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The Wright Brothers test fly their aircraft on Fort Myer's parade field. This series of test flights resulted in the Army purchasing its first aircraft. In the first flight, Sept. 9, 1908, Orville Wright kept the plane aloft 71 seconds. The second flight resulted in a crash that left Wright severely cut and bruised and his passenger, Army LT. Thomas Selfridge dead -- the first powered-aviation fatality. (Exact date shot UNKNOWN)

The Wright Brothers test fly their aircraft on Fort Myer's parade fiel...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Fort Myer, Arlington State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Pub... More

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. New Lockheed P-38 pursuit ships that have successfully passed inspection for routine test flights are transferred to the Lockheed air terminal. Here flight mechanics take over and prepare them for the flight test. These ships have performed beautifully in action, notably in the Aleutians. They are excellent high-altitude fighters and rank among the world's fastest combat aircraft. Their long-range and great firepower give promise of their value as escorts for high- altitude bombers

Production. Lockheed P-38 pursuit planes. New Lockheed P-38 pursuit sh...

Picryl description: Public domain image of a bomber aircraft, military aviation, air forces, free to use, no copyright restrictions.

aahs_p002130, US Navy Photogrpah

aahs_p002130, US Navy Photogrpah

Bell L-39 Experimental Aircraft, Showing test auxiliary instrument panel and camera installation aft of Pilot station.

XB-51 High Nose 1, US Air Force Photo

XB-51 High Nose 1, US Air Force Photo

NARA B26507..20 Sep 49 Public domain photograph of jet aircraft, free to use, no copyright restrictions image - Picryl description

B-50 Track Gear 4 - A black and white photo of a plane on a runway

B-50 Track Gear 4 - A black and white photo of a plane on a runway

NARA B26466..Jun 49 Public domain photograph of a bomber aircraft, free to use, no copyright restrictions image - Picryl description

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft and launch abort system were transported to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In the background are full-size replicas of the external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters that mark the entranceway to the new Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit. Crane operators and technicians practice de-stacking operations on mock-ups of Orion and the launch abort system in the Vehicle Assembly Building in order to keep processing procedures and skills current.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-2903

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a fu...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft and launch abort system were transported to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. In the backgro... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket ignites its first stage at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28. The Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall rocket produces 2.96 million pounds of thrust at liftoff and reaches a speed of 100 mph in eight seconds. This was the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/ George Roberts and Tony Gray KSC-2009-5968

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket ignites its first s...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket ignites its first stage at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28. The Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall roc... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Hangar AF on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers prepare to inspect the spent first stage of NASA's Ares I-X rocket, secured in a slip.  The booster was recovered by the solid rocket booster recovery ship Freedom Star after it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean following its flight test.    Liftoff of the 6-minute flight test was at 11:30 a.m. EDT Oct. 28. This was the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired.  The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Hangar AF on Cape Canaveral Air Force Statio...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Hangar AF on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers prepare to inspect the spent first stage of NASA's Ares I-X rocket, secured in a slip. The booster was recovered by t... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel listen to former space shuttle flight director and mission operations executive Milt Heflin during Orion recovery preparations aboard the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean. Heflin was on prime recovery ships during the splashdowns and post-landing activities of Apollo 8, 10, 16 and 17, each of the three Skylab missions and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. NASA and the U.S. Navy are preparing for recovery of the Orion crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4649

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel list...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel listen to former space shuttle flight director and mission operations executive Milt Heflin during Orion recovery preparations aboard the USS An... More

A U.S. Navy Tomahawk cruise missile flies by an isolated industrial complex during a flight test

A U.S. Navy Tomahawk cruise missile flies by an isolated industrial co...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mojave Desert State: California (CA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public C... More

S08-14-380 - STS-008 - Mission Specialist (MS) Thornton prepares to eat meal on middeck

S08-14-380 - STS-008 - Mission Specialist (MS) Thornton prepares to ea...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: On middeck, Mission Specialist (MS) Thornton holds meal tray assembly (ASSY) above MS seat positioned for Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 401 Fli... More

A US Army (USA) AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopter, armed with AGM-114 Hellfire air-to-ground missiles and 2.75-inch rocket pods hovers from a concealed position, during flight test conducted at the Boeing/McDonnell Douglas facility, located near Mesa, Arizona (AZ)

