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Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program -  I S-I stage is being assembled

Saturn I - Saturn Apollo Program - I S-I stage is being assembled

The Saturn I S-I stage is being assembled in the fabrication and engineering laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The two end spider beams are cornected to the central 267-centimeter diameter liquid-... more

Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks  - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks - Saturn Apollo...

This photograph shows the Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks ready for transport from the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The tank... more

Saturn I in the fabrication and engineering laboratory - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I in the fabrication and engineering laboratory - Saturn Apollo...

The Saturn I S-I stage is being assembled in the fabrication and engineering laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The two end spider beams are cornected to the central 267-centimeter diameter liquid-... more

Saturn Apollo Program - F-1 rocket engine

Saturn Apollo Program - F-1 rocket engine

This chart provides the vital statistics for the F-1 rocket engine. Developed by Rocketdyne, under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the F-1 engine was utilized in a cluster of five engines to ... more

Saturn I liquid oxygen tank - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn I liquid oxygen tank - Saturn Apollo Program

The Saturn I liquid-oxygen (LOX) tank for the Saturn I S-I stage being aligned with the end spider beam in the fabrication and engineering laboratory, building 4705, at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

Saturn V F-1 Engine - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V F-1 Engine - Saturn Apollo Program

A close-up view of the F-1 Engine for the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage depicts the complexity of the engine. Developed by Rocketdyne under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the F-1 engine was ut... more

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

Saturn V - Saturn Apollo Program

This close-up view of the F-1 engine for the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage shows the engine's complexity, and also its large size as it dwarfs the technician. Developed by Rocketdyne, under the direction of the M... more

Space Shuttle Projects

Space Shuttle Projects

This photograph shows the liquid hydrogen tank and liquid oxygen tank for the Space Shuttle external tank (ET) being assembled in the weld assembly area of the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF). The ET provides l... more

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

NASA Tugboat Ferries Liquid Oxygen

NASA Tugboat Ferries Liquid Oxygen

The NASA tugboat transports liquid oxygen to the base of the B-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Stennis is NASA's facility for testing all Space Shuttle Main Engines before flight. Liquid hydrogen and liqu... more

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

LIQUID OXYGEN COOLED LOX RP-1 ROCKET ENGINE

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/2/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Location Building No: 202 Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

Liquid oxygen is loaded aboard an F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft from the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron. The F-16 aircraft is participating in its first overseas

Liquid oxygen is loaded aboard an F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft from t...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Flesland Air Station Country: Norway (NOR) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Servic... more

Liquid oxygen drained from a TMU-70M low-loss, closed-loop oxygen storage tank evaporates from a disposal pan aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN-69)

Liquid oxygen drained from a TMU-70M low-loss, closed-loop oxygen stor...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Atlantic Ocean (AOC) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy E. Didas Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A US Navy (USN) Sailor Green Shirt carries a LOX (Liquid Oxygen) tank past a USN SH-3H Sea King on the deck of the USN Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier USS NIMITZ (CVN 68)

A US Navy (USN) Sailor Green Shirt carries a LOX (Liquid Oxygen) tank ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Scene Camera Operator: PHAN Degner, USN Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

STAFF SGT. David Reyher from the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Section of the 23rd Supply Squadron obtains a sample of LOX for inspection. LOX is essential to the aircrews breathing systems aboard aircraft

STAFF SGT. David Reyher from the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Section of the 23...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pope Air Force Base State: North Carolina (NC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Dave Davenport Release Status: Rel... more

STAFF SGT. David Reyher (left) and STAFF SGT. Kenneth Tart of the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Section of the 23rd Supply Squadron change a cart with liquid nitrogen

STAFF SGT. David Reyher (left) and STAFF SGT. Kenneth Tart of the Liqu...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pope Air Force Base State: North Carolina (NC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Dave Davenport Release Status: Rel... more

Mobilized for Operation NOBLE EAGLE, STAFF Sergeant Corbett Allen, a crewchief for the Air National Guard's 192nd Fighter Wing, services the LOX (Liquid Oxygen) converter on an F-16C. The 192 FW is located just outside of Richmond in Sandston, Virginia. NOBLE EAGLE is a partial mobilization of the reserves for homeland defense and civil support missions in response to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 at the New York World Trade Center and the Pentagon

