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Topic: marshall space flight center

1926
1926
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2017
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2017
5,858 media by topicpage 1 of 59
Early Rockets. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket.

Early Rockets. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket...

Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabb... more

Early Rockets - Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration

Early Rockets - Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration

Dr. Goddard's 1926 rocket configuration. Dr. Goddard's liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet awa... more

Wernher von Braun. Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified.

Wernher von Braun. Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine bei...

Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified ... more

Early Rockets - V-2 rocket emerges from its camouflaged shelter

Early Rockets - V-2 rocket emerges from its camouflaged shelter

In this undated file photo, probably from World War II, a V-2 rocket emerges from its camouflaged shelter. The team of German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States after World... more

Early Rockets -  Hermes A-1 rocket was designed by the U. S. Army after capturing the V-2

Early Rockets - Hermes A-1 rocket was designed by the U. S. Army afte...

The Hermes A-1 rocket was designed by the U. S. Army after capturing the V-2 rocket from the German army at the conclusion of the Second World War. The Hermes A-1 is a modified V-2 rocket; it utilized the Germa... more

Early Rockets  A-4 (Aggregate-4). Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2)

Early Rockets A-4 (Aggregate-4). Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Wea...

This drawing illustrates the vital dimensions of the A-4 (Aggregate-4). Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2), the rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German rocket team at Peenemuende, G... more

Huntsville, Alabama

Huntsville, Alabama

This 1940s photo of the South side of Square in downtown Huntsville, Alabama, looking west, shows a historical bank in the background with cars parked just South of the Courthouse (not shown in photo). (Courtes... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

In the years following World War II, the Army directed that the Huntsville, Alabama Arsenal be advertised for sale. The decision was reversed because the Army found it needed this land for the new missile work ... more

Early Rockets - A-4 (Aggregate-4) rocket. Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2).

Early Rockets - A-4 (Aggregate-4) rocket. Later renamed the V-2 (Venge...

The cutaway drawing of the A-4 (Aggregate-4) rocket. Later renamed the V-2 (Vengeance Weapon-2), The rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German rocket team at Peenemuende, Germany on the Balti... more

Around Marshall. Arsenal workers from Huntsville, Alabama.

Around Marshall. Arsenal workers from Huntsville, Alabama.

During World War II, Arsenal workers from Huntsville, Alabama, and surrounding areas responded to the call for civilian defense workers.

Early Rockets - Aggregate-4 (A-4) illustrates the dimensions and internal workings of the rocket. Later renamed the V-2

Early Rockets - Aggregate-4 (A-4) illustrates the dimensions and inter...

This German cutaway drawing of the Aggregate-4 (A-4) illustrates the dimensions and internal workings of the rocket. Later renamed the V-2, the rocket was developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the German Rocke... more

Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico

Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico

Goddard rocket in launching tower at Roswell, New Mexico, March 21, 1940. Fuel was injected by pumps from the fueling platform at left. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the developmen... more

Early Rockets: German technicians wire vehicles for mobile V-2 batteries

Early Rockets: German technicians wire vehicles for mobile V-2 batteri...

In this photograph from the fall of 1943, German technicians wire vehicles for mobile V-2 batteries in an abandoned railroad turnel in the Rhineland. The team of German engineers and scientists who developed th... more

Early Rockets: German technicians stack the various stages of the V-2 rocket

Early Rockets: German technicians stack the various stages of the V-2 ...

German technicians stack the various stages of the V-2 rocket in this undated photograph. The team of German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II a... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Collea... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

During World War II, Arsenal workers from Huntsville, Alabama. and surrounding areas responded to the call for civilian defense workers. This February 20, 1945 photo shows workers filling colored smoke grenades... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. Wernher von Braun surrenders to U.S. Army Counterintelligence persornel of the 44th Infantry Division in Ruette, Bavaria on May 2, 1945. Left to right are Charles Stewart, CIC agent; Dr. Herbert Axster; Die... more

Early Rockets: V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in 1946.

Early Rockets: V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in ...