A US Army (USA) AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopter, armed with AGM-114 H...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mesa State: Arizona (AZ) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Lance Cheung, USAF Release Status: Released to Publ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X motor segment is revealed after removal of the rail car cover. It is one of four reusable motor segments and nozzle exit cone shipped by the Ares I first-stage prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc. for final processing and integration in the facility. The booster used for the Ares I-X launch is being modified by adding new forward structures and a fifth segment simulator. The motor is the final hardware needed for the rocket's upcoming flight test this summer. The stacking operations are scheduled to begin in the Vehicle Assembly Building in April. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2315

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X motor segment is revealed after removal of the rail car cover. It is one of four reu... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for a fit check.  Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2800

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Lau... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building's High Bay 3 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Development Flight Instrumentation, or DFI, is mounted on the interior wall of the upper stage simulator of the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket.  More than 700 sensors will gather data during the two-and-a-half minute flight test.    Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is the essential core of a space transportation system designed to carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/ares/flighttests/aresIx/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-5348

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building's High Bay 3 a...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building's High Bay 3 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Development Flight Instrumentation, or DFI, is mounted on the interior wall of the upper stage simulator ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The towering 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, newly arrived on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, confidently greats the day following its seven-hour early-morning trek.    The test rocket left the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:39 a.m. EDT on its 4.2-mile trek to the pad and was "hard down" on the pad’s pedestals at 9:17 a.m.  The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system.  Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5598

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The towering 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, new...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The towering 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, newly arrived on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, confidently greats the day following its seven-hour early-morning tr... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Spotlighted in brilliant white, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket emerges from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move to the launch pad, known as "rollout," began at 1:39 a.m. EDT.    The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system.  Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-5535

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Spotlighted in brilliant white, the 327-foot-ta...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Spotlighted in brilliant white, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket emerges from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move to the launch pad, known a... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As the sun rises over Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, secured to a mobile launcher platform, prepares to climb the five percent grade of the crawlerway to the top of the pad.    The test rocket left the Vehicle Assembly Building at 1:39 a.m. EDT on its 4.2-mile trek to the pad and was "hard down" on the pad’s pedestals at 9:17 a.m.  The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system.  Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5586

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As the sun rises over Launch Pad 39B at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – As the sun rises over Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, secured to a mobile launcher platform, prepares to climb the five percen... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Reflected in the water of the turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket begins its slow trek to Launch Pad 39B. The move, known as "rollout," began at 1:39 a.m. EDT. The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system.  Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-5530

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Reflected in the water of the turn basin near t...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Reflected in the water of the turn basin near the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket begins its slow trek to Launch Pad... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, from around the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, secured to a mobile launcher platform.  The RSS was opened at midday. Preparations are under way for a full test of the rocket, including a "hot fire" of the auxiliary power units as part of the integrated systems test.     The transfer of the pad from the Space Shuttle Program to the Constellation Program took place May 31. Modifications made to the pad include the removal of shuttle unique subsystems, such as the orbiter access arm and a section of the gaseous oxygen vent arm, along with the installation of three 600-foot lightning towers, access platforms, environmental control systems and a vehicle stabilization system.  Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I. The Ares I-X flight test is targeted for Oct. 27. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-5716

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida roll the rotating service structure, or RSS, from around the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket, secured to a mobile lau... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Sunset at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida finds the Ares I-X rocket awaiting the approaching liftoff of its flight test.    This is the first time since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired that a vehicle other than the space shuttle has occupied the pad.   Part of the Constellation Program, the Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I.  The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5841

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Sunset at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Sunset at Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida finds the Ares I-X rocket awaiting the approaching liftoff of its flight test. This is the first time since the Apoll... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a news conference is held in the Press Site auditorium following the conclusion of the flight test readiness review, or FTRR, for the Ares I-X test rocket. From left are Doug Cooke, associate administrator for NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate; Bob Ess, mission manager for the Ares I-X flight test; and Edward Mango, launch director for the Ares I-X flight test.    During the meeting, senior NASA and contractor managers assessed the risks associated with the test and determined the rocket, support systems and procedures are ready for launch.  The Ares I-X launch date was announced after the FTRR and is officially set for Oct. 27.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-5865

