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Topic: eyharts

1999
1999
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2008
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2008
203 media by topicpage 1 of 3
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1144

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1146

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate cla...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1145

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. And... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters KSC-99pp1143

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. ... more

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1148

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members...

On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activit... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1155

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 199...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttl... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1149

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) ...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the ta... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1150

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FR... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1157

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as th... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1154

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the a...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awarenes... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1147

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronau...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlant... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1156

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the cur... more

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1153

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about t...

Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for trai... more

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1152

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shut...

The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activiti... more

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1151

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut cand...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for trainin... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1160

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment du... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment d... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1161

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment du... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1158

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, in... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1162

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equip... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1159

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in tra... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1172

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During t... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes KSC-99pp1171

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot... more

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston --  JSC2000-01694-- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, flight engineer representing the European Space Agency, or ESA. KSC-07pd3282

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston -- JSC2000-01694-- Astronaut Leopold Ey...

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston -- JSC2000-01694-- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, flight engineer representing the European Space Agency, or ESA.

Official portrait of Leopold Eyharts

Official portrait of Leopold Eyharts

JSC2000-01694 (Feb 2000) --- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, 1998 ASCAN/mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA).

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts familiarize themselves with hardware and modules to be flown on upcoming shuttle flights.  Seen here are Leopold Eyharts and Peggy Whitson.  With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0296

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts familiarize themselves with hardware and modules to be flown on upcoming shuttle flights. Seen here are Leopold Eyharts and P... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, (left to right) astronauts Dan Tani, Leopold Eyharts, Koichi Wakata and Peggy Whitson study hardware for an upcoming shuttle flight. With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, (left to right) astronauts Dan Tani, Leopold Eyharts, Koichi Wakata and Peggy Whitson study hardware for an upcoming shuttle flight. With... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts Garrett Reisman, Peggy Whitson and Leopold Eyharts look at one of the modules being processed there.  The hardware will be flown on an upcoming shuttle flight.  With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0307

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts Garrett Reisman, Peggy Whitson and Leopold Eyharts look at one of the modules being processed there. The hardware will be flow... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts get data on the space station module they are in.  At left is Leopold Eyharts; at right is Dan Tani and Peggy Whitson.  With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facil...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts get data on the space station module they are in. At left is Leopold Eyharts; at right is Dan Tani and Peggy Whitson. With... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts look at one end of a module being processed for the International Space Station.  Accompanied by technicians, at far left is Leopold Eyharts; at far right is Peggy Whitson.  With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronauts look at one end of a module being processed for the International Space Station. Accompanied by technicians, at far left is Le... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-122 crew portrait.  From the left (front row) are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; the European Space Agency's, or ESA's, Leopold Eyharts; and Alan G. Poindexter, pilot.  From the left (back row) are astronauts Leland D. Melvin, Rex J. Walheim, Stanley G. Love and ESA's Hans Schlegel, all mission specialists.  Eyharts will join Expedition 16 in progress to serve as a flight engineer aboard the International Space Station.  The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. KSC-07pd3279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS122-S-002 -- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-122 crew portrait. From the left (front row) are astronauts Stephen N. Frick, commander; the... more

Official Portrait of Astronaut Leopold Eyharts

Official Portrait of Astronaut Leopold Eyharts

JSC2007-E-098981 (24 April 2007) --- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA)

ISS016-S-002F (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows the variety of crewmembers who will occupy the International Space Station during Expedition 16. Astronaut Peggy Whitson (front row, right), station commander; and Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (front row, left), flight engineer and Soyuz commander, will join NASA astronaut Clay Anderson (back row, left), flight engineer, in October after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft. Anderson will be replaced in October by astronaut Dan Tani (back row, second from left), flight engineer, who will yield his place in December to Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency (back row, third from left). Eyharts will be replaced in February 2008 by astronaut Garrett Reisman (back row, far right), flight engineer. iss016-s-002f

ISS016-S-002F (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows the variety of ...

ISS016-S-002F (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows the variety of crewmembers who will occupy the International Space Station during Expedition 16. Astronaut Peggy Whitson (front row, right), station comman... more

ISS016-S-002E (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, with Russia's Federal Space Agency  cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (left), flight engineer and Soyuz commander; and astronaut Garrett Reisman, flight engineer. Reisman will arrive on the station in February 2008 to replace Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency, who arrives in December. Whitson and Malenchenko, two veterans of previous International Space Station flights, are scheduled to launch to the complex in the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in October for a six-month mission. iss016-s-002e

ISS016-S-002E (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy...