A V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in 1946. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under t... more

Early Rockets V2 static test

Early Rockets V2 static test

A V-2 rocket is hoisted into a static test facility at White Sands, New Mexico. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocke... more

Mercury capsule and escape system on top of a booster

Mercury capsule and escape system on top of a booster

This photograph shows the installation of a Mercury capsule and escape system on top of a booster prior to test firing of the Mercury-Redstone at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Redstone Test Stand. Ass... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

General Medaris, (left) who was a Commander of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, during 1955 to 1958, shakes hands with Major General Holger Toftoy (right), who consolidated... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney i... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

As the nations missile and rocket program began to expand in the 50's, Huntsville, Alabama was the home to Redstone Arsenal and the famous team of rocket experts led by Dr. Wernher Von Braun. Soon Huntsville wa... more

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

A Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle awaits test-firing in the Redstone Test Stand during the late 1950s. Between 1953 and 1960, the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama performed hundreds of tes... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Five pioneers pose with scale models of their missiles they created in the 1950s. From left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger, a member of the original German rocket team who directed the Research Projects Office,... more

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

This historical photograph is of the Apollo Space Program Leaders. An inscription appears at the top of the image that states, “Our deep appreciation for your outstanding contribution to the success of Apollo ... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

Test firing of a Redstone Missile at Redstone Test Stand in the early 1950's. The Redstone was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the von Braun Team under the management ... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

Bumper Wac liftoff at the Long Range Proving Ground located at Cape Canaveral, Florida. At White Sands, New Mexico, the German rocket team experimented with a two-stage rocket called Bumper Wac, which intended ... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

A Bumper Wac, a combination the V-2 rocket with a WAC Corporal upper stage, awaits launch on July 24, 1950. It was the eighth in the Bumper Project and the vehicle reached the altitude of 393 kilometers. The Bu... more

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

The photograph shows the completed Saturn 1 S-1 stage (booster) during the checkout in the Marshall Space Flight Center, building 4705, January 23, 1961. The Saturn I S-I stage had eight H-1 engines clustered, ... more

Space Station

Space Station

This is a von Braun 1952 space station concept. In a 1952 series of articles written in Collier's, Dr. Wernher von Braun, then Technical Director of the Army Ordnance Guided Missiles Development Group at Redsto... more

The first Redstone was fired at Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 20, 1953. Redstone was the first major rocket development program for United States by the Peenemuende group led by Dr. Wernher von Braun. The Redstone launch photographed here, from November 17, 1954, was the fifth launch of a Redstone rocket. n/a

The first Redstone was fired at Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 20, ...

The first Redstone was fired at Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 20, 1953. Redstone was the first major rocket development program for United States by the Peenemuende group led by Dr. Wernher von Braun. The R... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

U.S. Army Redstone Rocket: The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alaba... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn proj... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a "bottle suit" model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, a... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

The members of the Peenemuende team and their family members were awarded the United States citizenship on April 14, 1955. Pictured here is Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (middle) and Dr. Wernher von Braun signing U.S. c... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

Launch of a three-stage Vanguard (SLV-7) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, September 18, 1959. Designated Vanguard III, the 100-pound satellite was used to study the magnetic field and radiation belt. In September ... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger at the Observatory of the Rocket City Astronomical Association in 1956.

----History

----History

This is a 1956 night shot of the east side of Square in downtown Huntsville, Alabama. Photo Courtesy of Huntsville Public Library

Navaho in flight, 1957. Navaho is a surface-to-surface missile developed by North American Aviation under the U.S. Air Force Navaho Program. The Navaho engine was an improvement of the V-2 engine. Though program began in March 1946 and was cancelled in July 1957, the research to develop the Navaho engine contributed to the development of the Redstone, Jupiter, Thor, and ATLAS engines. n/a

Navaho in flight, 1957. Navaho is a surface-to-surface missile develop...

Navaho in flight, 1957. Navaho is a surface-to-surface missile developed by North American Aviation under the U.S. Air Force Navaho Program. The Navaho engine was an improvement of the V-2 engine. Though progra... more

Jupiter Missile on test stand

Jupiter Missile on test stand

Installation of a Jupiter Missile in ABMA (Army Ballistic Missile Agency) West Test Stand, Jan. 16, 1957. Jupiter was a 1500-mile range missile

Jupiter Missile

Jupiter Missile

Installation of a Jupiter missile in ABMA (Army Ballistic Missile Agency) West Test Stand, Jan. 16, 1957. Jupiter was a 1500-mile range missile

Jupiter rocket - Early Rockets

Jupiter rocket - Early Rockets

The Jupiter rocket was designed and developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA). ABMA launched the Jupiter-A at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on March 1, 1957. The Jupiter vehicle was a direct derivative o... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

America’s first scientific satellite, the Explorer I, carried the radiation detection experiment designed by Dr. James Van Allen and discovered the Van Allen Radiation Belt. It was launched aboard a modified re... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

The Army Ballistic Missile Agency incorporated the von Braun team in key positions with Dr. von Braun as a head of the Development Operations Division. On October 4, 1957, the Nation was shocked when the Russia... more

Wernher von Braun in Huntsville, AL

Wernher von Braun in Huntsville, AL

This snapshot, dated November 1957, shows Dr. von Braun in downtown Huntsville, Alabama.