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a ne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a news conference is held in the Press Site auditorium following the conclusion of the flight test readiness review, or FTRR, for the Ares I-X t... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a launch status briefing for the Ares I-X rocket's flight test is held in the Press Site auditorium. From left are moderator George Diller, NASA Public Affairs officer; Jeff Spaulding, NASA test director for Ares I-X; and Kathy Winters, launch weather officer.    The team is not tracking any problems, the rocket is in great shape, and they are ready for liftoff from Launch Pad 39B on Oct. 27 at 8 a.m. EDT.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5866

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a la...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a launch status briefing for the Ares I-X rocket's flight test is held in the Press Site auditorium. From left are moderator George Diller, NASA... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The prime launch team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Young-Crippen Firing Room in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    This will be the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired.  The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-6091

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The prime launch team for the Ares I-X flight t...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The prime launch team for the Ares I-X flight test monitors the countdown from consoles in the Young-Crippen Firing Room in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Flo... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket flies high above Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28. NASA’s Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall rocket produces 2.96 million pounds of thrust at liftoff and reaches a speed of 100 mph in eight seconds. This was the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired. The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals. For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.Photo credit: NASA/ George Roberts and Tom Farrar KSC-2009-5972

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket flies high above La...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Ares I-X test rocket flies high above Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28. NASA’s Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall rocket produces 2... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Almost twice as tall as Disney's Cinderella Castle, the Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall Ares I-X test rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  The rocket produces 2.96 million pounds of thrust at liftoff and reaches a speed of 100 mph in eight seconds.    Liftoff of the 6-minute flight test was at 11:30 a.m. EDT Oct. 28. This was the first launch from Kennedy's pads of a vehicle other than the space shuttle since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired.  The parts used to make the Ares I-X booster flew on 30 different shuttle missions ranging from STS-29 in 1989 to STS-106 in 2000. The data returned from more than 700 sensors throughout the rocket will be used to refine the design of future launch vehicles and bring NASA one step closer to reaching its exploration goals.  For information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-5937

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Almost twice as tall as Disney's Cinderella Cas...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Almost twice as tall as Disney's Cinderella Castle, the Constellation Program's 327-foot-tall Ares I-X test rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Flor... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a post-launch news conference is held in the Press Site auditorium following the successful launch of the Ares I-X test rocket at 11:30 a.m. EDT Oct. 28. Sharing a lighter moment are, from left, Doug Cooke, associate administrator for NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate; Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program manager; Bob Ess, mission manager for the Ares I-X flight test; and Edward Mango, launch director for the Ares I-X flight test. For more information on the Ares I-X vehicle and flight test, visit http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-5956

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a po...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a post-launch news conference is held in the Press Site auditorium following the successful launch of the Ares I-X test rocket at 11:30 a.m. EDT... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module toward the base of a birdcage tool. The birdcage will be used to continue installation of external components in preparation for Orion’s first uncrewed test flight in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4892

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building at ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module t... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians and engineers monitor the progress as a crane is used to lift the Orion crew module from a special test stand. Lockheed Martin Space Systems and NASA engineers performed a series of static load tests on Orion that simulated the massive loads the spacecraft would experience during its mission.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight, Exploration Flight Test 1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2013-2671

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians and engineers monitor the progress as a crane is used to lift the Orion crew mo... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lifts the Orion crew module out of a special test stand. Lockheed Martin Space Systems and NASA engineers performed a series of static load tests on Orion that simulated the massive loads the spacecraft would experience during its mission.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight, Exploration Flight Test 1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2013-2673

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lifts the Orion crew module out of a special test stand. Lockheed Martin Space Syst... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians help secure the Orion crew module onto a work stand after a crane was used to lift it out of a special test. Lockheed Martin Space Systems and NASA engineers performed a series of static load tests on Orion that simulated the massive loads the spacecraft would experience during its mission.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight, Exploration Flight Test 1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2013-2682

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians help secure the Orion crew module onto a work stand after a crane was used to l... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician monitors de-stacking operations on a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft and launch abort system. Crane operators and technicians practice stacking and de-stacking operations in order to keep processing procedures and skills current.        Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-2850

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician monitors de-stacking operations on a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecr... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a mock-up of the Orion launch abort system has been lowered onto a transporter. Crane operators and technicians practice de-stacking operations on a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft and launch abort system in order to keep processing procedures and skills current.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-2856

