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Mercator, Gerhard

Mercator, Gerhard

Radierer: Goltzius, Hendrick Datierung: 1573 / 1617

Mercator, Gerhard
[Gerhard Mercator, half-length portrait, facing left, holding compass and globe, at age 62]

[Gerhard Mercator, half-length portrait, facing left, holding compass ...

Title devised by Library staff. Illus. in: Atlas sive Cosmographicae meditationes de fabrica mvndi et fabricati figvra. Dvisbvrgi Clivorvm : [1595] Published in: The tradition of technology : Landmarks of Weste... more

Mercator, Gerhard

Mercator, Gerhard

Stecher: Bry, Johann Theodor de Datierung: 1597 / 1599

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Zeichner: Dürr, Johann (1600) Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600) Datierung: 1625 / 1675

Voss, Gerhard Johannes

Voss, Gerhard Johannes

Radierer: unbekannter Künstler Datierung: 1600 / 1750 Verlagsort:

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Sengenwald, Georg Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600)

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600) Datierung: 1637 / 1663

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600) Datierung: 1634 / 1663

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600) Datierung: 1634 / 1663

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Stecher: Dürr, Johann (1600) Drucker: Sengenwald, Georg Datierung: 1637 / 1663

Coch, Gerhard

Coch, Gerhard

unbekannter Künstler

Coch, Gerhard

Coch, Gerhard

Verleger: Aubry, Peter (2)

Coch, Gerhard

Coch, Gerhard

Stecher: Does, Antony van der

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Hertel, Zacharias (der Ältere) Verlagsort: Hamburg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verlag: Endter, Johann Andreas u. Wolfgang d. J. (Erben) Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verlag: Endter, Johann Andreas u. Wolfgang d. J. (Erben) Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Stecher: Hafner, Melchior (1) faktischer Entstehungsort: Augsburg

Gerhard, Johann Ernst

Gerhard, Johann Ernst

Verleger: Hoffmann, Johann Stecher: Franck, Johann Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Hoffmann, Johann Stecher: Azelt, Johann Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Voss, Gerhard Johannes

Voss, Gerhard Johannes

Stecher: Franck, Johann

Gerhard, Johann Ernst

Gerhard, Johann Ernst

Verleger: Hoffmann, Johann Stecher: Franck, Johann Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Mercator, Gerhard

Mercator, Gerhard

Radierer: Azelt, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Kloss, Johann Herbord Verlagsort: Leipzig

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Kloss, Johann Herbord Verlagsort: Leipzig

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Radierer: Schurtz, Cornelius Nicolaus

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Verleger: Renger, Johann Gottfried Stecher: Mentzel, Johann Georg (1677) Verlagsort: Halle (Saale)

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Verleger: Renger, Johann Gottfried Stecher: Mentzel, Johann Georg (1677) Verlagsort: Halle (Saale)

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Verleger: Renger, Johann Gottfried Stecher: Mentzel, Johann Georg (1677) Verlagsort: Halle (Saale)

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Verleger: Renger, Johann Gottfried Stecher: Mentzel, Johann Georg (1677) Verlagsort: Halle (Saale)

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Titius, Gottlieb Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Meier, Gerhard

Meier, Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Meier, Gerhard

Meier, Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Meier, Gerhard

Meier, Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Meier, Gerhard

Meier, Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Meier, Gerhard

Meier, Gerhard

Stecher: Bernigeroth, Martin Verlag: Gleditsch, Johann Friedrich d. Ä. u. Sohn Johann Gottlieb Verlagsort: Leipzig

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verlag: Endter, Wolfgang Moritz (Erben) Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verlag: Endter, Wolfgang Moritz (Erben) Verlagsort: Nürnberg

Gerhard, Johann

Gerhard, Johann

Verleger: Martini, Johann Christian Stecher: Fritzsch, Christian Verlagsort: Leipzig

Gerhard, Daniel - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]
Gerhard, P G - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]
Gerhard, S W - State: [Blank] - Year: 1862
Gerhard, Theodore - State: Maryland - Year: 1863
Holthouse, Gerhard - State: [Blank] - Year: 1864
[Two illustrations--head-and-shoulders portrait of Gerhard Mercator, facing right; and 1569 world map, drawn by Mercator]

[Two illustrations--head-and-shoulders portrait of Gerhard Mercator, f...

