to the same  blue, green, and red colors used to produce the picture at left. The very slight contrasts visible in true color are greatly exaggerated here. In this false colr picture, Uranus reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by aseries of progressively lighter concentric bands. One possible explanation is that a brownish haze or smog, concentrated around the pole, is arranged into bands of zonal motions of the upper atmosphere. Several artifacts of the optics and processing are visible. The occasional donut shapes are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics;the processing needed to bring ot faint features also bring out camera blemishes. in addition, the bright pink strip at the lower edge of the planets limb is an artifact of the image enhancement. In fact, the limb is dark and uniform in color around the planet. ARC-1986-AC86-7009

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two image...

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two images pictures of Uranus, one in true color and the other in false color, were shot by Voyager 2's narrow angle camera. The picture at left has... more

Range : 2.7 million miles (1.7 million miles) P-29497C Tis Voyager 2, false color composite of Uranus demonstrates the usefulness of special filters in the Voyager cameras for revealing the presence of high altitude hazes in Uranus' atmosphere. The picture is a composite of images obtained through the single orange and two methane filters of Voyager's wide angle camera. Orange, short wavelength and long wavelength methane images are displayed, retrospectively, as blue, green, and orange. The pink area centered on the pole is due to the presence of hazes high in the atmosphere that reflect the light before it has traversed a long enough path through the atmosphere to suffer absorbtion by methane gas. The bluest region at mid-latitude represent the most haze free regions on Uranus, thus, deeper cloud levels can be detected in these areas. ARC-1986-AC86-7014

Range : 2.7 million miles (1.7 million miles) P-29497C Tis Voyager 2, ...

Range : 2.7 million miles (1.7 million miles) P-29497C Tis Voyager 2, false color composite of Uranus demonstrates the usefulness of special filters in the Voyager cameras for revealing the presence of high alt... more

Range :  1 illion km. ( 600,000 mi. ) Resolution :  140 km. ( 90 mi. ) P-29539C This Voyager 2 image of Uranus was captured as the spacecraft was leaving Uranus behind on its cruise to Neptune. The image is a color composite of three photographs taken through blue, grren, and orange filters. Thin thin crecent seen here is at an angle of 153 degrees between the the spacecraft, the planet, and the sun. Even at this extreme angle, uranus retains the pale blue-green color seen  by the ground based astronomers and recorded by Voyager 2 during its historic encounter, this color results from the presence of methane in Uranus' atmosphere. The gas absorbs red wavelengths of light, leaving the predominant hue seen here. The tendency for the cresent to become white at the extreme edge is cased by the presence of a high-altitude haze. Voyager 2, having encountered Jupiter in 1979, Saturn in 1981, and Uranus in 1986, will proceed on its jouney to Neptune. Closest approach is scheduled for August 24, 1989. ARC-1986-AC86-7042

Range : 1 illion km. ( 600,000 mi. ) Resolution : 140 km. ( 90 mi. )...

Range : 1 illion km. ( 600,000 mi. ) Resolution : 140 km. ( 90 mi. ) P-29539C This Voyager 2 image of Uranus was captured as the spacecraft was leaving Uranus behind on its cruise to Neptune. The image is a c... more

Range :  74 million km. ( 46 million miles ) P-29313CThis Voyager photograph of Uranus is a composite of for images taken by the narrow angle camera. At this range, clouds and other features in the atmosphere as small as 1,370 km. could be detected by Voyager 2. Yet, no such features are visible.  This view is toward the illuminated south pole of Uranus. The predominant blue color is the result of atmospheric methane, which absorbs the red wavelengths  from incoming sunlight. The spot at the upper left edge of the planet's disk reulted from the removal of a reseau mark used in making measurments on the photograph. Three of Uranus' five known satellites are visible; Miranda ( at far right, closest to the planet ), Ariel ( next out , at top), and Umbriel ( lower left ). Titania and Oberon are now outside the narrow angle camera's field of view when it centered on the planet. This color composite was made from images taken through blue, green, orange, and clear filters. ARC-1986-AC86-7000

Range : 74 million km. ( 46 million miles ) P-29313CThis Voyager phot...