ISS016-S-002E (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, with Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (left), flight engineer and Soyuz commande... more

ISS016-S-002D (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander; with Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (right), flight engineer and Soyuz commander, and the European Space Agency's Leopold Eyharts, flight engineer. Eyharts will arrive on the station in December to replace Dan Tani of NASA, who arrives in October. Whitson and Malenchenko, two veterans of previous International Space Station flights, are scheduled to launch to the complex in the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in October for a six-month mission. iss016-s-002d

ISS016-S-002D (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy...

ISS016-S-002D (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander; with Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (right), flight engineer and Soyuz commande... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at some of the equipment for the mission.  From left, in the foreground, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Rex Walheim and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  In the background at left is Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; at right is European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will be on the mission and joining the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station.   The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization.  The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2653

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members get a close look at some of the equipment for the mission. From left, in the foreground, are Mission Specialists Stanley Lo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis.  The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency.  A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2660

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members are introduced to part of the LESS.  From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, Commander Stephen Frick, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin and Pilot Alan Poindexter.   The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.  Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2616

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members are introduced to part of the LESS. From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and European Space Agency... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis.  The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency.  A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2658

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission.  Holding the camera is astronaut Leopold Eyharts, with the European Space Agency.  He will be joining the Expedition 15 crew on the International Space Station.  The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.  Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.  The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2643

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, memb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew practice handling cameras that will be used during the mission. Holding the camera is astronaut Leopold Eyharts, wi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who represents the European Space Agency, tries on a harness in the Orbiter Processing Facility.  Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer. The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.  Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2606

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who represent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who represents the European Space Agency, tries on a harness in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space St... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members stand next to the space shuttle Atlantis, which is being processed for launch on STS-122.  From left are European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who also represents ESA.  Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer.  The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.  Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2614

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 crew members stand next to the space shuttle Atlantis, which is being processed for launch on STS-122. From left are European Space Age... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices working with equipment for the mission.  In the background, at right, is European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who will be on the mission and joining the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station.  The crew is at Kennedy Space Center to take part in a crew equipment interface test, which includes equipment familiarization.  The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2649

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-122 Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices working with equipment for the mission. In the background, at right, is European Space Agency ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a lower level in the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew check out the landing gear on space shuttle Atlantis, overhead.  Dressed in their blue suits are Mission Specialist Leland Melvin, Commander Stephen Frick, European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  Eyharts will be traveling to the International Space Station to join the Expedition 16 crew as a flight engineer.  The crew is at Kennedy to take part in a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which helps familiarize them with equipment and payloads for the mission.  Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2611

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a lower level in the Orbiter Proces...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From a lower level in the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the STS-122 crew check out the landing gear on space shuttle Atlantis, overhead. Dressed in their blue suits are ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis.  The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, who represents the European Space Agency.  A seventh astronaut is Leopold Eyharts, also with the ESA, who will join the Expedition 16 crew as flight engineer on the International Space Station. The mission will carry and install the Columbus Lab,  a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications. It is Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station and will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment.  STS-122 is targeted for launch in December.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd2659

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 crew members get a close look at shuttle equipment from inside the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. The crew comprises six astronauts: Commander Stephen Frick, Pil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, of the European Space Agency, talks to the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following his arrival to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3332

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, of the European Space Agency, talks to the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following hi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Commander Steve Frick, at the microphone, addresses the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following his arrival to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. Other STS-122 crew members are, from left, Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16; Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3326

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Commande...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Commander Steve Frick, at the microphone, addresses the media at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility following his arrival to participat... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities.  From left are Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16; Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick.  The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3333

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space sh...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to parti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to participate in three days of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities. STS-122 Launch Director Doug Lyons greets Mission Specialist Leland Melvin as Commander Steve Frick and Pilot Alan Poindexter look on.  Disembarking are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts, a European Space Agency astronaut who will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3325

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space sh...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The astronauts assigned to the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrive at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a Gulfstream shuttle training aircraft to parti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Members of the STS-122 crew receive a briefing inside an M-113 armored personnel carrier near Launch Pad 39B.  An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch.  Seated on the bench at left is European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, the backup for STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts.  Seated on the bench at right, from back to front are Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3335

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-122 crew receive a b...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of the STS-122 crew receive a briefing inside an M-113 armored personnel carrier near Launch Pad 39B. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the ev... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne takes time out from driving practice of the M-113 armored personnel carrier to pose for a photo.  De Winne is the backup for STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3342

