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Topic: cryder

2006
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2011
1,010 media by topicpage 1 of 11
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, an emergency rescue worker tends to an "injured astronaut" inside a rescue vehicle.  Volunteers and emergency rescue workers are participating in a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew.   Known as a Mode VI exercise, the operation uses volunteer workers from the Center to pose as astronauts. The purpose of the simulation is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0517

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, an emergency rescue worker tends to an "injured astronaut" inside a rescue vehicle. Volunteers and emergency rescue worke... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, volunteer Charlie Plain poses as an injured astronaut during a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew.  Plain is a Public Affairs Web writer.   Known as a Mode VI exercise, the operation uses volunteer workers from the Center to pose as astronauts. The purpose of the simulation is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0519

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, volunteer Charlie Plain poses as an injured astronaut during a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew. Plain is a ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, emergency rescue personnel gently place an "injured astronaut" onto a stretcher.  Volunteers and emergency rescue workers are participating in a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew. Known as a Mode VI exercise, the operation uses volunteer workers from the Center to pose as astronauts. The purpose of the simulation is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0516

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, emergency rescue personnel gently place an "injured astronaut" onto a stretcher. Volunteers and emergency rescue workers ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, emergency rescue worker tend to "injured astronauts" during a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew.   Known as a Mode VI exercise, the operation uses volunteer workers from the Center to pose as astronauts. The purpose of the simulation is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0518

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, emergency rescue worker tend to "injured astronauts" during a simulated emergency landing of a shuttle crew. Known as a ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -   On its transporter, the spacecraft GOES-N leaves Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., on its way to Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. At the pad, the spacecraft will be lifted up into the mobile service tower and mated with a Boeing Delta IV rocket for launch.  GOES-N is the latest in a series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites for NOAA and NASA providing continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. GOES-N is scheduled for launch May 18.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0753

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On its transporter, the spacecraft GOE...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On its transporter, the spacecraft GOES-N leaves Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., on its way to Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. At the pad, ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -   On its transporter, the spacecraft GOES-N travels through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on its way to Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. At the pad, the spacecraft will be lifted up into the mobile service tower and mated with a Boeing Delta IV rocket for launch.  GOES-N is the latest in a series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites for NOAA and NASA providing continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. GOES-N is scheduled for launch May 18.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0754

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On its transporter, the spacecraft GOE...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On its transporter, the spacecraft GOES-N travels through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on its way to Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force St... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   The payload canister passes NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Control Center on its way to Launch Pad 39B.  Inside are the payloads for mission STS-121: the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, with supplies and equipment for the International Space Station; the lightweight multi-purpose experiment support structure carrier; and the integrated cargo carrier, with the mobile transporter reel assembly and a spare pump module. The payload will be transferred from the canister to Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay at the pad.  Discovery is scheduled to launch on mission STS-121 from Launch Pad 39B in a window that opens July 1 and extends to July 19. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd0845

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload canister passes NASA's Veh...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload canister passes NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Control Center on its way to Launch Pad 39B. Inside are the payloads for mission STS-121: the multi-purpo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -    In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis.  The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1635

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facil...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The tr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -   In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane is ready to lift the Port 3/4 truss segment and move it to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis.  The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1632

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane is ready to lift the Port 3/4 truss segment and move it to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -   In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment toward the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. On the right end are the mast canisters for the solar arrays. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1634

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment toward the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. On the... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -    The next element to be added to the International Space Station, the Port 3/4 truss segment is being moved to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis.  The cylinders shown are the mast canisters for the solar arrays.  The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1631

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The next element to be added to the I...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The next element to be added to the International Space Station, the Port 3/4 truss segment is being moved to a payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The c... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -  In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis.  The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1636

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the Port 3/4 truss segment into the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The trus... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -   In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the Port 3/4 truss segment across the floor to the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atlantis. The truss is slated for launch on mission STS-115 no earlier than Aug. 28. The truss is the next major addition to the 11-segment integrated truss structure that will eventually span more than 300 feet on the station. The P3/P4 truss, with its two large solar arrays, will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability of the completed station.  The P3/P4 truss is expected to be loaded into Atlantis's cargo bay around the beginning of August.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1633

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the Port 3/4 truss segment across the floor to the waiting payload canister for installation in the orbiter Atla... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Atlantis is lowered into high bay 3 for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boosters already installed on the mobile launcher platform. After the stacking, Atlantis will undergo a shuttle interface test and other prelaunch processing.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 28. During its 11-day mission to the International Space Station, the STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1663

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Atlant...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Atlantis is lowered into high bay 3 for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boosters already installed on the mobile launcher platform.... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the orbiter Atlantis has been lowered onto the mobile launcher platform below for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boosters already in place.  After the stacking, Atlantis will undergo a shuttle interface test and other prelaunch processing.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 28. During its 11-day mission to the International Space Station, the STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1667

