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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker controls the rotation of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0796

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker controls the rotation of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0792

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is sche... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0797

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0791

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is sche... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0797

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0792

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is sche... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0793

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.<font size="3" KSC00pp0795

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0793

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers check the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates, with its ceiling now on the underside. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0794

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers check the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates, with its ceiling now on the underside. A component of the International Space Sta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker controls the rotation of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0796

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker controls the rotation of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers check the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates, with its ceiling now on the underside. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0794

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers check the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates, with its ceiling now on the underside. A component of the International Space Sta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.<font size="3" KSC-00pp0795

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0791

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is sche... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. KSC-00pp0798

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. KSC00pp0798

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians watch closely as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts and moves the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts and moves the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts and moves the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts and moves the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0810

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Des...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Buildin... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0809

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Opera... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides overhead other hardware while visitors watch from a window (right). On the floor, left to right, are two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, and a Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (right). Destiny is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0807

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides overhead other hardware while visitors watch from a wi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0810

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Des...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Buildin... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. On the floor of the SSPF, left, is a Pressurized Mating Adapter-3. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0808

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Ope... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted off a weigh stand (below) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0805

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted off a weigh stand (below) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is being moved... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides above two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, in the Space Station Processing Facility. Destiny is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0806

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides above two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, in the Spa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0809

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lowered into a payload canister for transfer to the Opera... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. On the floor of the SSPF, left, is a Pressurized Mating Adapter-3. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0808

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Ope... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides overhead other hardware while visitors watch from a window (right). On the floor, left to right, are two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, and a Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (right). Destiny is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC00pp0807

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides overhead other hardware while visitors watch from a wi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides above two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, in the Space Station Processing Facility. Destiny is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0806

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, glides above two Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules (MPLMs), Raffaello (far left) and Leonardo, in the Spa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted off a weigh stand (below) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is being moved to a payload canister for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building where it will be tested in the altitude chamber. Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab in the Space Station during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the Station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research KSC-00pp0805

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a component of the International Space Station, is lifted off a weigh stand (below) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is being moved... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the part of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny that will bear the NASA logo. Destiny is the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC-00pp1928

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the part of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny that will bear the NASA logo. Destiny is the key U.S. element of the International... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, the “key” to the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is officially handed over to NASA during a brief ceremony while workers look on. Suspended overhead is the laboratory, being moved to the Launch Package Integration Stand (LPIS) for a weight and center of gravity determination. Behind the workers at left is the Joint Airlock Module. Destiny is the payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98 to the International Space Station. The lab is fitted with five system racks and will already have experiments installed inside for the flight. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1936

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the “key” to the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is officially handed over to NASA during a brief ceremony while workers look on. Suspended overh... more

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the NASA logo that will go on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC-00pp1927

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the NASA logo...

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the NASA logo that will go on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Sh... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the part of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny that will bear the NASA logo. Destiny is the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1928

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility prepare the part of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny that will bear the NASA logo. Destiny is the key U.S. element of the International... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The NASA logo is place on the side of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. The key U.S. element of the International Space Station, Destiny is in the Space Station Processing Facility. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1930

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The NASA logo is place on the side of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The NASA logo is place on the side of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. The key U.S. element of the International Space Station, Destiny is in the Space Station Processing Facility. La... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The NASA logo is place on the side of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. The key U.S. element of the International Space Station, Destiny is in the Space Station Processing Facility. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC-00pp1930

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The NASA logo is place on the side of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The NASA logo is place on the side of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. The key U.S. element of the International Space Station, Destiny is in the Space Station Processing Facility. La... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility place the NASA logo on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC-00pp1929

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility place the NASA logo on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility place the NASA logo on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS-98 on Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry Destiny to the Space Station with five system racks and experiments already installed inside the module. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1929

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility place the NASA logo on the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, the key U.S. element of the International Space Station. Launch of mission STS... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The U.S. Laboratory Destiny travels past the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo in its overhead passage down the Space Station Processing Facility. The lab is being moved to the Launch Package Integration Stand (LPIS) for a weight and center of gravity determination. Destiny is the payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98 to the Space Station. The lab is fitted with five system racks and will already have experiments installed inside for the flight. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1938