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- European Space Agency astronaut Frank D...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne takes time out from driving practice of the M-113 armored personnel carrier to pose for a photo. De Winne is the backup for STS-122... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B during a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier.  An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch.  From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, Stanley Love; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialist Leland Melvin.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3334

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group port...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B during a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier. An M-113 will be available to t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency, in front, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor, in the helmet beside him, monitors his performance.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. In back from left, former astronaut Jerry Ross, chief of the Vehicle Integration Test Office at NASA Johnson Space Center, and STS-122 Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love (standing) and Hans Schlegel of the European Space Agency, are along for the ride. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3350

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency, in front, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor, in the helmet beside him... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-122 Commander Stephen Frick, at right, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as an instructor, at left, monitors his performance.  European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, the backup for STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, rides in back.  The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch. The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3337

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Commander Stephen Frick, at rig...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Commander Stephen Frick, at right, practices driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as an instructor, at left, monitors his performance. European Space Agency astrona... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter, at right, seems to enjoy driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor behind him monitors his performance.  European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne, at left, the backup for STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts, is along for the ride.  The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3339

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter, at right...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Pilot Alan Poindexter, at right, seems to enjoy driving an M-113 armored personnel carrier as the instructor behind him monitors his performance. European Space Agency as... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B following a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier.  An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the pad before their launch.  From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Stanley Love; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Leopold Eyharts and Hans Schlegel.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3351

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group port...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait near Launch Pad 39B following a training session on the operation of the M-113 armored personnel carrier. An M-113 will be available t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts takes time out from driving practice of the M-113 armored personnel carrier to pose for a photo as Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel, behind him on the left, prepares to ride along.  Both Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency, but Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission. The practice near Launch Pad 39B is part of training on emergency egress procedures. An M-113 will be available to transport the crew to safety in the event of a contingency on the pad before their launch.  The crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3349

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts takes time out from driving practice of the M-113 armored personnel carrier to pose for a photo as Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel, beh... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew members listen to an instructor explain space shuttle emergency exit procedures.  From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, Leland Melvin and Leopold Eyharts.  Pilot Alan Poindexter and Commander Steve Frick are standing behind them.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3382

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew members listen to an instructor explain space shuttle emergency exit procedures. From left a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group photo following a press conference.  From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3380

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Laun...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group photo following a press conference. From left are Commander Steve Fri... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew pauses for a photo. Standing, from left, are Pilot Alan Poindexter, Commander Steve Frick and Mission Specialist Leland Melvin.  Kneeling, center, is Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel.  In the bottom row, from left, are Stanley Love, Rex Walheim and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3381

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Gathered in the white room on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew pauses for a photo. Standing, from left, are Pilot Alan Poindexter, Commander Steve Frick and... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Stanley Love.  Eyharts is with the European Space Agency and will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3384

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A.  Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, from left, Mission Specialist Leland Melvin; astronaut Frank De Winne of the European Space Agency, backup for Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Leopold Eyharts; Mission Specialist Stanley Love; and Commander Steve Frick listen intently to their trainer.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3398

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A. Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, from left, Mission Speciali... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A.  Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Hans Schlegel, both with the European Space Agency, and Pilot Alan Poindexter give their full attention to their trainer.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3397

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on the emergency exit system on Launch Pad 39A. Inside the bunker at the foot of the pad, Mission Specialists Leopold... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  From left, Mission Specialists Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin gain first-hand experience inside one of the baskets.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3394

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Fr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts takes part in a press conference at the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A.  Eyharts is with the European Space Agency and will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3377

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts takes part in a press conference at the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A. Eyharts is with the European... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media.  From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim (with the microphone), Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3378

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Laun...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan P... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick, with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.    The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3386

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Fr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Here, Mission Specialist Rex Walheim practices getting out of one of the baskets as Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin steady it.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3395

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. He... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media.  From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel (with the microphone), Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Laun...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan P... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Standing, from left, are Mission Specialists Stanley Love; Leopold Eyharts' backup, Frank De Winne; and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  Standing in the basket, from left, are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Leland Melvin and Rex Walheim. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to a safe landing site below, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.    The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3387