Mobilized for Operation NOBLE EAGLE, STAFF Sergeant Corbett Allen, a c...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: NOBLE EAGLE Base: Byrd Field State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: ACC Sc... more

STAFF Sergeant Patrick Beagle, fuels journeyman for the Virginia Air National Guard's 192nd Fighter Wing (FW) simulates the filling of LOX (Liquid Oxygen) cart with liquid oxygen for use on an F-16. The 192 FW is located just outside of Richmond in Sandston, Virginia

STAFF Sergeant Patrick Beagle, fuels journeyman for the Virginia Air N...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: NOBLE EAGLE Base: Byrd Field State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: ACC Sc... more

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Joel Smithson, Crewchief, 31st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (AMXS), uses the drill to open the 3308 Liquid Oxygen (LOX) panel to service the LOX box on the F-16 Fighting Falcon

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Joel Smithson, Crewchief,...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Aviano Air Base State: Pordenone Country: Italy (ITA) Scene Major Command Shown: USAFE Scene Camera Operator: A1C Isaac G. L. Freeman, USAF Rel... more

Machinist's Mate 3rd Class James Weyand checks gages on equipment in the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) shop aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73)

Machinist's Mate 3rd Class James Weyand checks gages on equipment in t...

Atlantic Ocean (Aug. 12, 2003) Machinist's Mate 3rd Class James Weyand checks gages on equipment in the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) shop aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73). Washington is currently conducting sea tr... more

Early Rockets

Early Rockets

By the end of the 19th Century, a Russian theorist, Konstantian Tsiolkovsky, was examining the fundamental scientific theories behind rocketry. He made some pioneering studies in liquid chemical rocket concepts... more

Aviation Structural Mechanic Equipment Airman Johnathan Williams, left, from Dallas, Texas, and Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Jamie Gonzales, from Los Angeles, Calif., recharge a bottle of Liquid Oxygen.

Aviation Structural Mechanic Equipment Airman Johnathan Williams, left...

Gulf of Alaska (Jun. 12, 2004) Aviation Structural Mechanic Equipment Airman Johnathan Williams, left, from Dallas, Texas, and Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Jamie Gonzales, from Los Angeles, Calif., recha... more

Massachusetts Air National Guard (MAANG) SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Ryan Ramsey (left) and Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Daniel Lanoue (right) 102nd Fighter Wing, gather a sample of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) for MAANG MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Echelmeyer (not shown), 102nd FW, serving as an Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE) Exercise Evaluation Team (EET) inspector, during a 102nd FW ORE at Otis Air National Guard Base (ANGB), Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts Air National Guard (MAANG) SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Ryan Rams...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Otis Angb State: Massachusetts (MA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Richard Perkins, USAF Release Status: Re... more

Massachusetts Air National Guard (MAANG) SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Ryan Ramsey (left) and Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Daniel Lanoue (right) 102nd Fighter Wing, gather a sample of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) for MAANG MASTER Sergeant (MSGT) Echelmeyer (not shown), 102nd FW, serving as an Operational Readiness Exercise (ORE) Exercise Evaluation Team (EET) inspector, during a 102nd FW ORE at Otis Air National Guard Base (ANGB), Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts Air National Guard (MAANG) SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Ryan Rams...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Otis Angb State: Massachusetts (MA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Richard Perkins, USAF Release Status: Re... more

Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Miguel Toledo checks the pressure on a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) converter aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).

Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Miguel Toledo checks the pressure on a Liqu...