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Explorer 1 satellite. This photo was taken during the installation of Explorer-1, the first United States' Earth-orbiting satellite, to its launch vehicle, Jupiter-C, in January 1958

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) - Wernher von Braun

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) - Wernher von Braun

(From left to right) Karl L. Heimburg, Director of the Test Laboratory; Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Development Operation Division; and Major General John B. Medaris with the model of S-1B Test Stand... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

The modified Jupiter C (sometimes called Juno I), used to launch Explorer I, had minimum payload lifting capabilities. Explorer I weighed slightly less than 31 pounds. Juno II was part of America's effort to in... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

In January 1958, a modified Redstone rocket lifted the first American satellite into orbit just 3 months after the the von Braun team received the go-ahead. This modified Redstone rocket was known as a Jupiter-... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C Missile No. 27 assembly at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA), Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Aalabama. The Jupiter-C was a modification of the Redstone Missile, and originally developed as a ... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Director Dr. James Pickering, Dr. James van Allen of the State University of Iowa, and Army Ballistic missionile Agency Technical Director Dr. Wernher von Braun triumphantly display a ... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

This illustration shows the main characteristics of the Jupiter C launch vehicle and its payload, the Explorer I satellite. The Jupiter C, America's first successful space vehicle, launched the free world's fir... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Launch of Jupiter-C/Explorer 1 at Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 31, 1958. After the Russian Sputnik 1 was launched in October 1957, the launching of an American satellite assumed much greater importance. A... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Launch of Jupiter-C/Explorer 1 at Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 31, 1958. After the Russian Sputnik 1 was launched in October 1957, the launching of an American satellite assumed much greater importance. A... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Juno I, a slightly modified Jupiter-C launch vehicle, shortly before the January 31, 1958 launch of America's first satellite, Explorer I. The Jupiter-C, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team a... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Explorer 1 atop a Jupiter-C in gantry. Jupiter-C carrying the first American satellite, Explorer 1, was successfully launched on January 31, 1958. The Jupiter-C launch vehicle consisted of a modified version of... more

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Jupiter-C, the first American Satellite, Explorer 1 launcher

Activities in a blockhouse during the launch of Jupiter-C/Explorer 1 on January 31, 1958

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun inside the blockhouse during the launch of the Jupiter C/Explorer III in March 1958.

Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida

Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida

Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 16, 1958. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ba... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

On May 28, 1958, Jupiter Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile provided by U.S. Army team in Huntsville, Alabama, launched a nose cone carrying Baker, a South American squirrel monkey and Able, an American-born ... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Professor Hermann Oberth and Dr. von Braun are briefed on satellite orbits by Dr. Charles A. Lundquist at Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama.

High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)

This image is of the Crab Nebula in visible light photographed by the Hale Observatory optical telescope in 1959. The faint object at the center had been identified as a pulsar and is thought to be the remains ... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

In this photograph, the lunar and planetary exploration satellite, Pioneer III, is being prepared for installation to Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle. AM-11 was launched on December 5, 1959, but the mission was ... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Five of the seven original astronauts are seen with Dr. von Braun inspecting the Mercury-Redstone hardware in the Fabrication Laboratory of Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in 1959. Left to right: Astronaut... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

In this photo, Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown briefing the seven original Mercury astronauts in ABMA's Fabrication L... more

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

In this 1959 photograph, technicians prepare tail sections for Mercury-Redstone vehicles in Building 4706 at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Re... more

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

This photograph depicts installation of the Mercury capsule and escape system on top of a booster prior to test firing of the Mercury-Redstone launch vehicle at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, poses with the original Mercury astronauts in ABMA's Fabrication Laboratory during a 1959 visit. In... more

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

The Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) test tower being modified for testing the Saturn booster.