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny travels pas...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny travels past the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo in its overhead passage down the Space Station Processing Facility. The lab is being moved to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In its overhead passage down the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny travels past the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Both are elements in the construction of the International Space Station. The lab is being moved to the Launch Package Integration Stand (LPIS) for a weight and center of gravity determination. Destiny is the payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98 to the Space Station. The lab is fitted with five system racks and will already have experiments installed inside for the flight. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1937

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In its overhead passage down the Space ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In its overhead passage down the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny travels past the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. Both are elements in the ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, the “key” to the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is officially handed over to NASA during a brief ceremony while workers look on. Suspended overhead is the laboratory, being moved to the Launch Package Integration Stand (LPIS) for a weight and center of gravity determination. Destiny is the payload aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98 to the International Space Station. The lab is fitted with five system racks and will already have experiments installed inside for the flight. The launch is scheduled for January 2001 KSC00pp1935

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the “key” to the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is officially handed over to NASA during a brief ceremony while workers look on. Suspended overh... more

STS098-708-094 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-094 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-086 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-086 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-089 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-089 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-090 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-090 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-087 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-087 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-093 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-093 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-095 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-095 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-097 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-097 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-096 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-096 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-088 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-088 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-091 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-091 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-092 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-092 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-085 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-085 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

STS098-708-098 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S. Laboratory Destiny

STS098-708-098 - STS-098 - View of Atlantis payload bay taken from U.S...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the thermal blankets in the STS-98 orbiter Atlantis payload bay taken from the International Space Station (ISS) Alpha's Destiny laboratory mod... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny rests once again in Atlantis’s payload bay, at Launch Pad 39A. Closing of the payload bay doors is imminent. Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station, is 28 feet long and weighs 16 tons. This research and command-and-control center is the most sophisticated and versatile space laboratory ever built. It will ultimately house a total of 23 experiment racks for crew support and scientific research. Destiny will be launched Feb. 7 on STS-98, the seventh construction flight to the ISS KSC01pp0207

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny rests once a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The U.S. Laboratory Destiny rests once again in Atlantis’s payload bay, at Launch Pad 39A. Closing of the payload bay doors is imminent. Destiny, a key element in the construction ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny waits in Atlantis’s payload bay for closure of the payload bay doors. Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station, is 28 feet long and weighs 16 tons. This research and command-and-control center is the most sophisticated and versatile space laboratory ever built. It will ultimately house a total of 23 experiment racks for crew support and scientific research. Destiny will be launched Feb. 7 on STS-98, the seventh construction flight to the ISS KSC01pp0208

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, the U.S. Laboratory D...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny waits in Atlantis’s payload bay for closure of the payload bay doors. Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Atlantis’s payload bay doors are ready to be closed over the U.S. Laboratory Destiny (lower left). Next to it is the Canadian robotic arm, which will play a major role in moving Destiny to its place on the International Space Station. Destiny, a key element in the construction of the Space Station, is 28 feet long and weighs 16 tons. This research and command-and-control center is the most sophisticated and versatile space laboratory ever built. It will ultimately house a total of 23 experiment racks for crew support and scientific research. Destiny will be launched Feb. 7 on STS-98, the seventh construction flight to the ISS KSC01pp0209

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Atlantis’s payload ba...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39A, Atlantis’s payload bay doors are ready to be closed over the U.S. Laboratory Destiny (lower left). Next to it is the Canadian robotic arm, which will play a majo... more

In the Payload Changeout Room at Launch Pad 39A, a film crew from IMAX prepares its 3-D movie camera to film the payload bay door closure on Atlantis. Behind them is the payload, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, which will fly on mission STS-98, the seventh construction flight to the ISS. Destiny, a key element in the construction of the International Space Station, is 28 feet long and weighs 16 tons. This research and command-and-control center is the most sophisticated and versatile space laboratory ever built. It will ultimately house a total of 23 experiment racks for crew support and scientific research. Launch of Atlantis is Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC-01pp0210

In the Payload Changeout Room at Launch Pad 39A, a film crew from IMAX...