Persian Gulf (Dec. 06, 2004) Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Miguel Toledo checks the pressure on a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) converter aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Currently, air... more

S121E05145 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical,feed line and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05145 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical,feed line and attachment point...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical, feed line and right aft orbiter attachment point on the External Tank (ET) taken from the umbilical well camera on t... more

s121E08376 - STS-121 - STS-121 Landing inspection and tile survey of the orbiter Discovery

s121E08376 - STS-121 - STS-121 Landing inspection and tile survey of t...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up view of a Line 1 Liquid Oxygen (LO2) Filll and Drain port, 50V41PD12, on the orbiter Discovery taken during the landing inspection and tile s... more

S121E05164 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05164 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbite...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05153 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05153 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05143 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05143 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken dur...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: External Tank (ET) Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical and right aft orbiter attachment point taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at ET separa... more

S121E05154 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05154 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05141 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05141 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up of the External Tank (ET) Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical and right aft orbiter attachment point taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbi... more

S121E05157 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05157 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line and nose of the ET are visible. Image tak... more

S121E05162 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05162 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbite...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05149 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05149 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05151 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05151 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05165 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05165 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbite...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05148 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05148 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05159 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05159 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05150 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05150 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05155 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05155 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05156 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05156 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line and nose of the ET are visible. Image tak... more

s121E08373 - STS-121 - STS-121 Landing inspection and tile survey of the orbiter Discovery

s121E08373 - STS-121 - STS-121 Landing inspection and tile survey of t...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up view of a Liquid Oxygen (LO2) Filll and Drain port on the orbiter Discovery taken during the landing inspection and tile survey at the completi... more

S121E05001 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05001 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up of the External Tank (ET) Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical and right aft orbiter attachment point taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbi... more

S121E05152 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05152 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line is visible on the ET. Image taken from th... more

S121E05160 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05160 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05163 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05163 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbite...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05161 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05161 - STS-121 - Nose of the ET as it falls away from the orbite...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Nose of the External Tank (ET) as it falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). Image taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbiter at E... more

S121E05158 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05158 - STS-121 - ET falls away from the orbiter during ET SEP on...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The External Tank (ET) falls away from the orbiter at ET Separation (SEP). The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line and nose of the ET are visible. Image tak... more

S121E05147 - STS-121 - ET LO2 feed line and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05147 - STS-121 - ET LO2 feed line and attachment point taken dur...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The right Liquid Oxygen (LO2) feed line and right aft orbiter attachment point on the External Tank (ET) taken from the umbilical well camera on the orb... more

S121E05144 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical, feed line and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05144 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical, feed line and attachment poin...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical, feed line and right aft orbiter attachment point on the External Tank (ET) taken from the umbilical well camera on t... more

S121E05140 - STS-121 - Close-up ET right LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05140 - STS-121 - Close-up ET right LO2 umbilical and attachment ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up of the External Tank (ET) right Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical and orbiter aft attachment point taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbi... more

S121E05146 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical,feed line and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05146 - STS-121 - ET LO2 umbilical,feed line and attachment point...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: The Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical, feed line and right aft orbiter attachment point on the External Tank (ET) taken from the umbilical well camera on t... more

S121E05142 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point taken during ET SEP on STS-121

S121E05142 - STS-121 - Close-up ET LO2 umbilical and attachment point ...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Close-up of the External Tank (ET) Liquid Oxygen (LO2) umbilical and right aft orbiter attachment point taken from the umbilical well camera on the orbi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The "beanie cap," at the end of the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm, is extended over the top of the external tank. The cap is a vent hood  that vacuums away the very cold liquid oxygen vapors as they boil off from the top of the external tank before launch.  Lower down on the left is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room on the outer end, extended toward Atlantis' crew access hatch. Below the orbiter, on each side of the main engine nozzles, are the tail service masts that provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6- to 8-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1722

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the har...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The "beanie cap," at the end of the external ta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building.  Extending from the fixed service structure on the left is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room on the outer end, adjacent to Atlantis.  Below the orbiter, on each side of the main engine nozzles, are the tail service masts that provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.   Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1726

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hards...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. Extending from the fixed service structure on th... more

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Jason Pry (left) and USAF SENIOR AIRMAN (SRA) Justin Butler, both assigned to the 169th Maintenance Squadron (MXS), fill the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank on an F-16C Fighting Falcon aircraft in preparation for deployment at McEntire Air National Guard Base (ANGB), South Carolina (SC), as part of an Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) role for the Pacific Air Forces (PACAF)

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Jason Pry (left) and USA...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcentire Ang Station State: South Carolina (SC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: TSG Carol M. Smith, USAF Release ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The shuttle had been moved off the launch pad due to concerns about the impact of Tropical Storm Ernesto, expected within 24 hours.  The forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2008