Range : 74 million km. ( 46 million miles ) P-29313CThis Voyager photograph of Uranus is a composite of for images taken by the narrow angle camera. At this range, clouds and other features in the atmosphere a... more

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, 15 U.S.C. §§ 3801-3810 (1988)

United States Code: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and ...

Description: U.S. Code 1988 Edition, Title 15: Commerce and Trade, Chapter 64: Methane Transportation Research, Development, and Demonstration, Sections 3801-3810

Range :  5.4 million km (3.3 million miles) Features as small as 100 km (62 miles) across can be seen in this color image of Neptune's satellite Triton, photographed by Voyager 2.  Triton's overall pinkish color may be due to reddish materials produced by irradiation of methane gas and ice on the satellite.  The dark areas near the top of the image seem to be part of a belt of dark markings observed near Trition's equator at different longitudes.  Generally, darker areas on Triton appear to be somewhat redder in color than brighter areas.  The central longitude in the image is 123 degrees.  Here the south pole is at about   6 o'clock, approximately 1/6th of the way up from the bottom.  The color image was made from three black-and-white frames, taken through clear, violet and green filters. ARC-1989-AC89-7011

Range : 5.4 million km (3.3 million miles) Features as small as 100 k...

Range : 5.4 million km (3.3 million miles) Features as small as 100 km (62 miles) across can be seen in this color image of Neptune's satellite Triton, photographed by Voyager 2. Triton's overall pinkish colo... more

The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipation over periods of several to tens of hours.  In this sequence spanning two rotations of Neptune (about 36 hours) Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS) at an effective resolution of about 100 km (62 miles) per pixel.  The surprisingly rapid changes which occur over the 18 hours separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth.  However, the scale is immense by our standards--the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degree Kelvin  (-360F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystalse of water ice. ARC-1989-A89-7007

The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming...

The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipation over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence spanning two rotations of Neptune (about 36 hours) Voyager 2 ob... more

Range :  16 million km (9.9 million miles)  P-34616 This series of six Voyager 2 images of Neptune through different filters reveals altitude in Neptune's clouds. The top three images, taken though orange, violet, and ultraviolet filters by the narrow-angle camera, show several bright cloud features, clearly visible in each image. The 'scooter' cloud, at 42 degrees south latitude, although prominent in the orange image, is invisible in ultraviolet, where scattering by atmospheric molecules is strongest. The disappearance can be understood if the 'scooter cloud has more obscurring atmosphere above it ( i.e. the scooter cloud is lower ) than other bright clouds. The observation also suggest that the centrally located Great Dark Spot is also a low lying feature because it also loses visiblity in the ultraviolet image. The lower three wide angle images ( from left to right: orange, weak methane [541nm], and strong methane [619nm] are arranged in increasing absorption by methane in Neptune's atmosphere. In the lower images the 'scooter cloud' becomes less obvious from left to right, implying there is relatively more absorbing methane above the 'scooter cloud'. Thus the set of images also implies that the 'scooter cloud' is deeper in the atmosphere ( and therefore at higher atmospheric pressure ) than the other bright clouds. ARC-1989-AC89-7003

Range : 16 million km (9.9 million miles) P-34616 This series of six...

Range : 16 million km (9.9 million miles) P-34616 This series of six Voyager 2 images of Neptune through different filters reveals altitude in Neptune's clouds. The top three images, taken though orange, viol... more

P-34615 These three color images of Triton were taken at three different orbital longitudes to show different faces of the neptune moon. the overall pinkish cast of the images may be due to the presence  of reddish material on Triton produced by irradiation of methane gas and ice on Triton. In these pictures the south pole  is at roughly 6 o'clock, about 1/6th of the way from the bottom. Near the top of the left  on Triton's equator are several large dark spots that are probably suface markings. These markings rotate with a 5.88-day orbital period of Triton. The left image has a central longitude 288 degrees, the center at 351 degrees ( nearly the hemisphere that will be seen at Voyager's closest approach to Triton), and the right image is at 35 degrees logitude. ARC-1989-AC89-7002

P-34615 These three color images of Triton were taken at three differe...