In the Payload Changeout Room at Launch Pad 39A, a film crew from IMAX prepares its 3-D movie camera to film the payload bay door closure on Atlantis. Behind them is the payload, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, wh... more

STS098-S-005 (7 Feb. 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), Feb. 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the  station using the shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-005

STS098-S-005 (7 Feb. 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, lifto...

STS098-S-005 (7 Feb. 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), Feb. 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. labo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew crosses the parking apron at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after their arrival aboard the T-38 jets in the background. Getting ready to greet the media are, left to right, Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins. The crew has returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0227

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew crosses the parking apro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew crosses the parking apron at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after their arrival aboard the T-38 jets in the background. Getting ready to greet the media are, left... more

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Ivins’ fifth space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0224

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing ...

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbe... more

STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Cockrell’s fourth space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0222

STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility ...

STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew greets the media at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after their arrival from Houston. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Marsha Ivins. The crew has returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0228

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew greets the media at the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-98 crew greets the media at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility after their arrival from Houston. Standing, left to right, are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Pola... more

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Ivins’ fifth space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0225

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing ...

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbe... more

STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky grins on his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Polansky’s first space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0223

STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky grins on his arrival at the Shuttle Landing...

STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky grins on his arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and ... more

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (left) speaks to astronaut Pam Melroy, who piloted the T-38 jet that brought Ivins to KSC. Ivins and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones have returned to KSC to prepare for their launch to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, STS-98 will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments. The 11-day mission includes three spacewalks to complete outside assembly and connection of electrical and plumbing lines between the laboratory, Station and a relocated Shuttle docking port. STS-98 is Ivins’ fifth space flight. Launch is targeted for Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST KSC01pp0226

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (left) speaks to astronaut Pam ...

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins (left) speaks to astronaut Pam Melroy, who piloted the T-38 jet that brought Ivins to KSC. Ivins and other crew members Commander Ken Cockrell, Pilot Mark Polansky and Mis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, near the nose of the Shuttle Training Aircraft he just landed, makes his way across the parking apron of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of the STA is outfitted like the Shuttle, which provides practice at the controls, especially for landing. The STS-98 crew recently arrived at KSC to prepare for their launch Feb. 7 to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, it will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments KSC01padig048

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, near the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, near the nose of the Shuttle Training Aircraft he just landed, makes his way across the parking apron of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, taxis into line at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of the plane is outfitted like the Shuttle, which provides practice at the controls, especially for landing. The STS-98 crew recently arrived at KSC to prepare for their launch Feb. 7 to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, it will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments KSC01padig046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, taxis into line at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of the plane is outfitted like the Shuttle, ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, rolls to a stop in line next to another STA at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of the STA is outfitted like the Shuttle, which provides practice at the controls, especially for landing. The STS-98 crew recently arrived at KSC to prepare for their launch Feb. 7 to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, it will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments KSC01padig047

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Shuttle Training Aircraft, piloted by STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell, rolls to a stop in line next to another STA at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. The cockpit of the STA is ou... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, T-38 jet training aircraft are lined up on the parking apron. T-38s are typically used by astronauts to travel between Johnson Space Center, Houston, and Kennedy Space Center. The STS-98 crew recently arrived aboard the jets to prepare for their launch Feb. 7 to the International Space Station. The seventh construction flight to the Space Station, it will carry the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module for space experiments KSC01padig043

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, T-38 je...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, T-38 jet training aircraft are lined up on the parking apron. T-38s are typically used by astronauts to travel between Johnson Space Center, Housto... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. --  Lights on the Fixed Service Structure give a holiday impression at Launch Pad 39A where Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for launch. Above the yellow-orange external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm, with the “beanie cap” vent hood raised. Before cryogenic loading, the hood will be lowered into position over the external tank vent louvers to vent gaseous oxygen vapors away from the Shuttle. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01padig055