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is b...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Below the mobile launcher platform, on which Atlantis rests, is the crawler-transporter beginning to move away from the platform.  The shuttle had been moved off the launch pad due to concerns about the impact of Tropical Storm Ernesto, expected within 24 hours.  The forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2010

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is b...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Below the mobile launcher platform, on which Atlantis rests, is the crawler-transporter beginning to move away from the platform.  The shuttle had been moved off the launch pad due to concerns about the impact of Tropical Storm Ernesto, expected within 24 hours.  The forecast of lesser winds expected from Ernesto and its projected direction convinced Launch Integration Manager LeRoy Cain and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach to return the shuttle to the launch pad.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2009

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is b...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After sunset, Space Shuttle Atlantis is bathed in light from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39B. Seen on either side of Atlantis' engine nozzles are the tail masts, which... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B.  At far left is the rotating service structure, rolled back to enable launch.   Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the FSS. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the FSS, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-116 at 9:35 p.m. today.  On the mission, the crew will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2672

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B. At far left is the rotating service structure, rolled back to enable ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B.  Atop the fixed service structure at left looms the 80-foot-high lightning mast, part of the lightning protection system on the pad.  Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the FSS. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the FSS, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-116 at 9:35 p.m. today.  On the mission, the crew will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2671

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a clear blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B. Atop the fixed service structure at left looms the 80-foot-high light... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    Under a blue sky streaked with clouds, Launch Pad 39B holds Space Shuttle Discovery, ready for launch of mission STS-116.  At the far left is the rotating service structure, rolled back after midnight in preparation for launch.  Next to Discovery is the fixed service structure, with the 80-foot-high lightning mast on top, part of the lightning protection system on the pad. Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the FSS. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the FSS, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-116 at 9:35 p.m. today.  On the mission, the crew will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2674

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a blue sky streaked with clouds...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a blue sky streaked with clouds, Launch Pad 39B holds Space Shuttle Discovery, ready for launch of mission STS-116. At the far left is the rotating service structure, rol... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Under a blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B.  Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the FSS. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the FSS, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-116 at 9:35 p.m. today.  On the mission, the crew will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-06pd2673

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a blue sky, Space Shuttle Discov...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a blue sky, Space Shuttle Discovery is ready for launch of mission STS-116 from Launch Pad 39B. Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilic... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Discovery is bathed in light on Launch Pad 39B after rollback of the rotating service structure after midnight.  Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Seen above the golden external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the FSS. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Below it, also extending toward Discovery from the FSS, is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end. The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-116 at 9:35 p.m. today.  On the mission, the crew will deliver truss segment, P5, to the International Space Station and begin the intricate process of reconfiguring and redistributing the power generated by two pairs of U.S. solar arrays. The P5 will be mated to the P4 truss that was delivered and attached during the STS-115 mission in September. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-06pd2670

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery is bathed in li...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Discovery is bathed in light on Launch Pad 39B after rollback of the rotating service structure after midnight. Beneath Discovery's wings are the tail masts, which ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Atop the massive mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling through the open door of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the journey to Launch Pad 39A.  First motion was at 8:19 a.m. In front of each of Atlantis' wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. The 3.4-mile trip to the pad along the crawlerway will take about 6 hours. The mission payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is the S3/S4 integrated truss structure, along with a third set of solar arrays and batteries. The crew of six astronauts will install the truss to continue assembly of the International Space Station.  Launch is targeted for March 15.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd0384

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Atop the massive mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Atop the massive mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling through the open door of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the journey to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Atop the massive mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling through the open door of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the journey to Launch Pad 39A.  First motion was at 8:19 a.m. In front of each of Atlantis' wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. The 3.4-mile trip to the pad along the crawlerway will take about 6 hours.  The mission payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is the S3/S4 integrated truss structure, along with a third set of solar arrays and batteries. The crew of six astronauts will install the truss to continue assembly of the International Space Station.  Launch is targeted for March 15.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd0385