P-34615 These three color images of Triton were taken at three different orbital longitudes to show different faces of the neptune moon. the overall pinkish cast of the images may be due to the presence of red... more

P-34665 This false color Voyager 2 image of Neptune's satellite Triton, is a composite of three images taken through ultraviolet, green, and viloet filters. The smallest resolvable features are about 47 km., or 29 miles accross. Mottling in the bright southern hemisphere may be the result of topography, if Triton's crust is predominently water ice, which is rigid at Triton's surface temperature. Alternatively, the mottling could be due to markings on a smooth surface, if the crust is composed of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, or methane ice, since they are soft at the same temperature. ARC-1989-AC89-7018

P-34665 This false color Voyager 2 image of Neptune's satellite Triton...

P-34665 This false color Voyager 2 image of Neptune's satellite Triton, is a composite of three images taken through ultraviolet, green, and viloet filters. The smallest resolvable features are about 47 km., or... more

P-34666 This false color photograph of Neptune was reconstructed from two images taken by Voyager 2's wide angle camera, through the orange and two different methane filters. Objects that deep in the atmosphere are blue, while those at higher altitudes are white. Light at methane wavelengths is mostly absorbed in the deeper atmosphere. The bright, white feature is a high altitude cloud just south of the Great dark Spot. The hard, sharp inner boundary within the bright cloud is an artifact of computer processing on Earth. Other, smaller clouds associated with the Great Dark Spot are white or pink, and are also at high altitudes. Neptune's limb looks reddish because Voyager 2 is viewing it tangentially, and the sunlight is scattered back to space before it can be absorbed by methane. A long, narrow band of high-altitude clouds near the top of the image is located at 25 degrees north latitude, and faint hazes mark the equator and polor regions ARC-1989-AC89-7019

P-34666 This false color photograph of Neptune was reconstructed from ...

P-34666 This false color photograph of Neptune was reconstructed from two images taken by Voyager 2's wide angle camera, through the orange and two different methane filters. Objects that deep in the atmosphere... more

Range :  4 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-34654 This Voyager 2 image of Neptune's satteltite Triton was made by combining images taken through the green, clear, and violet filters. The smallest feature seen are about 74 km, or 46 miles accross. The south pole of Triton is currently tipped toward the sun and it is summer in the southern hemisphere. The south pole is located about a quarter of the way up from the bottom if the image. The bright band near the top of the image nearly coincides with the equator of Triton. One prominent and several smaller bright, wispy streaks extend from the band into the darker northern hemisphere. The prominent wispy streak shows bluish-white color, while the darker northern hemisphere is reddish in color. This may indicate that the streak is freshly deposited frost while the red color in the northern hemisphere may result from methane frost that has been darkened by radiation. Individual markings appear to rotate with the satellite and retain their shapes indicating they are indeed surface features and not in the tenuous atmosphere. ARC-1989-AC89-7016

Range : 4 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-34654 This Voyager 2 im...

Range : 4 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-34654 This Voyager 2 image of Neptune's satteltite Triton was made by combining images taken through the green, clear, and violet filters. The smallest feature see... more

Range :  190,000 km ( 118,000 mi.) This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters.  The smallest visible features are about 4 km (2.5 mi.) across.  The image shows a geologic boundary between completely dark materials and patchy light/dark materials.  A layer of pinkish material stretches across the center of the image.  The pinkish layer must be thin because underlying albedo patterns show through.  Several features appear to be affected by the thin atmosphere; the elongated dark streaks may represent particulate materials blown in the same direction by previaling winds, and the white material may be frost deposits.  Other features appear to be volcanic deposits including the smooth, dark materials alongside the long, narrow canyons.  The streaks themselves appear to originate from very small circular sources, some of which are white, like the source of the prominent streak near the center of the image.  The sources may be small volcanic vents with fumarolic-like activity.  The colors may be due to irradiated methane, which is pink to red, and nitrogen, which is white. ARC-1989-AC89-7053

Range : 190,000 km ( 118,000 mi.) This false color image of Triton is...