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a mock-up of the Orion launch abort system has been lowered onto a transporter. Crane op... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of the media receive an on activities in NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program, Space Launch System and Orion crew module for Exploration Test Flight 1. Speaking to the media is Scott Wilson, manager of Orion Production Operations at Kennedy.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-2918

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of the media receive an on activities in NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Oper... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane operator lifts a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft high in the air for transfer to High Bay 4. Crane operators and technicians practice stacking and de-stacking operations in order to keep processing procedures and skills current for the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dan Casper KSC-2013-3053

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane operator lifts a full-size mock-up of the Orion spacecraft high in the air for t... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the launch abort system, or LAS, components are horizontally stacked as processing continues for the Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 mission. Components of the LAS are the launch abort motor, the attitude control motor, the jettison motor and the fairing.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The LAS is designed to safely pull the Orion crew module away from the launch vehicle in the event of an emergency on the launch pad or during the initial ascent of NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, rocket. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on the SLS rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-3797

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the launch abort system, or LAS, components are horizontally stacked as processing continues for the Ori... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the launch abort system, or LAS, components are horizontally stacked as processing continues for the Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 mission. Components of the LAS are the launch abort motor, the attitude control motor, the jettison motor and the fairing.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The LAS is designed to safely pull the Orion crew module away from the launch vehicle in the event of an emergency on the launch pad or during the initial ascent of NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, rocket. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on the SLS rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2013-3798

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the launch abort system, or LAS, components are horizontally stacked as processing continues for the Ori... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician monitors the progress as the Project Morpheus Prototype Lander is loaded with propellant at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Morpheus is being prepared for a dress rehearsal of a tethered flight test. Testing of the prototype lander was performed at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston in preparation for tethered and free flight testing at Kennedy.    The landing facility will provide the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus utilizes an autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, payload that will allow it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2013-4228

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a te...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician monitors the progress as the Project Morpheus Prototype Lander is loaded with propellant at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Fa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the heat shield for the agency's Orion spacecraft arrived aboard the Super Guppy aircraft. The largest of its kind ever built, the heat shield is planned for installation on the Orion crew module in March next year. The Orion spacecraft is scheduled to make its first unpiloted flight test, Exploration Flight Test-1 EFT-1, in September 2014.      The Orion spacecraft is designed to meet requirements for traveling beyond low-Earth orbit. The spacecraft will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry crews to space, sustain the astronauts during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nasher KSC-2013-4240

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the heat shield for the agency's Orion spacecraft arrived aboard the Super Guppy aircraft. The largest of its ki... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the heat shield for the agency's Orion spacecraft is being offloaded from the Super Guppy aircraft. The largest of its kind ever built, the heat shield is planned for installation on the Orion crew module in March of next year. The Orion spacecraft is scheduled to make its first unpiloted flight test, Exploration Flight Test-1 EFT-1, in September 2014.    The Orion spacecraft is designed to meet requirements for traveling beyond low-Earth orbit. The spacecraft will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry crews to space, sustain the astronauts during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space. For more information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nasher KSC-2013-4249

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the heat shield for the agency's Orion spacecraft is being offloaded from the Super Guppy aircraft. The largest ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Preparations are underway to prepare the Project Morpheus prototype lander for a second free flight test at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Testing of the prototype lander was performed at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston in preparation for tethered and free flight testing at Kennedy. Project Morpheus integrates NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, with an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces.    The landing facility will provide the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov.  Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-4367

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Preparations are underway to prepare the Proje...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Preparations are underway to prepare the Project Morpheus prototype lander for a second free flight test at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center i... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians on scissor lifts and those stationed on the floor work on the installation of the second of three fairings on the service module for the Orion spacecraft.      The Orion spacecraft is being prepared for its first unpiloted flight test, Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, scheduled for launch atop a Delta IV rocket in September 2014. The Orion spacecraft is designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion is scheduled to launch atop NASA’s Space Launch System rocket in 2017. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-4481

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians on scissor lifts and those stationed on the floor work on the installation of t... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The Orion boilerplate test vehicle has been secured in the crew module recovery cradle and raised up at a warehouse at the Naval Base San Diego in California. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy are evaluating the hardware and processes for preparing the Orion crew module for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, for overland transport from the naval base to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2577