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Atop the massive mobile launcher platfor...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Atop the massive mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling through the open door of the Vehicle Assembly Building for the journey to L... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the lighted mobile launcher platform, exits the Vehicle Assembly Building for rollout to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the VAB was at 8:10 p.m.  July 10, and the shuttle was hard down on the pad at 3:02 a.m. July 11.  Seen below the orbiter's wings and attached to the launcher platform are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The shuttle and platform are being carried by the crawler-transporter.  The trip will take between six and eight hours.  Endeavour is scheduled to launch on mission STS-118 on Aug. 7.  During the mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The mission is the 22nd flight to the International Space Station and will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.  STS-118 will be the first flight since 2002 for Endeavour, which has undergone extensive modifications, including the addition of safety upgrades already added to orbiters Discovery and Atlantis.  Photo credit: NASA/Tom Farrar KSC-07pd1854

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the lighted mobile launcher platform, exits the Vehicle Assembly Building for rollout to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the VAB was at... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Near sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, begins moving through the doors of the Vehicle Assembly Building for rollout to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the VAB was at 8:10 p.m.  July 10, and the shuttle was hard down on the pad at 3:02 a.m. July 11.  Seen below the orbiter's wings and attached to the launcher platform are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Endeavour is scheduled to launch on mission STS-118 on Aug. 7.  During the mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The mission is the 22nd flight to the International Space Station and will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.  STS-118 will be the first flight since 2002 for Endeavour, which has undergone extensive modifications, including the addition of safety upgrades already added to orbiters Discovery and Atlantis.  Photo credit: NASA/Tom Farrar KSC-07pd1853

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Near sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, at...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Near sunset, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, begins moving through the doors of the Vehicle Assembly Building for rollout to Launch Pad 39A. First motio... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, is hard down on Launch Pad 39A after rolling out over night.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 8:10 p.m.  July 10.  The components of the shuttle are, first, the orbiter and then the solid rocket boosters flanking the external tank behind it.  Attached to the platform and seen below the orbiter's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Near the cockpit of Endeavour is the orbiter access arm, which provides access into the vehicle.   Endeavour is scheduled to launch on mission STS-118 on Aug. 7.  During the mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The mission is the 22nd flight to the International Space Station and will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.  STS-118 will be the first flight since 2002 for Endeavour, which has undergone extensive modifications, including the addition of safety upgrades already added to orbiters Discovery and Atlantis.  Photo credit: NASA/Ken Thornsley KSC-07pd1841

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, is hard down on Launch Pad 39A after rolling out over night. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 8:... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  After a nearly 7-hour trip, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, is hard down on Launch Pad 39A at 3:02 a.m.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 8:10 p.m.  July 10.  The components of the shuttle are, first, the orbiter and then the solid rocket boosters flanking the external tank behind it.  Seen below the orbiter's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Endeavour is scheduled to launch on mission STS-118 on Aug. 7.  During the mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The mission is the 22nd flight to the International Space Station and will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.  STS-118 will be the first flight since 2002 for Endeavour, which has undergone extensive modifications, including the addition of safety upgrades already added to orbiters Discovery and Atlantis.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd1825

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a nearly 7-hour trip, Space Shutt...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After a nearly 7-hour trip, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, is hard down on Launch Pad 39A at 3:02 a.m. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Build... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Space Shuttle Endeavour is on Launch Pad 39A and ready for prelaunch processing after a nearly 7-hour trip from the Vehicle Assembly Building.  First motion out of the VAB was at 8:10 p.m.  July 10, and the shuttle was hard down on the pad at 3:02 a.m. July 11. The orbiter access arm is already extended to the orbiter from the fixed service structure at left.  On top of the structure is the 80-foot-tall lightning mast that helps provide protection from lightning on the pad.  The shuttle sits on a mobile launcher platform.  Part of the platform and seen below the orbiter's wings are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Endeavour is scheduled to launch on mission STS-118 on Aug. 7.  During the mission, Endeavour will carry into orbit the S5 truss, SPACEHAB module and external stowage platform 3. The mission is the 22nd flight to the International Space Station and will mark the first flight of Mission Specialist Barbara Morgan, the teacher-turned-astronaut whose association with NASA began more than 20 years ago.  STS-118 will be the first flight since 2002 for Endeavour, which has undergone extensive modifications, including the addition of safety upgrades already added to orbiters Discovery and Atlantis.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd1828