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Lights on the Fixed Service Structure g...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Lights on the Fixed Service Structure give a holiday impression at Launch Pad 39A where Space Shuttle Atlantis is poised for launch. Above the yellow-orange external tank is the G... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking relaxed and happy one day before launch, the STS-98 crew gather at Launch Pad 39A. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them is Space Shuttle Atlantis, poised for launch. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the first Shuttle mission of the year. On the mission, the crew will deliver the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to the growing Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work. The 11-day STS-98 mission is scheduled to launch Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST, with a planned KSC landing about 1:39 p.m. on Feb. 18 KSC01padig050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking relaxed and happy one day before...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking relaxed and happy one day before launch, the STS-98 crew gather at Launch Pad 39A. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists M... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. --  This closeup reveals Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the Rotating Service Structure. Extended to the side of Atlantis is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room at its end. The White Room provides entry for the crew into Atlantis’s cockpit. Below Atlantis, on either side of the tail are the tail service masts. They support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft T-0 umbilicals. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01padig054

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This closeup reveals Space Shuttle Atla...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This closeup reveals Space Shuttle Atlantis after rollback of the Rotating Service Structure. Extended to the side of Atlantis is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room at it... more

The STS-98 crew, gathered at Launch Pad 39A one day before launch, wave and give a thumbs up. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them is Space Shuttle Atlantis, poised for launch.This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the first Shuttle mission of the year. On the mission, the crew will deliver the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to the growing Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work. The 11-day STS-98 mission is scheduled to launch Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST, with a planned KSC landing about 1:39 p.m. on Feb. 18 KSC01padig051

The STS-98 crew, gathered at Launch Pad 39A one day before launch, wav...

The STS-98 crew, gathered at Launch Pad 39A one day before launch, wave and give a thumbs up. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam... more

A happy and relaxed STS-98 crew pause for a photo at Launch Pad 39A one day before launch. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam and Thomas Jones. Behind them is Space Shuttle Atlantis, poised for launch.This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the International Space Station and the first Shuttle mission of the year. On the mission, the crew will deliver the U.S. Laboratory Destiny to the growing Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work. The 11-day STS-98 mission is scheduled to launch Feb. 7 at 6:11 p.m. EST, with a planned KSC landing about 1:39 p.m. on Feb. 18 KSC01padig052

A happy and relaxed STS-98 crew pause for a photo at Launch Pad 39A on...

A happy and relaxed STS-98 crew pause for a photo at Launch Pad 39A one day before launch. From left, they are Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins, Robert Curbeam an... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Trailing a column of flame-bright smoke, Space Shuttle Atlantis clears the lightning rod on Launch Pad 39A as it climbs into the early evening sky. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0282

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Trailing a column of flame-bright smoke,...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Trailing a column of flame-bright smoke, Space Shuttle Atlantis clears the lightning rod on Launch Pad 39A as it climbs into the early evening sky. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m.... more

The STS-98 crew eagerly exits the Operations and Checkout Building to head for Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. Leading the crew are Pilot Mark Polansky (left) and Commander Ken Cockrell (right). In the center is Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins. Behind her are Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam (left) and Thomas Jones (right). They will be flying the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0273

The STS-98 crew eagerly exits the Operations and Checkout Building to ...

The STS-98 crew eagerly exits the Operations and Checkout Building to head for Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. Leading the crew are Pilot Mark Polansky (left) and Commander Ken Cockrell (right). In th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A, the glare from its exhaust is captured in various colors. Liftoff for mission STS-98 occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01pp0280

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into th...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A, the glare from its exhaust is captured in various colors. Liftoff for mission STS-98 occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST... more

STS098-S-010 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the  station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-010

STS098-S-010 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, l...

STS098-S-010 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U... more

Space Shuttle Atlantis surpasses the full moon for beauty as it roars into the early evening sky trailing a tail of smoke. The upper portion catches the sun’s rays as it climbs above the horizon and a flock of birds soars above the moon. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0277

Space Shuttle Atlantis surpasses the full moon for beauty as it roars ...