Range : 190,000 km ( 118,000 mi.) This false color image of Triton is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and ultraviolet filters. The smallest visible features are about 4 km (2.5 mi.) acro... more

P-34718 Range: 210,000 kilometers (128,000 miles) This natural color image of the limb of Triton shows the largest surface features at about 3 miles across. The picture is a composite of images taken through the violet, green and clear filters and shows a geologic boundary between a rough, pitted surface to the right and a smoother surface to the left. The change between surface types is gradual. The image also shows a color boundary between pinkish material in the upper part of the image and whiter material in the lower part. The geologic and color boundaries are not the same. That implies that whatever supplies the color is a very thin coating over a different underlying material in which the geologic boundary occurs. The colored coating may be a seasonal frost composed of compounds volatile enough to be sublimated at the very low temperatures (40 K to 50 K or -387.4 F to -369.4 F) prevailing near Triton's surface. Possible compositions of the frost layer include methane (which turns red when irradiated), carbon monoxide or nitrogen. The color in this image is somewhat exaggerated: Triton is primarily a white object with a pinkish cast in some areas. ARC-1989-AC89-7052

P-34718 Range: 210,000 kilometers (128,000 miles) This natural color i...

P-34718 Range: 210,000 kilometers (128,000 miles) This natural color image of the limb of Triton shows the largest surface features at about 3 miles across. The picture is a composite of images taken through th... more

P-34764 Voyager 2 obtained this high resolution color image of Neptune's large satellite Triton  during its close flyby. Approximately a dozen individual images were combined to produce this comprehensive view of  the Neptune-facing hemisphere of Triton. Fine detail is provided by high resolution, clear-filter images, with color information added from lower resolution frames. The large south polar cap at the bottom of the image is highly refective and slightly pink in color , and may consist of a slowly evaporating layer of nitrogen ice deposited during the previous winter. From the ragged edge of the polar cap northward the satellite's face is generously darker and redder in color. This coloring may be produced by the action of ultraviolet light and magnetospheric radiation upon methane in the atmosphere and surface. Running across this darker region , approximately parallel to the edge of the polar cap, is a band of brighter white material that is almost bluish in color. The underlying topography in this bright band is similiar, however to that in the darker, redder regions surrounding it. ARC-1989-AC89-7046

P-34764 Voyager 2 obtained this high resolution color image of Neptune...

P-34764 Voyager 2 obtained this high resolution color image of Neptune's large satellite Triton during its close flyby. Approximately a dozen individual images were combined to produce this comprehensive view ... more

Range :  168,694 km (105,000 mi.) Voyager 2 discovered detached limb hazes in the atmosphere of Triton in Pictures that arrived at Earth between 3:30 am and 5:30 am.  The principal layer seen here begins about three km (2 miles) above the surface, and is about 3 km thick.  Fainter upward extension of the haze has been seen to an altitude of at least 14 km (9 mi.).  The haze must be comoposed of tiny particles in order to be supported in Trition's thin atmosphere.  Composition of the haze is currently unknown, but may be either condensed atmospheric gases or complex orgainc molecules produced by irradiation of the methane in Triton's atmosphere.  The vaguely linear mottling on the surface may be shadows of other haze striations.  Other features of the haze layer should be appaarent in images of Triton taken at higher phase angles (including crescent phase).  The image shows features as small as 2 km (1.2 mi) wide. ARC-1989-A89-7031

Range : 168,694 km (105,000 mi.) Voyager 2 discovered detached limb h...

Range : 168,694 km (105,000 mi.) Voyager 2 discovered detached limb hazes in the atmosphere of Triton in Pictures that arrived at Earth between 3:30 am and 5:30 am. The principal layer seen here begins about ... more

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas. Thus, regions that appear white or bright red are those that reflect sunlight before it passes through a large quantity of methane. The image reveals the presence of a ubiquitous haze that covers Neptune in a semitransparent layer. Near the center of the disk, sunlight passes through the haze and deeper into the atmosphere, where some wavelenghths are absorbed by methane gas, causing the center to appear less red. Near the edge of the planet, the haze scatters sunlight at a higher altitude, above most of the methane, causing the bright red edge around the planet. By measuring haze brightness at several wavelengths, scientists are able to estimate the thickness of the haze and its ability to scatter sunlight. The image is among the last of the full-disk photos that Voyager 2 took before beginning its endless journey into interstellar space. ARC-1989-AC89-7036

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2...