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour is on Launch P...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour is on Launch Pad 39A and ready for prelaunch processing after a nearly 7-hour trip from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the rotating service structure has rolled away to uncover space shuttle Endeavour, resting on the mobile launcher platform.  First motion was at 8:23 a.m. and rollback was complete at 8:55 a.m. Above the orange external tank is seen the "beanie cap" at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the fixed service structure. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle.  Below is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end, flush against the shuttle.  The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  On either side of the main engines and below the wings are the tail service masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. The rotating structure provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations.  The pad is cleared to the perimeter gate for operations to fill the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants used by the shuttle’s main engines. This is done at the pad approximately eight hours before the scheduled launch.  Endeavour and its crew will deliver the first section of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory and the Canadian Space Agency's two-armed robotic system, Dextre.  Launch is scheduled for 2:28 a.m. EDT March 11.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0667

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Spa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the rotating service structure has rolled away to uncover space shuttle Endeavour, resting on the mobile launcher platform. Firs... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, rollback of the rotating service structure reveals space shuttle Endeavour atop the mobile launcher platform. First motion was at 8:23 a.m. and rollback was complete at 8:55 a.m. Above the orange external tank is seen the "beanie cap" at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the fixed service structure. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle.  Below is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end, flush against the shuttle.  The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  On either side of the main engines and below the wings are the tail service masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The rotating structure provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations.  The pad is cleared to the perimeter gate for operations to fill the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants used by the shuttle’s main engines. This is done at the pad approximately eight hours before the scheduled launch.  Endeavour and its crew will deliver the first section of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory and the Canadian Space Agency's two-armed robotic system, Dextre.  Launch is scheduled for 2:28 a.m. EDT March 11.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0671

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Spac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, rollback of the rotating service structure reveals space shuttle Endeavour atop the mobile launcher platform. First motion was at ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, rollback of the rotating service structure (at left) reveals space shuttle Endeavour atop the mobile launcher platform.  First motion was at 8:23 a.m. and rollback was complete at 8:55 a.m. Above the orange external tank is seen the "beanie cap" at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, extending from the fixed service structure. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle.  Below is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end, flush against the shuttle.  The crew gains access into the orbiter through the White Room.  On either side of the main engines and below the wings are the tail service masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The rotating structure provides protected access to the orbiter for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. The structure is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots about a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations.  The pad is cleared to the perimeter gate for operations to fill the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants used by the shuttle’s main engines. This is done at the pad approximately eight hours before the scheduled launch.  Endeavour and its crew will deliver the first section of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory and the Canadian Space Agency's two-armed robotic system, Dextre.  Launch is scheduled for 2:28 a.m. EDT March 11.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0670

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Spac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, rollback of the rotating service structure (at left) reveals space shuttle Endeavour atop the mobile launcher platform. First mot... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --     Bathed in lights surrounding Launch Pad 39A and its structures at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Discovery is poised for launch on the STS-124 mission after rollback of the rotating service structure. First motion was at 8:33 p.m. and rollback was complete at 9:07 p.m.  The structure provides protected access to the shuttle for changeout and servicing of payloads at the pad. It is supported by a rotating bridge that pivots on a vertical axis on the west side of the pad's flame trench. After the RSS is rolled back, the orbiter is ready for fuel cell activation and external tank cryogenic propellant loading operations.  The pad is cleared to the perimeter gate for operations to fill the external tank with about 500,000 gallons of cryogenic propellants used by the shuttle’s main engines. This is done at the pad approximately eight hours before the scheduled launch.  Behind the shuttle is the orange external tank and the two solid rocket boosters (only one seen here).  Beneath the shuttle's starboard wing is one of two tail service masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory.  The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS.  The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks.  Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-08pd1505