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the orbiter Atlantis has been lowered onto the mobile launcher platform below for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the nose of the orbiter Atlantis is dwarfed by the external tank behind it and the twin solid rocket boosters.  The orbiter is being mated with the tank and boosters, already installed on the mobile launcher platform below.  After the stacking, Atlantis will undergo a shuttle interface test and other prelaunch processing.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 28. During its 11-day mission to the International Space Station, the STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1665

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the nose of the orbiter Atlantis is dwarfed by the external tank behind it and the twin solid rocket boosters. The orbiter is being... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Atlantis' external tank and solid rocket boosters are ready on the mobile launcher platform for mating with the orbiter Atlantis, being lowered by a crane.   After the stacking, Atlantis will undergo a shuttle interface test and other prelaunch processing.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 28. During its 11-day mission to the International Space Station, the STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1664

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Atlantis' external tank and solid rocket boosters are ready on the mobile launcher platform for mating with the orbiter Atlantis, be... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the orbiter Atlantis has been lowered onto the mobile launcher platform below for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boosters already in place. After the stacking, Atlantis will undergo a shuttle interface test and other prelaunch processing.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 28. During its 11-day mission to the International Space Station, the STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1666

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In high bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the orbiter Atlantis has been lowered onto the mobile launcher platform below for mating with the external tank and solid rocket boo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.   First motion was at 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1702

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher pl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath. First ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -     This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B shows the surrounding area, including the Atlantic Ocean in the background.  Extended toward Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The room provides access into the orbiter.   Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1724

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlanti...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B shows the surrounding area, including the Atlantic Ocean in the background. Extended toward Atlantis i... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The "beanie cap," at the end of the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm, is extended over the top of the external tank. The cap is a vent hood  that vacuums away the very cold liquid oxygen vapors as they boil off from the top of the external tank before launch.  Lower down on the left is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room on the outer end, extended toward Atlantis' crew access hatch. Below the orbiter, on each side of the main engine nozzles, are the tail service masts that provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6- to 8-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1722

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the har...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The "beanie cap," at the end of the external ta... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    The tracks of the crawler-transporter are visible on the crawlerway (foreground) leading to Launch Pad 39B after the 4-mile journey of Space Shuttle Atlantis, which sits on the pad.  At right is the 290-foot high, 300,000- gallon water tank that aids in sound suppression during launch. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the shuttle engines and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds, pouring into 16 nozzles atop the flame deflectors and from outlets in the main engines exhaust hole in the mobile launcher platform.   The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1716

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The tracks of the crawler-transporter ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The tracks of the crawler-transporter are visible on the crawlerway (foreground) leading to Launch Pad 39B after the 4-mile journey of Space Shuttle Atlantis, which sits on the p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B.   The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler, which transported it, is still underneath.  To the left is the rotating service structure, with the payload changeout room (PCR) open.  When the shuttle's payload is transported to the pad, it will be lifted into the PCR, the service structure will rotate to enclose the shuttle and the payload will be installed in Atlantis' payload bay.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1715

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Ve...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.   First motion was at 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1703

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher pl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath. First ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B.   The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler, which transported it, is still underneath.  To the left is the rotating service structure, with the payload changeout room (PCR) open.  When the shuttle's payload is transported to the pad, it will be lifted into the PCR, the service structure will rotate to enclose the shuttle and the payload will be installed in Atlantis' payload bay.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1713

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Ve...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Finally in the bright light of day, Space Shuttle Atlantis nears the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, which in turn rests on the crawler-transporter.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1709

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Finally in the bright light of day, Spa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Finally in the bright light of day, Space Shuttle Atlantis nears the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m. The shuttle si... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Looking like fireflies gathered around the behemoth mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, vehicles escort Space Shuttle Atlantis on its slow journey to Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1704

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking like fireflies gathered around t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Looking like fireflies gathered around the behemoth mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, vehicles escort Space Shuttle Atlantis on its slow journey to Launch Pad 39B. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis is on its slow rollout to Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m. The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1705

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher pl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis is on its slow rollout to Launch Pad 39B. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m. Th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   In the bright light of day, Space Shuttle Atlantis nears the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, which in turn rests on the crawler-transporter.  At right is the 290-foot high, 300,000- gallon water tank that aids in sound suppression during launch. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the shuttle engines and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds, pouring into 16 nozzles atop the flame deflectors and from outlets in the main engines exhaust hole in the mobile launcher platform.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1710

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the bright light of day, Space Shutt...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the bright light of day, Space Shuttle Atlantis nears the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m. The shuttle sits on to... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    Space Shuttle Atlantis, atop the mobile launcher platform, sits on Launch Pad 39B after a nearly 8-hour crawl from the Vehicle Assembly Building.  At left is the open rotating service structure and fixed service structure with the 80-foot lightning mast on top.  Extended from the fixed structure is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room adjacent to Atlantis. At right is the 290-foot high, 300,000- gallon water tank that aids in sound suppression during launch. The water releases just prior to the ignition of the shuttle engines and flows through 7-foot-diameter pipes for about 20 seconds, pouring into 16 nozzles atop the flame deflectors and from outlets in the main engines exhaust hole in the mobile launcher platform.   Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1725

