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Topic: footprint

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1823
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2014
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2014
62 media by topicpage 1 of 1
Impression of a Dinosaur Trace Fossil Footprint

Impression of a Dinosaur Trace Fossil Footprint

This artifact is a fiberglass replica of an impression of a 200 million-year-old Eubrontes giganteus dinosaur track that was discovered in 1970 in a Roseland, New Jersey quarry by two high school students. The ... more

Apollo 11 Bootprint

Apollo 11 Bootprint

(July 20, 1969) One of the first steps taken on the Moon, this is an image of Buzz Aldrin's bootprint from the Apollo 11 mission. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the Moon on July 20, 1969...Image # : A... more

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

This is a close-up view of an astronaut’s foot and footprint in the lunar soil, photographed by a 70 mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). The first manned lu... more

Close-up view of astronauts foot and footprint in lunar soil

Close-up view of astronauts foot and footprint in lunar soil

AS11-40-5880 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's boot and bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (... more

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

This is a close-up view of an astronaut’s footprint in the lunar soil, photographed by a 70 mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The first manned lunar mission, th... more

Close-up view of astronauts footprint in lunar soil

Close-up view of astronauts footprint in lunar soil

AS11-40-5878 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. While... more

AS15-88-11867 - Apollo 15 - Apollo 15 Mission image - View of Station 8, Microfilm cassette and footprint

AS15-88-11867 - Apollo 15 - Apollo 15 Mission image - View of Station ...

The original database describes this as: Description: View of Station 8, Microfilm cassette and footprint taken during the third Extravehicular Activity (EVA 3) of the Apollo 15 mission. Original film magazine... more

Return to "Giant's Footprint" 3 Decades After Mariner 7 Flyby

Return to "Giant's Footprint" 3 Decades After Mariner 7 Flyby

As we head into the 21st Century, it seems hard to believe that human beings have been sending spacecraft toward Mars for more than 3 decades already. The first spacecraft to reach Mars was Mariner 4 in 1965. T... more

Moessbauer Footprint in the Soil

Moessbauer Footprint in the Soil

This 3-D anaglyph, from NASA Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, shows a circular imprint left in the Meridiani Planum soil by the rover Moessbauer spectrometer. 3D glasses are necessary. NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS

AS14-68-9396 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View during the begining of EVA2 of a stone on the edge of depression footprint.

AS14-68-9396 - Apollo 14 - Apollo 14 Mission image - View during the b...

The original database describes this as: Description: View during the begining of EVA2 of a stone on the edge of depression footprint. Images were taken by during EVA 2 of the Apollo 14 mission. Original film ... more

Around Marshall

Around Marshall

Among several other NASA dignitaries, former astronaut Neil A. Armstrong visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in attendance of the annual NASA Advisory Council Meeting. While here, Mr. Armstrong was ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6800

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Prope...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up constructi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6795

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, high-density foam insulation between the concrete layers of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6802

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, high-density foam insulation between the concrete layers of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, concrete layers on either side of the high-density foam insulation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, concrete layers on either side of the high-density foam insulation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6799

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up constructio... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6793

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the w...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility get a layer of high-density foam insulation.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6801

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility get a layer of high-density foam insulation. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in the background, is witness to the formation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, a new "green" building under construction in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1114

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in the background, is witness to the formation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, a new "green" building under ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1111

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility glides through the air into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1108

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility glides through the air into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the first wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place.  In the background is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1106

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the first wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place. In the background is... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, man and machine work side by side to position the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, man and machine work side by side to position the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, reminiscent of a barn-raising, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility springs into being in a single day as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1121

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, reminiscent of a barn-raising, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility springs into being in a single... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker is seen through an opening left for a doorway in a newly erected wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1113

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker is seen through an opening left for a doorway in a newly erected wall of the Propellants North Administrative and ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the final shape of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility becomes apparent as its walls are erected.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1120

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the final shape of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility becomes apparent as its walls are erected.... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of construction workers ensures that the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility are installed properly.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1117