Print of Abraham Ortelius based on painting by Peter Paul Rubens. Illus. in Narrative and critical history of America / Winsor. 1886, v. 4, p. 372. Reference copy in BIOG. FILE - Mercator, Gerhard.

[Emme and Mayme Gerhard]

[Emme and Mayme Gerhard]

Illustration shows portrait of Gerhard sisters sitting in profile. Illus. in: Notable women of St. Louis, 1914; ed. and pub. by Mrs. Chas. P. Johnson. [St. Louis: Woodward, c1914], bet. pp. 78-79. Title devised... more

[Emme and Mayme Gerhard]

[Emme and Mayme Gerhard]

Illustration shows portrait of Gerhard sisters standing and holding hands. Illus. in: Bulletin of photography, the weekly magazine for the professional photographer. Philadelphia, F. V. Chambers, vol. 18, no. 4... more

Gerhard, J - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - South Carolina First Artillery Ge-Ho

Gerhard, J - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - South Carolina First Artill...

Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations

[Mary Kean, half-length portrait, seated, facing front with head tilted to the right] / Gerhard Sisters, St. Louis.

[Mary Kean, half-length portrait, seated, facing front with head tilte...

J202216 U.S. Copyright Office. Title from item. Copyright by Gerhard Sisters, St. Louis.

Alien Property Custodian - Property Seized - Alien Property seized by U.S. Alien Property Custodian. Gerhard & Hey, Inc, N.Y.C
Alien Property Custodian - Property Seized - Alien Property seized by U.S. Alien Property Custodian. Gerhard & Hey, Inc, N.Y.C
Ägare:/1923-66/: Johann Gerdelmann. Hemort: Haren an der Ems.

Ägare:/1923-66/: Johann Gerdelmann. Hemort: Haren an der Ems.

Ägare:/1923-66/: Johann Gerdelmann. Hemort: Haren an der Ems.

Painting Roosevelt Room; Gerhard Franze putting grass wallpaper on Susan's room next to Oval Office
Team of Horses on Gerhard Miller's Upper Ranch

Team of Horses on Gerhard Miller's Upper Ranch

People in photograph: Unidentified; Unidentified; Miller, Gerhard Jr.; Miller, Theodore; Unidentified; Miller, Gerhard Sr.; Unidentified

Gravestones of Elizabeth and Gerhard Miller, Sr.

Gravestones of Elizabeth and Gerhard Miller, Sr.

Inscription on both graves: "Native of Germany"

The ground breaking ceremony takes place at the site for a new medical clinic. Taking part in the event are, from left: COL John W. Handy; MGEN Alexander M. Sloan, command surgeon, Headquarters, U.S. European Command; Gerhard Hubsch; BGEN Paul D. Gleason, director, professional affairs and quality assurance, Air Force Office of Medical Support and COL R.J. Jones

The ground breaking ceremony takes place at the site for a new medical...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Rhein-Main Air Base Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: SRA Rodney Kern Release Status: Released to Public Combined Milit... more

Portrait of Astronaut Candidate Gerhard Thiele

Portrait of Astronaut Candidate Gerhard Thiele

S97-01066 (20 Aug. 1996) --- Astronaut Gerhard P. J. Thiele, mission specialist representing German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR).

