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Navy recruits carrying M-1 rifles pass in review at the Recruit Training Command. The rifles have been reintroduced in Navy boot camps after a five-year hiatus to develop teamwork and aid in body conditioning

Navy recruits carrying M-1 rifles pass in review at the Recruit Traini...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: San Diego State: California (CA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH1 Terry Mitchell Release Status: Released to P... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is viewed from above the altitude chamber into which it was lowered during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, depositing it into the altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 20-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0231

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building'...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is viewed from above the altitude chamber into which it w... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, a crane lifts the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF) and simulated module during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, lifting it up and into an altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 24-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0228

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building'...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, a crane lifts the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF) and simulated module during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Viewed from inside the altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, depositing it into the altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 24-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0230

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Viewed from inside the altitude chamber ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Viewed from inside the altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered during... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered by crane into the altitude chamber below during a test. Under normal operation, the RHF will hold a pressurized module intended for the International Space Station, depositing it into the altitude chamber for leak testing. The chamber was recently reactivated after a 24-year hiatus. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. In 1997, in order to increase the probability of successful missions aboard the ISS, NASA decided to perform leak tests on ISS pressurized modules at the launch site. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation and handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The rotation handling fixture is aluminum. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0229

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building'...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building's high bay, the Rotation Handling Fixture (RHF), with a simulated module attached, is lowered by crane into the altitude chamber below durin... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the 27.5-ton lid is lowered onto the top of an altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay. The chamber was recently reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0234

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the 27.5-ton lid is low...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers watch as the 27.5-ton lid is lowered onto the top of an altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay. The chamber was recently reactivated, after a 24-... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking as if poised in flight, the saucer-like lid of an altitude chamber is lifted from the floor in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay to its place on top of the chamber. The chamber was recently reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0233

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking as if poised in flight, the sauc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Looking as if poised in flight, the saucer-like lid of an altitude chamber is lifted from the floor in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay to its place on top of the cham... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane lifts the saucer-like 27.5-ton lid of an altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay. The chamber was recently reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test Apollo Program flight hardware. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0232

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane lifts the saucer-like ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An overhead crane lifts the saucer-like 27.5-ton lid of an altitude chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay. The chamber was recently reactivated, after a 24-year ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay, Center Director Roy Bridges remarks on the accomplishment of the joint NASA/Boeing team in renovating an altitude chamber formerly used on the Apollo program. Project team members, management, media and onlookers are present for the ribbon cutting. The chamber was reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test the Apollo command and lunar service modules. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0235

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Build...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay, Center Director Roy Bridges remarks on the accomplishment of the joint NASA/Boeing team in renovating an altitude chamber form... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cutting a red ribbon for the unveiling of a newly renovated altitude chamber are (left to right) Tommy Mack, project manager, NASA; Steve Francois, director, Space Station and Shuttle Payloads; Sterling Walker, director, Engineering Development; Roy Bridges, director, Kennedy Space Center; Jay Greene, International Space Station manager for Technical; Michael Terry, project manager, Boeing; and Terry Smith, director of Engineering, Boeing Space Coast Operations. The chamber was reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test the Apollo command and lunar service modules. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0237

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cutting a red ribbon for the unveiling o...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Cutting a red ribbon for the unveiling of a newly renovated altitude chamber are (left to right) Tommy Mack, project manager, NASA; Steve Francois, director, Space Station and Shut... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a ribbon-cutting ceremony inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay, Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development, introduces the project team members responsible for renovating an altitude chamber formerly used on the Apollo program. In addition, management, media and onlookers are present for the ceremony. Seated in the front row left are (left to right) Terry Smith, director of Engineering, Boeing Space Coast Operations; Steve Francois, director, Space Station and Shuttle Payloads; Jay Greene, International Space Station manager for Technical; and Roy Bridges, center director. The chamber was reactivated, after a 24-year hiatus, to perform leak tests on International Space Station pressurized modules at the launch site. Originally, two chambers were built to test the Apollo command and lunar service modules. They were last used in 1975 during the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. After installation of new vacuum pumping equipment and controls, a new control room, and a new rotation handling fixture, the chamber again became operational in February 1999. The chamber, which is 33 feet in diameter and 50 feet tall, is constructed of stainless steel. The first module that will be tested for leaks is the U.S. Laboratory. No date has been determined for the test KSC-99pp0236

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a ribbon-cutting ceremony inside the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a ribbon-cutting ceremony inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay, Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development, introduces the project team members respons... More

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus NASA/JPL/MSSS

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus

MGS MOC Returns to Service Following Solar Conjunction Hiatus NASA/JPL/MSSS

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands.  Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands.  Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Or...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in th... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands.  Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to th...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed i... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers accompany the orbiter Atlantis as it is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands.  Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers accompany the orbiter Atlantis a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers accompany the orbiter Atlantis as it is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowe... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building.  The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands.  Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in ... More