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. St... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Seen here near the catch nets in the landing zone are, from left, Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel and Rex Walheim; Commander Steve Frick; Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leland Melvin; and Pilot Alan Poindexter.  Seven slidewire baskets are available to carry the crew from the level of the pad's Orbiter Access Arm to this landing site, if needed.  Each basket can hold up to three people. A braking system catch net and drag chain slow, and then halt, the baskets as they travel down the wire at approximately 55 miles per hour. The journey takes about half a minute.  A bunker is located in the landing zone 1,200 feet west of the pad, with an M-113 armored personnel carrier stationed nearby.   The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3392

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on slidewire basket operation, part of the emergency exit system on the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Se... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media.  From left are Commander Steve Frick (with the microphone); Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3372

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Laun...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the slidewire basket landing on Launch Pad 39A, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew responds to questions from the media. From left are Commander Steve Frick (with the mic... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait at Launch Pad 39A as Atlantis undergoes final preparations for launch behind them.  From left are Mission Specialists Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; Commander Steve Frick; and Mission Specialists Stanley Love and Leopold Eyharts.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization, emergency egress training and a simulated launch countdown. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3371

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait at Launch Pad 39A as Atlantis undergoes final preparations for launch behind them. From left are Mission Specia... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A.  Clockwise, from left, are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts and Stanley Love, Eyharts' backup Frank De Winne, Mission Specialists Leland Melvin and Hans Schlegel, Pilot Alan Poindexter, Commander Steve Frick and Mission Specialist Rex Walheim with his back to the camera. Schlegel, Eyharts and De Winne are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.    The STS-122 crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to take part in terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities, a standard part of launch preparations. The TCDT provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown before launch. On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the European Space Agency's Columbus module to the International Space Station.  Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony, and will expand the research facilities aboard the station. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3385

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew receives instruction on emergency exit from the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left, are Mission Specialists L... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait with the tip of Atlantis' external tank in the background following a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love and Hans Schlegel.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3451

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait with the tip of Atlantis' external tank in the background following a simulated launch countdown at Launc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrives at Launch Pad 39A, dressed in launch and entry suits, to participate in a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis.  From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, Leopold Eyharts and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3422

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew arrives at Launch Pad 39A, dressed in launch and entry suits, to participate in a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis. From left ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts awaits adjustments to his helmet, part of his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters.  A European Space Agency astronaut, Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3406

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts awaits adjustments to his helmet, part of his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters. A European Spac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew leaves the Operations and Checkout Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A aboard the astronaut van.  From left are Mission Specialists Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Leland Melvin, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.    The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3418

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew leaves the Operations and Checkout Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A aboard the astronaut ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait in front of the astronaut van as they leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim, and Leland Melvin; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3419

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew poses for a group portrait in front of the astronaut van as they leave the Operations and Checkout... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts talks to the suit technician helping him put on his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters.  A European Space Agency astronaut, Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.  The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3402

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts talks to the suit technician helping him put on his launch and entry suit, in astronaut crew quarters. A Europea... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, suit technicians help space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts with his flight and entry suit before his entry onto Atlantis' flight deck, through the hatch behind him.  Eyharts is with the European Space Agency and will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd3429

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, su...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, suit technicians help space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts with his flight and entry suit before his entry onto A... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait in front of Atlantis' external tank following a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A.  From left are Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin; Commander Steve Frick; Pilot Alan Poindexter; and Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love and Hans Schlegel.  Schlegel and Eyharts are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3452

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Members of space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 crew pose for a group portrait in front of Atlantis' external tank following a simulated launch countdown at Launch Pad 39A. From left ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39A.  Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.    The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3417

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building for their ride to Launch Pad 39A. Clockwise, from left... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, left, and Stanley Love are strapped into their seats on Atlantis' fight deck during a simulated launch countdown.  Eyharts is with the European Space Agency and will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The exercise is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Atlantis' launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3438

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, left, and Stanley Love are strapped into their seats on Atlantis' fight deck during a simulated launch countdow... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew greet the media and employees on hand to cheer them on as the leave the Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Pad 39A.  Clockwise, from left front, are Pilot Alan Poindexter; Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Stanley Love, Leopold Eyharts, Hans Schlegel, and Rex Walheim; and Commander Steve Frick.  Eyharts and Schlegel are with the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 16 following the STS-122 mission.   The STS-122 crew is preparing for a simulated launch countdown aboard Atlantis, part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT is a dress rehearsal for launch and also provides astronauts and ground crews with equipment familiarization and emergency egress training.  On mission STS-122, Atlantis will deliver the Columbus module to the International Space Station. The European Space Agency's largest single contribution to the station, Columbus is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to U.S. Node 2, called Harmony. The laboratory will expand the research facilities aboard the station, providing crew members and scientists from around the world the ability to conduct a variety of experiments in the physical, materials and life sciences. Launch is targeted for Dec. 6.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3416