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, senior government officials from 15 countries participating in the space station program signed agreements in Washington D.C. on Jan. 29 to establish the framework of cooperation among the partners on the design, development, operation and utilization of the space station. Acting Secretary of State Strobe Talbott signed the 1998 Intergovernmental Agreement on Space Station Cooperation with representatives of Russia, Japan, Canada, and participating countries of the European Space Agency ESA -- Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Some of these officials then toured Kennedy's Space Station Processing Facility SSPF with NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, at front, sixth from the left. They are, left to right, front to back: Hidetoshi Murayama, National Space Development Agency of Japan NASDA Louis Laurent, Embassy of France Haakon Blankenborg, Norwegian Parliament Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs His Excellency Joris Vos, ambassador of the Netherlands His Excellency Tom Vraalsen, ambassador of Norway Goldin Luigi Berlinguer, Italian minister for education, scientific, and technological research Antonio Rodota, director general, ESA Yvan Ylieff, Belgian minister of science and chairman of the ESA Ministerial Council Jacqueline Ylieff Masaaki Komatsu, Kennedy local NASDA representative and interpreter Serge Ivanets, space attache, Embassy of Russia Hiroshi Fujita, Science and Technology Agency of Japan Akira Mizutani, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Peter Grognard, science attache', Royal Embassy of Belgium Michelangelo Pipan, Italian diplomatic counselor to the minister His Excellency Gerhard Fulda, German Federal Foreign Office Jorg Feustel-Buechl, ESA director of manned space flight and microgravity A. Yakovenko, Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs JoAnn Morgan, Kennedy associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades Steve Francois, director, International Space Station and Shuttle Processing Roy Tharpe, Boeing launch site manager Jon Cowart, ISS elements manager John Schumacher, NASA associate administrator for external relations Didier Kechemair, space advistor to the French minister for education, research, and technology Yoshinori Yoshimura, NASDA and Loren Shriver, Kennedy deputy director for launch and payload processing. Node 1 of the ISS is in the background. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-98pc246

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the International Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, senior government officials from 15 countries participating in the space station program... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew pose in front of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the payload for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri of Japan, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), and Janice Voss (Ph.D.); Commander Kevin R. Kregel; Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany; and Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie. Mohri represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan and Thiele represents the European Space Agency. An international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0776

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew pose in fron...

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew pose in front of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the payload for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri of Japan, Janet Lyn... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members take part in a simulated flight check of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), above and behind them. The SRTM is the payload for their mission. The crew members are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri of Japan and Gerhard Thiele of Germany. Mohri represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan and Thiele represents the European Space Agency. An international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0775

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members take par...

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members take part in a simulated flight check of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), above and behind them. The SRTM is the payload for their missi... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew looks over the payload for their mission, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Pointing to the SRTM are Commander Kevin R. Kregel and Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele of Germany. Behind them are (left to right) Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri of Japan and Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) The remaining crew member (not shown) is Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.) Mohri represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan and Thiele represents the European Space Agency. An international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0777

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew looks over t...

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the STS-99 crew looks over the payload for their mission, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Pointing to the SRTM are Commander Kevin R. Kregel and Mission Sp... more

The STS-99 crew poses in front of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew has been checking out the SRTM, which is the payload for their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri of Japan, and Gerhard Thiele of Germany; Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie; Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.); and Commander Kevin R. Kregel. Mohri represents the National Space Development Agency of Japan and Thiele represents the European Space Agency. An international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0778

The STS-99 crew poses in front of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission...

The STS-99 crew poses in front of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The crew has been checking out the SRTM, which is the payload for their mission. From left... more

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members inspect the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the payload for their mission. At left is Commander Kevin R. Kregel talking to Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.); and Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan farther back. In the foreground (back to camera) is Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.). The final crew member (not shown) is Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie. Thiele represents the European Space Agency and Mohri represents the National Space Agency of Japan. An international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0774

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members inspect ...

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-99 crew members inspect the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the payload for their mission. At left is Commander Kevin R. Kregel talking to Mission Speciali... more

Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in the Saturn V replica didication ceremony at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Pictured are (L/R): Walter Jacobi, Konrad Dannenberg, Apollo 14's Edgar Mitchell, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, Apollo 12's Dick Gordon, Gerhard Reisig, Werner Dahm, MSFC Director Art Stephenson, Director of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center Mike Wing, Walter Haeusserman, and Ernst Stuhlinger. n/a

Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in th...