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The Orion boilerplate test vehicle has been secure...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The Orion boilerplate test vehicle has been secured in the crew module recovery cradle and raised up at a warehouse at the Naval Base San Diego in California. The Ground Systems Development ... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Inside a protective structure at the Mole Pier at the Naval Base San Diego in California, workers prepare for a simulated fit check of the hatch cover on the Orion boilerplate test vehicle. The test vehicle is secured on the crew module recovery cradle. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Navy are evaluating the hardware and processes for preparing the Orion crew module for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, for overland transport from the naval base to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2586

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Inside a protective structure at the Mole Pier at ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Inside a protective structure at the Mole Pier at the Naval Base San Diego in California, workers prepare for a simulated fit check of the hatch cover on the Orion boilerplate test vehicle. ... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Workers prepare to assemble the crew module transportation fixture for the Orion boilerplate test vehicle at the Mole Pier at Naval Base San Diego in California. The test vehicle will be moved from the pier to a warehouse at the naval base. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Navy are evaluating the hardware and processes for preparing the Orion crew module for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, for overland transport from the naval base to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2591

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Workers prepare to assemble the crew module transp...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Workers prepare to assemble the crew module transportation fixture for the Orion boilerplate test vehicle at the Mole Pier at Naval Base San Diego in California. The test vehicle will be mov... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander as it lifts off on the first free flight test at night from a launch pad at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 98-second test began at 10:02 p.m. EDT with the Morpheus lander launching from the ground over a flame trench and ascending more than 800 feet. The vehicle, with its autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT sensors, surveyed the hazard field to determine safe landing sites. Morpheus then flew forward and downward covering approximately 1,300 feet while performing a 78-foot divert to simulate a hazard avoidance maneuver. The lander then descended and landed on a dedicated pad inside the test field. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s ALHAT and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, which are green propellants. These new capabilities could be used in future efforts to deliver cargo to planetary surfaces.    The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2717

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander as it lifts off on the first free flight test at night from a launch pad at the north end of the S... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor conditions in preparation for the first free flight test at night of NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander from a launch pad at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 98-second test began at 10:02 p.m. EDT with the Morpheus lander launching from the ground over a flame trench and ascending more than 800 feet. The vehicle, with its autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT sensors, surveyed the hazard field to determine safe landing sites. Morpheus then flew forward and downward covering approximately 1,300 feet while performing a 78-foot divert to simulate a hazard avoidance maneuver. The lander then descended and landed on a dedicated pad inside the test field. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s ALHAT and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, which are green propellants. These new capabilities could be used in future efforts to deliver cargo to planetary surfaces.    The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2713

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Engineers in the Morpheus Control Room monitor conditions in preparation for the first free flight test at night of NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander from a launch pad at the nort... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers attach the heat shield to the Orion crew module inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1. The flight test will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2830

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers atta...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers attach the heat shield to the Orion crew module inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA and Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion service module into the Final Assembly and System Testing, or FAST, cell. The Orion crew module will be stacked on the service module in the FAST cell and then both modules will be put through their final system tests for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, before rolling out of the facility for integration with the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2014-2861

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hi...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA and Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians monitor the progress as a crane lowers ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2956

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark th...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Build... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technicians attaches the middle back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-3476

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technicians attaches the middle back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module. Prepara... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits line up the middle back shell tile panel for installation on the Orion crew module. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-3482

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits line up the middle back shell tile panel for instal... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is used to carry a back shell tile panel for installation on the Orion crew module. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-3486

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is used to carry a back shell tile panel for installation on the Orion crew module.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits install a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew module. Preparations are underway for Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-3489

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians dressed in clean-room suits install a back shell tile panel onto the Orion crew... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians dressed in clean-room suits work on the back shell tile panels on the Orion crew module. Preparations are underway for Orion's first flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion's first flight test is scheduled to launch in December atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Gianni Woods KSC-2014-4401

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians dressed in clean-room suits work on the back she... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cover for the Orion crew module. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4199

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cov... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being moved along the center aisle. Orion will be transferred to a mating device.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3765

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. The stack has been lowered onto the mating device on a stand. Technicians are attaching the stack to the mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3778

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane slowly lifts the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 out of the test cell. Orion will be transferred to a mating device.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3761

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane slowly lifts the Orion crew and ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a ceremony inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jules Schneider, at right, Lockheed Martin Orion Production Operations manager, presents the key to symbolically turn over the Orion spacecraft for Exploration Flight Test-1 to Ground Operations. Accepting the key is Blake Hale, Lockheed Martin Ground Operations manager.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in December to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-3785