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas. Thus, regi... more

Range :  4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than  the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the  wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade. ARC-1990-AC79-7127

Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-...

Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vant... more

Credit: Calar Alto Observatory Spectacular first view of Fragment Q impacts on Jupiter. Infrared image in the 2.3m micron methane band taken using MAGIC on the 3.5m telescope, Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. ARC-1994-AC94-0353-4

Credit: Calar Alto Observatory Spectacular first view of Fragment Q im...

Credit: Calar Alto Observatory Spectacular first view of Fragment Q impacts on Jupiter. Infrared image in the 2.3m micron methane band taken using MAGIC on the 3.5m telescope, Calar Alto Observatory, Spain.

Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter Atmosphere

Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter Atmosphere

Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter Atmosphere NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Equatorial Region in the Two Methane Bands Time Set 2

Jupiter Equatorial Region in the Two Methane Bands Time Set 2

Jupiter Equatorial Region in the Two Methane Bands Time Set 2 NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 1 NASA/JPL

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Mosaic of an equatorial "hotspot" on Jupiter at 889 nanometers (nm). The mosaic covers an area of 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers. Light at 889 nm is strongly absorbed by atmospheric methane. This image ... more

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3 NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 3 NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 4

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 4

Jupiter Equatorial Region in a Methane Band Time Set 4 NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Belt-Zone Boundary Methane filter, 732 nm

Jupiter Belt-Zone Boundary Methane filter, 732 nm

Mosaic of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter equator as seen by NASA Galileo orbiter in 1996. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mosaic of Jupiter Great Red Spot Methane Filter

Mosaic of Jupiter Great Red Spot Methane Filter

The mosaic of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter from NASA Galileo orbiter was taken over a 76 second interval beginning at universal time 14 hours, 33 minutes, 22 seconds, on June 26, 1996. NASA/JPL

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 3

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 3

These images, taken on February 19, 1997 by NASA Galileo orbiter, show two of the three long-lived White Ovals that formed to the south of the Jupiter Great Red Spot. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 3

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 3

This mosaic shows the features of a hazy cloud layer tens of kilometers above Jupiter main visible cloud deck as seen by NASA Galileo orbiter on February 19, 1997. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 4

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 4

This mosaic shows the features of Jupiter main visible cloud deck and upper-tropospheric haze, with higher features enhanced in brightness over lower features as seen by NASA Galileo orbiter on February 19, 19... more

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 4

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Time Set 4

This mosaic shows the features of Jupiter main visible cloud deck and upper-tropospheric haze, with higher features enhanced in brightness over lower features as seen by NASA Galileo orbiter on February 19, 19... more

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Band Time Set 2

These images, taken on February 19, 1997 by NASA Galileo orbiter, show two of the three long-lived White Ovals that formed to the south of the Jupiter Great Red Spot. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter Long-lived White Ovals in a Methane Band Time Set 2

These images, taken on February 19, 1997 by NASA Galileo orbiter, show two of the three long-lived White Ovals that formed to the south of the Jupiter Great Red Spot. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 1

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 2

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere in a Methane Band Time Set 3

Jupiter atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating eastward and westward jets from equatorial to polar latitudes. This image was taken on April 3, 1997, by NASA Galileo spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Saturn Methane Image

Saturn Methane Image

NASA's Cassini narrow angle camera took this image of Saturn on Feb. 16, 2004, from a distance of 66.1 million kilometers (41.1 million miles) in a special filter which reveals clouds and haze high in the atmos... more

Water Ice and Methane Springs

Water Ice and Methane Springs

Water Ice and Methane Springs NASA/JPL/ESA/University of Arizona

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space. New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2311

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacec... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory works on the New Horizons spacecraft before installing one of the panels.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2312

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory works on the New Horizons spacecraft before installing one of... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2313

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft. A series of interconnecting p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2315

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft. A serie... more