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of construction workers ensures that the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility are ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1112

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lowered into the trench which will support it.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1110

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lowered into the trench which will sup... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers guide one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into place.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1109

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers guide one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into place. A tilt-up co... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a row of walls is erected as the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility takes shape.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1118

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a row of walls is erected as the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility takes shape. A tilt-up constr... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, steady progress is made by a team of construction workers to erect the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1119

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, steady progress is made by a team of construction workers to erect the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Ma... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into an upright position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1107

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into an upright position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is enlisted to lift the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1115

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is enlisted to lift the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into position. A ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is moving ahead with the placement of all of the outside walls complete.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1161

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is moving ahead with the placement of all of ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this crane raised all of the outside walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility over a period of two days.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1160

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this crane raised all of the outside walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility over a period o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1156

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place. Concrete la... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers survey the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1158

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers survey the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility. Conc... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, all of the exterior walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility have been lifted into place.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1157

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, all of the exterior walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility have been lifted into place. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the placement of the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, the "barn-raising" of the new "green" facility is complete.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1159

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the placement of the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, the "barn-rai... more

Footprint of Ontario Lacus

Footprint of Ontario Lacus

This image of Ontario Lacus, the largest lake on the southern hemisphere of Saturn moon Titan, was obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The lake surface appears dark because it is smooth. NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI

APOLLO 13 ASTRONAUT FRED HAISE CASTS FOOTPRINT AT USSRC DAVIDSON CENTER 1100338

APOLLO 13 ASTRONAUT FRED HAISE CASTS FOOTPRINT AT USSRC DAVIDSON CENTE...

APOLLO 13 ASTRONAUT FRED HAISE CASTS FOOTPRINT AT USSRC DAVIDSON CENTER

WAC Changing Footprint

WAC Changing Footprint

WAC Changing Footprint NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Enceladus Footprint on Saturn

Enceladus Footprint on Saturn

NASA Cassini spacecraft has spotted a glowing patch of ultraviolet light near Saturn north pole that marks the presence of an electrical circuit that connects Saturn with its moon Enceladus. NASA/JPL/University... more

A Northern Footprint

A Northern Footprint

A Northern Footprint NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Slidell, La., May 10, 2013 -- As a direct result of Hurricane Katrina, the Slidell Municipal Auditorium received up to four feet of flood waters, which led to damages throughout the facility. FEMA obligated $7 million for the replacement of the facility. Though the footprint of the new facility remains the same, the seating capacity has increased due to a redesign of the floor plan. The new facility will accommodate a standing crowd of 1,716, fixed row seating of 840 and table seating of 450. The auditorium is the final of all the city buildings destroyed by, and subsequently repaired following, Hurricane Katrina. Manuel Broussard/FEMA

Slidell, La., May 10, 2013 -- As a direct result of Hurricane Katrina,...

The original finding aid described this as: Date Taken: 2013-05-10 00:00:00 UTC Photographer Name: Manuel Broussard City/State: Slidell, LA Keywords: hurricane katrina ^ Slidell Municipal Auditorium Disast... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Employees turn out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Director of Center Operations Nancy Bray, at left, encourages the employees to join her in putting the trail to good use.    The one-mile-long track will provide employees with a safe place off Kennedy's roadways to walk or run. The more than 6 tons of green waste removed to create the trail's footprint will be mulched and used for cover at Kennedy's landfill. Approximately 1,594 tons of crawler fines -- ground-up crawler rock removed from the crawlerway in the Launch Complex 39 area -- was used for the foundation of the trail. Fitness equipment has been ordered and will be installed on a concrete slab at the trail's west end. After the equipment has been installed, the slab will be coated to provide a rubberized exercise pad. At Kennedy Space Center, the health and safety of every employee is paramount. To learn more about Kennedy, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy.  Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2025