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Dressed in their launch and entry suits, the space shuttle Atlantis STS-122 crew greet the media and employees on hand to cheer them on as the leave the Operations and Checkout Bu... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman practices with tools that will be used on the mission.  He and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts.  The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3572

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman practices with tools that will be used on the mission. He and other crew members are at NASA's Kenne... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members are lowered into space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay to check out the equipment.  At right is Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman; at left is Mission Specialist Takao Doi.  The crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Doi represents the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3566

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members are lowered into space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay to check out the equipment. At right is Mission Specialist Garrett... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman practice with tools that will be used on the mission.  They and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3571

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman practice with tools that will be used on the mission. They and other cr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --     In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members examine one of the cameras that will be used on the mission.  From left are Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman, Richard Linnehan and Michael Foreman.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. These and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3564A

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members examine one of the cameras that will be used on the mission. From left are Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman, Richar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members are lowered into space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay to check out the equipment.  At right is Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman; at left is Mission Specialist Takao Doi.  The crew is at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Doi represents the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3565

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members are lowered into space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay to check out the equipment. At right is Mission Specialist Garrett... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman practice with tools that will be used on the mission.  They and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3570

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman practice with tools that will be used on the mission. They and other c... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members get a close look at equipment for the mission.  Seen are Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman, who will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts.  They and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.   The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3568

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members get a close look at equipment for the mission. Seen are Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan (left) and Garrett Reisman, ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members check out the underside of space shuttle Endeavour.  From left are Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman, Richard Linnehan and Robert Behnken, and Commander Dominic Gorie. They and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3562

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members check out the underside of space shuttle Endeavour. From left are Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman, Richard Linnehan a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman inspects the underside of space shuttle Endeavour.  He and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts.  The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3559

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialist Garrett Reisman inspects the underside of space shuttle Endeavour. He and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members examine one of the cameras that will be used on the mission.  From left are Mission Specialists Michael Foreman, Robert Behnken, Garrett Reismann and Richard Linnehan.  Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. These and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle.  The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3562A

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, ST...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members examine one of the cameras that will be used on the mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michael Foreman, Robert B... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman and Michael Foreman practice using the cameras that will be on the mission.  They and other crew members are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. Reisman will join the Expedition 16 crew on the International Space Station, replacing flight engineer Leopold Eyharts. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14.  It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3563

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 Mission Specialists Garrett Reisman and Michael Foreman practice using the cameras that will be on the mission. They and other crew me... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  After arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 mission crew greet the media on the Shuttle Landing Facility.  At the microphone is Commander Steve Frick.  Behind him, left to right, are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter. Eyhars and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency.  The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122.  The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3.  Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6.  Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe’s largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3512

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space C...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the STS-122 mission crew greet the media on the Shuttle Landing Facility. At the microphone is Commander Steve Frick. Behind him, l... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The STS-122 crew pose on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after their arrival for launch.  From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel, Rex Walheim and Leland Melvin, and Pilot Alan Poindexter and Commander Steve Frick. Eyharts and Schlegel represent the European Space Agency.  Eyharts will remain on the International Space Station while Atlantis returns flight engineer Daniel Tani.  The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122.  The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3.  Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6.  Atlantis will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3520

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew pose on the Shuttle La...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-122 crew pose on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after their arrival for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Leopold Eyharts, Stanley Lo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  After the mission STS-122 crew's arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts is introduced during a media  opportunity on the Shuttle Landing Facility.  Eyharts, who represents the European Space Agency, will remain on the International Space Station while Atlantis returns flight engineer Daniel Tani. The crew's arrival signals the imminent launch of space shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-122.  The launch countdown begins at 7 p.m. Dec. 3.  Launch is scheduled for 4:31 p.m. EST on Dec. 6.  Endeavour will carry the Columbus Lab, Europe's largest contribution to the construction of the International Space Station. It will support scientific and technological research in a microgravity environment. Columbus, a program of ESA, is a multifunctional, pressurized laboratory that will be permanently attached to Node 2 of the space station to carry out experiments in materials science, fluid physics and biosciences, as well as to perform a number of technological applications.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3519

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After the mission STS-122 crew's arriva...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After the mission STS-122 crew's arrival at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Mission Specialist Leopold Eyharts is introduced during a media opportunity on the Shuttle Landing Facili... more