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Bathed in lights surrounding Launch Pad 39...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Bathed in lights surrounding Launch Pad 39A and its structures at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Discovery is poised for launch on the STS-124 mission after rollback of t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch.  Above the external tank is the "beanie cap," the oxygen vent hood that is designed to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the shuttle.  At center against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm.  The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle.  Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below.  On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven.  This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12.  The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structu...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch. Above the external ta... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch.  Against Endeavour's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm.  The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle.  Endeavour sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below.  On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. First motion of the RSS was at 10:15 a.m. EDT. The rollback is in preparation for Endeavour's liftoff on the STS-127 mission with a crew of seven.  This is the second launch attempt for Endeavour after the June 13 launch was scrubbed due to a hydrogen leak at the Ground Umbilical Carrier Plate during tanking June 12.  The launch will be Endeavour's 23rd flight. The shuttle will carry the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility, or JEM-EF, and the Experiment Logistics Module-Exposed Section, or ELM-ES, on STS-127. The mission is the final of three flights dedicated to the assembly of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory complex on the space station. Endeavour's launch is scheduled for June 17 at 5:40 a.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-3728

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structu...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is closer to launch. Against Endeavour's c... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery arrives on top of Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. In the foreground next to Discovery's main engines is one of the two tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4424

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform,...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery arrives on top of Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Bui... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is closer to launch on the STS-128 mission. Against the shuttle's cockpit is seen the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. The White Room provides the astronauts entry into the shuttle. Discovery sits on the mobile launcher platform, which straddles the flame trench below. On either side of the engine nozzles are the tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  Liftoff is scheduled for 1:36 a.m. EDT Aug. 25.The service structure provides weather protection and access to the space shuttle at the launch pad. The 13-day mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. STS-128 will be Discovery's 37th mission and the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and maintenance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4818

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structur...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is closer to launch on the STS-128 mission. ... more

Vessels installed at A-3

Vessels installed at A-3

Construction of the A-3 Test Stand approaches another milestone with delivery and installation of water, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. The three LOX tanks shown on the left and the two ... more

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUSTS DUAL LENSES FOR A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE 1000538

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJ...

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUSTS DUAL LENSES FOR A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME.... more

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) AND ERIC EARHART (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER41 PROPULSION STRUCTURAL & DYNAMICS ANALYSIS BRANCH) DISCUSS DATA PRODUCED BY A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE. 1000539

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) AND...

AYMAN GIRGIS (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) AND ERIC EARHART (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER41 PROPULSION STRUCTURAL & DYNAMICS ANALYSIS BRANCH) DISCUSS DATA PRODUCED BY A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST ... more

ERIC EARHART (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER41 PROPULSION STRUCTURAL & DYNAMICS ANALYSIS BRANCH) DISCUSSES DATA PRODUCED BY A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE 1000540

ERIC EARHART (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER41 PROPULSION STRUCTURAL & DYNAMIC...

ERIC EARHART (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER41 PROPULSION STRUCTURAL & DYNAMICS ANALYSIS BRANCH) DISCUSSES DATA PRODUCED BY A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TE... more

NATHAN HORACE STRONG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINERY DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT BRANCH) AND NATHAN COFFEE (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUST A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE. COFFEY, AT RIGHT, WORK IN A LAB IN BUILDING 4612 ON A BEARING TEST 1000537

NATHAN HORACE STRONG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINE...

NATHAN HORACE STRONG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINERY DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT BRANCH) AND NATHAN COFFEE (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUST A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETU... more

TATHAN COFFEE (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUSTS A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE 1000541

TATHAN COFFEE (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) AD...

TATHAN COFFEE (EM10 MATERIALS TEST ENGINEER, JACOBS ESTS GROUP/JTI) ADJUSTS A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXT... more

HORACE STORNG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINERY DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT BRANCH) ADJUSTS A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT THE SAME TIME. THE TEST FIXTURE HOLDS A SPECIMEN THAT REPRESENTS A LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX) BEARING FROM THE J2-X ENGINE 1000542

HORACE STORNG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINERY DESI...

HORACE STORNG (AEROSPACE ENGINEER, ER31 PROPULSION TURBOMACHINERY DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT BRANCH) ADJUSTS A UNIQUE MECHANICAL TEST SETUP THAT MEASURES STRAIN ON A SINGLE SAMPLE, USING TWO DIFFERENT TECHNIQUES AT T... more