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Employees turn out during their lunchtime for a...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Employees turn out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Flori... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of an exercise pad is underway beside the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The one-mile-long track will provide employees with a safe place off Kennedy's roadways to walk or run. The more than 6 tons of green waste removed to create the trail's footprint will be mulched and used for cover at Kennedy's landfill. Approximately 1,594 tons of crawler fines -- ground-up crawler rock removed from the crawlerway in the Launch Complex 39 area -- was used for the foundation of the trail. Fitness equipment has been ordered and will be installed on a concrete slab at the trail's west end. After the equipment has been installed, the slab will be coated to provide a rubberized exercise pad. At Kennedy Space Center, the health and safety of every employee is paramount. To learn more about Kennedy, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy.  Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2023

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of an exercise pad is underway bes...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of an exercise pad is underway beside the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The one-mile-long trac... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Director of Center Operations Nancy Bray welcomes the employees who turned out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The one-mile-long track will provide employees with a safe place off Kennedy's roadways to walk or run. The more than 6 tons of green waste removed to create the trail's footprint will be mulched and used for cover at Kennedy's landfill. Approximately 1,594 tons of crawler fines -- ground-up crawler rock removed from the crawlerway in the Launch Complex 39 area -- was used for the foundation of the trail. Fitness equipment has been ordered and will be installed on a concrete slab at the trail's west end. After the equipment has been installed, the slab will be coated to provide a rubberized exercise pad. At Kennedy Space Center, the health and safety of every employee is paramount. To learn more about Kennedy, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy.  Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2024

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Director of Center Operations Nancy Bray welcom...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Director of Center Operations Nancy Bray welcomes the employees who turned out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Dressed for a little exercise, Deputy Program Manager of Launch Services Chuck Dovale addresses the employees who have turned out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The one-mile-long track will provide employees with a safe place off Kennedy's roadways to walk or run. The more than 6 tons of green waste removed to create the trail's footprint will be mulched and used for cover at Kennedy's landfill. Approximately 1,594 tons of crawler fines -- ground-up crawler rock removed from the crawlerway in the Launch Complex 39 area -- was used for the foundation of the trail. Fitness equipment has been ordered and will be installed on a concrete slab at the trail's west end. After the equipment has been installed, the slab will be coated to provide a rubberized exercise pad. At Kennedy Space Center, the health and safety of every employee is paramount. To learn more about Kennedy, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy.  Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2026

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Dressed for a little exercise, Deputy Program M...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Dressed for a little exercise, Deputy Program Manager of Launch Services Chuck Dovale addresses the employees who have turned out during their lunchtime for a ribbon-cutting ceremony open... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Chuck Dovale, at left, deputy program manager of Launch Services, and Nancy Bray, director of Center Operations, cut a ribbon officially opening the new fitness trail next to the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The one-mile-long track will provide employees with a safe place off Kennedy's roadways to walk or run. The more than 6 tons of green waste removed to create the trail's footprint will be mulched and used for cover at Kennedy's landfill. Approximately 1,594 tons of crawler fines -- ground-up crawler rock removed from the crawlerway in the Launch Complex 39 area -- was used for the foundation of the trail. Fitness equipment has been ordered and will be installed on a concrete slab at the trail's west end. After the equipment has been installed, the slab will be coated to provide a rubberized exercise pad. At Kennedy Space Center, the health and safety of every employee is paramount. To learn more about Kennedy, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy.  Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2027

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Chuck Dovale, at left, deputy program manager o...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Chuck Dovale, at left, deputy program manager of Launch Services, and Nancy Bray, director of Center Operations, cut a ribbon officially opening the new fitness trail next to the Space St... more

[United States Capitol grounds, Washington, D.C. Site plan, footprint, landscaping]

[United States Capitol grounds, Washington, D.C. Site plan, footprint,...

Shows west terrace. Date 1825 per William Allen. Inscription on verso: Capitol. General Plan. Reference copy in LOT 4249 (R).

[United States Capitol grounds, Washington, D.C. Site plan, footprint, landscaping]

[United States Capitol grounds, Washington, D.C. Site plan, footprint,...

Shows west terrace. Date 1825 per William Allen. Inscription on verso: Capitol. General Plan. Reference copy in LOT 4249 (R).