Members of the original Von Braun german rocket team participate in the Saturn V replica didication ceremony at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. Pictured are (L/R): Walter Jacobi, Konrad Dan... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), the STS-99 crew take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Facing the camera and pointing is Mission Specialist Gerhard P.J. Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency. Other crew members in the OPF are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-99 mission is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0996

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF)...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), the STS-99 crew take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Facing the camera and pointing is Mission Specialist Gerhard P.J. Thi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-99 crew look over the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), primary payload for their mission, as part of a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Participating are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D), Mamoru Mohri, and Gerhard P.J. Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The SRTM is a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0997

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, memb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-99 crew look over the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), primary payload for their mission, as part of a Crew Equipment... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard P.J. Thiele look over part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), primary payload for their mission, as part of a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Also taking part in the CEIT are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The SRTM is a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0999

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard P.J. Thiele look over part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), pri... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Gerhard P.J. Thiele and Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) look over part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), primary payload for their mission, as part of a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Also taking part in the CEIT are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The SRTM is a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0998

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Gerhard P.J. Thiele and Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) look over part of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), pri... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri (center), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.) (right) talk with a KSC worker (left) during a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. Others taking part are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard P.J. Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency. The SRTM is a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp1000

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri (center), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.) (r... more

Under the watchful eyes of a KSC worker (far left), members of the STS-99 crew check out equipment in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 2. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Gerhard P.J. Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.). Mohri represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele the European Space Agency. Other crew members (not shown) are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.). The crew are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), which provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-99 mission is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0995

Under the watchful eyes of a KSC worker (far left), members of the STS...

Under the watchful eyes of a KSC worker (far left), members of the STS-99 crew check out equipment in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 2. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Gerhard P.J. Th... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 2, under the watchful eyes of a KSC worker (far left) the STS-99 crew look over equipment as part of a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). From left (second from right) are Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, Gerhard P.J. Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.); behind Voss are Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Commander Kevin R. Kregel. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-99 mission is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp0994

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 2, under the watchful eye...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) Bay 2, under the watchful eyes of a KSC worker (far left) the STS-99 crew look over equipment as part of a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). From left (second from r... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri (left center), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.) look over equipment during a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. Others taking part are Commander Kevin R. Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard P.J. Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency. The SRTM is a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. The SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-99pp1001

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri (left center), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Janice Voss (Ph.D... more

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri, and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are here to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which provides simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0009

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle ...

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Jan... more

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew talk to the media. At the microphone is Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are here to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which provides simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Others taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), and Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0008

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew t...

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew talk to the media. At the microphone is Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. ... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0005

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arr...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew w... more

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 training jet aircraft (background), the STS-99 crew talk to the media. From left are Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, Commander Kevin Kregel (at microphone) and Pilot Dominic Gorie. The crew are here to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which provides simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0006

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 traini...

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 training jet aircraft (background), the STS-99 crew talk to the media. From left are Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (... more

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri, and Pilot Dominic Gorie. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are here to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which provides simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0009

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle ...

The STS-99 crew pose for a photo after their arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele, and Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialists Jan... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0003

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agen...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves after his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Gerhard P.J. Thiele, with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0004

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves after his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdow... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves after his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Gerhard P.J. Thiele, with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0004

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves after his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdow... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0003

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agen...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency, arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0005

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arr...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) smiles on her arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 training jet aircraft to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew w... more

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew talk to the media. At the microphone is Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency. At left is Commander Kevin Kregel. . The crew are here to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), which provides simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Others taking part in the TCDT are Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0007

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew t...

After their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew talk to the media. At the microphone is Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele, with the European Space Agency. At left is Commander Kevin Kregel.... more

STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 training jet to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part are Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Gerhard Thiele, who is with the European Space Agency. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0002

STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facilit...

STS-99 Commander Kevin Kregel arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 training jet to take part in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). The TCDT provides the crew with simulated count... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding on the front), trainer with the KSC Fire Department. The vehicle is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities and could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear of the carrier are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (center), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Commander Kevin Kregel. TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0013

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding ... more

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding on the front), trainer with the KSC Fire Department. The vehicle is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities and could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear of the carrier are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (center), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Commander Kevin Kregel. TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST KSC00pp0013

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space...

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding ... more