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a ceremony inside the Neil Armstrong Ope...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a ceremony inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Jules Schneider, at right, Lockheed Martin Orion Productio... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion crew module, stacked atop its service module, is transported into the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where it will be fueled ahead of its December flight. The spacecraft for Exploration Flight Test-1 was moved out of the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-3849

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion crew module, stacked atop its service...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion crew module, stacked atop its service module, is transported into the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where it will be fueled ahe... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is installed around the spacecraft and Launch Abort System. The Ogive panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4399

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is ins... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4380

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, members of the news media are briefed on the upcoming Orion flight test. From left are: Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs, Bill Hill, NASA deputy associate administrator for Exploration Systems Development, Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager, Bryan Austin, Lockheed Martin mission manager, Jeremy Graeber, Operations Integration Branch of Ground Systems Development and Operations at Kennedy, and Ron Fortson, United Launch Alliance director of Mission Management. Mike Sarafin, NASA's lead flight director, participated by video from the Johnson Space Center.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4, 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4387

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site audito...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, members of the news media are briefed on the upcoming Orion flight test. From left are: Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs, Bill Hill, ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, members of the news media are briefed on the upcoming Orion flight test by Ron Fortson, United Launch Alliance director of Mission Management.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4, 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4394

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site audito...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Kennedy Space Center’s Press Site auditorium, members of the news media are briefed on the upcoming Orion flight test by Ron Fortson, United Launch Alliance director of Mission Man... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 37, United Launch Alliance engineers and technicians prepare to lift the agency's Orion spacecraft for mounting atop its Delta IV Heavy rocket.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4, 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Radislav Sinyak KSC-2014-4458

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Co...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 37, United Launch Alliance engineers and technicians prepare to lift the agency's Orion spacecraft for mounting atop its Delta IV Heav... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment for use during an alternate recovery method of the Orion crew module after its first flight test, if needed, is lowered by crane onto the deck of the USNS Salvor, a salvage ship, at Naval Base San Diego in California. Before launch of Orion on a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel will head out to sea in the USS Anchorage and the USNS Salvor and wait for splashdown of the Orion crew module in the Pacific Ocean.      The GSDO Program will lead the recovery efforts. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-4519

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment for use during an alterna...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment for use during an alternate recovery method of the Orion crew module after its first flight test, if needed, is lowered by crane onto the deck of the USNS Salvor, a ... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment is being loaded into the well deck of the USS Anchorage at Naval Base San Diego in California. The equipment will be used during recovery of the Orion crew module after its first flight test. Before launch of Orion on a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel will head out to sea in the USS Anchorage and the USNS Salvor, a salvage ship, and wait for splashdown of the Orion crew module in the Pacific Ocean.    The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program will lead the recovery efforts. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2014-4527

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment is being loaded into the ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Ground support equipment is being loaded into the well deck of the USS Anchorage at Naval Base San Diego in California. The equipment will be used during recovery of the Orion crew module af... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – With access doors at Space Launch Complex 37 opened, the Orion and Delta IV Heavy stack is visible in its entirety inside the Mobile Service Tower where the vehicle is undergoing launch preparations. Orion will make its first flight test on Dec. 4 with a morning launch atop the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy. The spacecraft will orbit the Earth twice, including one loop that will reach 3,600 miles above Earth. No one will be aboard Orion for this flight test, but the spacecraft is being designed and built to carry astronauts to deep space destinations such as an asteroid. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4571

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – With access doors at Space Launch Complex 37 op...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – With access doors at Space Launch Complex 37 opened, the Orion and Delta IV Heavy stack is visible in its entirety inside the Mobile Service Tower where the vehicle is undergoing launch p... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 salute Rear Admiral Fernandez L. "Frank" Ponds, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3, during his visit on the deck of the USS Anchorage near Naval Base San Diego in California. The ship is heading out to sea in the Pacific Ocean. NASA and the U.S. Navy are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4611

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 sal...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 salute Rear Admiral Fernandez L. "Frank" Ponds, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3, during his visit on the deck of the USS Anchorage near... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion, pilots in two H60-S Seahawk helicopters practice take-off and search from the deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing to recover the Orion crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes after the spacecraft's return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4678