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Marshall Space Flight Center Director Wernher von Braun presents General J.B. Medaris with a new golf bag. General Medaris, (left) was a Commander of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

This photograph of Dr. von Braun, shown here to the left of General Bruce Medaris, was taken in the fall of 1959, immediately prior to Medaris' retirement from the Army. At the time, von Braun and his associate... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

A Juno II launched an Explorer VII satellite on October 13, 1959. Explorer VII, with a total weight of 91.5 pounds, carried a scientific package for detecting micrometeors, measuring the Earth's radiation balan... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Marshall Space Flight Center Director Wernher von Braun presents General J.B. Medaris with a new golf bag. General Medaris, (left) was a Commander of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal... more

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program

The H-1 engines for the Saturn I vehicle in the alignment fixture. A cluster of eight H-1 engines were used to thrust the first stage of the Saturn I launch vehicle. The H-1 engine was developed under the direc... more

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was created on October 1, 1958, to perform civilian research related to space flight and aeronautics. President Eisenhower commissioned Dr. T. Keith Gler... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

In this 1959 photo, taken at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Dr. von Braun (2nd from left) Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown conferring with Air Forc... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

In this picture, Dr. Wernher von Braun, who was serving as Director of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown posed with his Mercedes 220SE automobile in front of R... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun received a federal civilian service award from President Dwight Eisenhower on January 21, 1959.

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

In this photo, (left to right) Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Missile Firing Laboratory Chief Dr. Kurt Debus, Director of the ABMA Development Operations Division, Dr. von Braun and an unidentified indivi... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Installing Pioneer IV, payload for AM-14 (Juno II) onto the fourth stage on the cluster before a spin test, February 16, 1959. The Pioneer IV, lunar and planetary exploration satellite, was the first U.S. satel... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

In this photo, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, and Director of Missile Firing Division, Dr. Kurt Debus, are shown with unident... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun on the telephone prior to the launch of the Pioneer IV, March 1, 1959.

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-14) on the launch pad just prior to launch, March 3, 1959. The payload of AM-14 was Pioneer IV, America's first successful lunar mission. The Juno II was a modification of Jupiter ballistic missile

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

This photograph shows Dr. von Braun, second from the left, in the blockhouse at the Florida launch facilities on March 3, 1959. He and others gathered for the launch of the Pioneer IV satellite. On the left of ... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Wernher von Braun and his team were responsible for the Jupiter-C hardware. The family of launch vehicles developed by the team also came to include the Juno II, which was used to launch the Pioneer IV satellit... more

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

Juno II (AM-11) launch vehicle

The launch of Juno II (AM-14), carrying the lunar and planetary exploration satellite in orbit, Pioneer IV, on March 3, 1959. the Pioneer IV probe was the first U.S. satellite to orbit the Sun.

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun, Director of the Development Operations Divisons, and Dr. Debus, Director of the Missile Firing Laboratory; Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA), in the blockhouse during the launch of the Pioneer... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. von Braun at the launch control room during the Pioneer IV launch, March 3, 1959.

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, rides with his two daughters, Margrit and Iris, in a parade in downtown Huntsville, Alabama, M... more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, talks to Huntsville Mayor R. B. "Speck" Searcy, center, and Army Ordnance Missile Command (ARM... more

Mercury Project - original seven astronauts

Mercury Project - original seven astronauts

The group portrait of the original seven astronauts for the Mercury Project. NASA selected its first seven astronauts on April 27, 1959. Left to right at front: Walter M. Wally Schirra, Donald K. Deke Slayton, ... more

John H. Glenn - Mercury Project

John H. Glenn - Mercury Project

Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch ... more

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

Astronaut Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MR-4 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Redstone vehicle, made the second marned ... more

Mercury Project

Mercury Project

Astronaut Walter M. "Wally" Schirra, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-8 (Mercury-Atlas) mission with Sigma 7 spacecraft was the third marned or... more

Mercury Project - L. Gordon Cooper, Jr

Mercury Project - L. Gordon Cooper, Jr

Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper, Jr., one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-9 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas launch vehicle, was the last flight o... more

Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn Apollo Program

The first circumferential welding being applied on a Saturn fuel container in the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) fabrication laboratory, Building 4707, in May 1959.

Squirrel monkey, Able - Early Rockets

Squirrel monkey, Able - Early Rockets

A squirrel monkey, Able, is being ready for placement into a capsule for a preflight test of Jupiter, AM-18 mission. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959 and also carried a rhesus monkey, Baker, into suborbit.

Jupiter, AM-18, for pre-flight test - Early Rockets

Jupiter, AM-18, for pre-flight test - Early Rockets

The capsule ready to be installed in the nose cone of Jupiter, AM-18, for pre-flight test, May 18, 1959. The capsule carried monkeys, Baker and Able, as the payload of AM-18 mission

Jupiter (AM-18) - Early Rockets

Jupiter (AM-18) - Early Rockets

Jupiter (AM-18), suborbital primate flight with Able and Baker as its payload, being ready for launch, May 28, 1959