Space Shuttle Atlantis surpasses the full moon for beauty as it roars into the early evening sky trailing a tail of smoke. The upper portion catches the sun’s rays as it climbs above the horizon and a flock of ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis pours flames and clouds behind as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0286

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis pours flames and ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis pours flames and clouds behind as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the... more

The closeout crew in the White Room help STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell with final suitup before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0291

The closeout crew in the White Room help STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell...

The closeout crew in the White Room help STS-98 Commander Ken Cockrell with final suitup before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the... more

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0290

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A on miss...

Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts into the sky from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module ... more

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam sends a message to his wife before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0294

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Ro...

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam sends a message to his wife before entering Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled ... more

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins has help getting into her launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0267

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins has help getting into her launc...

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins has help getting into her launch and entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atla... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, clouds of smoke and steam appear to surround it. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01pp0283

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, clouds of smoke and steam appear to surround it. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew ... more

Its tail bathed in light, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into space on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0289

Its tail bathed in light, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into space on m...

Its tail bathed in light, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into space on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key modu... more

In the White Room before launch, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins gets a hug from a closeout crew member before she enters Space Shuttle Atlantis. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0295

In the White Room before launch, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivin...

In the White Room before launch, STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins gets a hug from a closeout crew member before she enters Space Shuttle Atlantis. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at t... more

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins is nearly ready for launch in her launch and entry suit. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0271

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins is nearly ready for launch in h...

STS-98 Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins is nearly ready for launch in her launch and entry suit. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Labora... more

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky happily undergoes final suit preparations before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0293

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky h...

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky happily undergoes final suit preparations before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled... more

The STS-98 crew gathers around a table for a snack before getting ready for launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis. Seated left to right are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrell and Mission Specialists Marsha Ivins and Robert Curbeam. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0265

The STS-98 crew gathers around a table for a snack before getting read...

The STS-98 crew gathers around a table for a snack before getting ready for launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis. Seated left to right are Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, Pilot Mark Polansky, Commander Ken Cockrel... more

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is helped getting into his launch and entry suit for the 11-day mission. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0269

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is...

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is helped getting into his launch and entry suit for the 11-day mission. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tree branches across the water from Launch Pad 39A provide a frame for the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle's robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01PP0281

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tree branches across the water from Laun...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Tree branches across the water from Launch Pad 39A provide a frame for the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-98. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a cr... more

Like 10,000 fireworks going off at once, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the moonlit sky while clouds of steam and smoke cascade behind. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. EST KSC01padig056

Like 10,000 fireworks going off at once, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars ...

Like 10,000 fireworks going off at once, Space Shuttle Atlantis roars into the moonlit sky while clouds of steam and smoke cascade behind. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlant... more

STS098-S-009 (7 February 2001) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the  station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three space walks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. sts098-s-009

STS098-S-009 (7 February 2001) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlant...

STS098-S-009 (7 February 2001) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key modu... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rising from clouds of smoke and steam, Space Shuttle Atlantis rushes into the night sky as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. The glare of the flames and clouds is captured in the water near the pad. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:00 p.m. EST KSC01pp0279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rising from clouds of smoke and steam, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Rising from clouds of smoke and steam, Space Shuttle Atlantis rushes into the night sky as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A. The glare of the flames and clouds is captured in the w... more

Suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam has a thumbs-up for launch. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks, by Curbeam and Mission Specialist Thomas Jones, are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0270

Suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Mission Spe...

Suiting up in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-98 Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam has a thumbs-up for launch. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is... more

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones shows a message to his family before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled room at the end of the Orbiter Access Arm. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m KSC01pp0292

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Th...

In the White Room with the closeout crew, STS-98 Mission Specialist Thomas Jones shows a message to his family before he enters Space Shuttle Atlantis for launch. The White Room is an environmentally controlled... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, it lights up the nearby water. Billows of smoke and steam fill Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. EST. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program. The planned landing is at KSC Feb. 18 about 1 p.m. EST KSC01PP0278

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts off fro...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As Space Shuttle Atlantis blasts off from Launch Pad 39A on mission STS-98, it lights up the nearby water. Billows of smoke and steam fill Launch Pad 39A. Liftoff occurred at 6:13:... more