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion, pilots in two H60-S Seahawk helicopters practice take-off and search from the deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean about 600... More

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the USNS Salvor is in the Pacific Ocean, nearby the USS Anchorage, about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. The Salvor will be used to recover Orion in the event that the spacecraft cannot be recovered using the well deck of the USS Anchorage. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes after the spacecraft's return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4680

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the USNS Salvor is in the Pacific Ocean, nearby the USS Anchorage, about 600 miles off the c... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph and Kevin O'Connell KSC-2014-4760

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/ Sandy Joseph/Kevin O’Connell KSC-2014-4743

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4709

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4710

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph KSC-2014-4742

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. Photo credit: NASA/George Roberts KSC-2014-4726

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/ Sandy Joseph/Kevin O’Connell KSC-2014-4752

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4706

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space L...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit.... More

F-35C Conducts 1st Operational Test of Live-fire AIM-120 Missile

F-35C Conducts 1st Operational Test of Live-fire AIM-120 Missile

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (Jan. 24, 2019) U.S. Navy Lt. Daniel "Crib" Armenteros, piloting an F-35C Lightning II assigned to Naval Air Station China Lake's Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Nine (VX-9), con... More

Master Sgt. Allen Clutter, a flight engineer attached

Master Sgt. Allen Clutter, a flight engineer attached

Master Sgt. Allen Clutter, a flight engineer attached to 514th Flight Test Squadron, inspects the propellers while performing a pre-flight functional flight check on a U.S. Navy C-130 Hercules April 11, 2019 at... More

An F-16D Fighting Falcon assigned to the 40th Flight

An F-16D Fighting Falcon assigned to the 40th Flight

An F-16D Fighting Falcon assigned to the 40th Flight Test Squadron flies a training mission off the Emerald Coast of FLa. April 3 2019. The 40FLTS mission is to execute exceptional fighter developmental test an... More

A U.S. Air Force F-16C Falcon from the 96th Test Wing

A U.S. Air Force F-16C Falcon from the 96th Test Wing

A U.S. Air Force F-16C Falcon from the 96th Test Wing prepares for in-flight refueling from a 155th Air Refueling Wing KC-135 Stratotanker during exercise Emerald Flag over the Gulf of Mexico, Dec. 3, 2020. Mor... More

04-02025 Ryan X-13 Vertijet c. 1955

04-02025 Ryan X-13 Vertijet c. 1955

Ryan X-13 Vertijet ..Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive ( http://www.sandiegoairandspace.org/library/stillimages.html )

Curtiss-Wright : X-100, Space and Aviation museum SDASM

Curtiss-Wright : X-100, Space and Aviation museum SDASM

Catalog #: 00065057.Manufacturer: Curtiss-Wright.Designation: X-100.Official Nickname: .Notes: VTOL.Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive ( http://www.sandiegoairandspace.org/library/stillimages.html )

McDonnell F-15A 71-0287 NASA 835 HIDEC test engine run [NASA via RJF]

McDonnell F-15A 71-0287 NASA 835 HIDEC test engine run [NASA via RJF]

PictionID:43263383 - Title:McDonnell F-15A 71-0287 NASA 835 HIDEC test engine run [NASA via RJF] - Catalog:17_000312 - Filename:17_000312.tif - ---------Image from the René Francillon Photo Archive. Having had ... More

Ryan, X-13, Vertijet, US Air Force Photo

Ryan, X-13, Vertijet, US Air Force Photo

Catalog #: 01_00090288.Manufacturer: Ryan.Official Nickname: Vertijet.Designation: X-13.Notes: USA.Title: Ryan, X-13, Vertijet.Tags: Ryan, X-13, Vertijet, USA.Repository: San Diego Air and Space Museum Archive ... More

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 8, Operations & Flight Test Building, Northeast corner of Tenth & C Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 8, Operations & Flig...

Significance: Building 8, the Operations and Flight Test Building, was an integral part of Wright Field's World War II expansion. At this time ti housed the newly formed Flight Test Division, and also Wright F... More

aahs_p002129, US Navy Photogrpah

aahs_p002129, US Navy Photogrpah

Bell L-39 Experimental Aircraft showing Ventral Fin Installation. Public domain photograph of experimental aircraft, prototype, aviation design and development, no copyright restrictions image - Picryl description