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis, atop the mobil...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis, atop the mobile launcher platform, sits on Launch Pad 39B after a nearly 8-hour crawl from the Vehicle Assembly Building. At left is the open rotating se... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   In the early morning light, photographers maneuver for the best position to capture Space Shuttle Atlantis as it rolls toward Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, which in turn rests on the crawler-transporter.   The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1707

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning light, photographe...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning light, photographers maneuver for the best position to capture Space Shuttle Atlantis as it rolls toward Launch Pad 39B. First motion out of the Vehicle Asse... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.   First motion was at 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1701

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher pl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B shows the surrounding area, including the Atlantic Ocean in the background.  Above the orange external tank is the "beanie cap" at the end of the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm. The cap is a vent hood  that vacuums away the very cold liquid oxygen vapors as they boil off from the top of the external tank before launch.  Lower down is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room on the outer end, extended toward Atlantis' crew access hatch.   The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6- to 8-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1723

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlantis...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This closeup of Space Shuttle Atlantis on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B shows the surrounding area, including the Atlantic Ocean in the background. Above the orange external t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.   First motion was at 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1700

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher pl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins rolling out of the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B via the crawler-transporter underneath.... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building.  Extending from the fixed service structure on the left is the orbiter access arm, with the White Room on the outer end, adjacent to Atlantis.  Below the orbiter, on each side of the main engine nozzles, are the tail service masts that provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another.   Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder & George Shelton KSC-06pd1726

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hards...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Space Shuttle Atlantis sits on the hardstand of Launch Pad 39B after its nearly 8-hour rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. Extending from the fixed service structure on th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B.   The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform.  The crawler, which transported it, is still underneath.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1714

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Ve...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After its overnight rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis rests on the hard stand on Launch Pad 39B. The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Silhouetted against the rising sun, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls toward Launch Pad 39B.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The shuttle sits on top of the mobile launcher platform, which in turn rests on the crawler-transporter.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1708

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Silhouetted against the rising sun, Spa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Silhouetted against the rising sun, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls toward Launch Pad 39B. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m. The shuttle sits on top o... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out to Launch Pad 39B via the crawlerway.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 a.m.  The slow speed of the crawler results in a 6-hour trek to the pad approximately 4 miles away.  Atlantis' launch window begins Aug. 27 for an 11-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-115 crew of six astronauts will continue construction of the station and install their cargo, the Port 3/4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd1706

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher p...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls out to Launch Pad 39B via the crawlerway. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was 1:05 ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS)  still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2053

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS)  still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2052

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -    The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS)  still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally scheduled to launch at 12:29 p.m. EDT on this date, but  a 24-hour scrub was called by mission managers due to a concern with Fuel Cell 1.  Seen poised above the orange external tank is the vent hood (known as the "beanie cap") at the end of the gaseous oxygen vent arm. Vapors are created as the liquid oxygen in the external tank boil off. The hood vents the gaseous oxygen vapors away from the space shuttle vehicle. Extending from the FSS to Atlantis is the orbiter access arm with the White Room at the end.  The White Room provides entry into the orbiter through the hatch.  At right is the 300,000-gallon water tank that releases its contents onto the mobile launcher platform during liftoff to aid sound suppression. During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2051

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The morning sky lightens behind Space Shuttle Atlantis while lights on the fixed service structure (FSS) still illuminate the orbiter on Launch Pad 39B. Atlantis was originally s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  Seen in the photo is the lower parking lot for the NASA News Center where the media's vehicles and satellite trucks are situated the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2069

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the L...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Seen in the photo is the lower parking lot for the NASA News Center where the media's... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Menacing storm clouds roll  through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  Framed between the horizon and the clouds is Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39B.  The flag in the foreground is at the NASA News Center, near the countdown clock.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2070

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Framed between the horizon and the clouds is Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Storm clouds fill the sky behind the Vehicle Assembly Building on the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2068

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds fill the sky behind the Veh...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Storm clouds fill the sky behind the Vehicle Assembly Building on the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115. During th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.  In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building.  In the foreground is the lower parking lot for the NASA News Center where the media's vehicles and satellite trucks are situated the day before (L-1) the second scheduled launch attempt for Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-115.  During the STS-115 mission, Atlantis' astronauts will deliver and install the 17.5-ton, bus-sized P3/P4 integrated truss segment on the station. The girder-like truss includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics and will provide one-fourth of the total power-generation capability for the completed station. This mission is the 116th space shuttle flight, the 27th flight for orbiter Atlantis, and the 19th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-115 is scheduled to last 11 days with a planned landing at KSC.   Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2071

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the L...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Menacing storm clouds roll through the Launch Complex 39 Area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. In the foreground is the lower p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the SPACEHAB Module towards the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2448

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing F...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the SPACEHAB Module towards the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, fl... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the protective coverings on the SPACEHAB Module before it is transferred to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station. STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1.  Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2443

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the protective coverings on the SPACEHAB Module before it is transferred to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Mod... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the protective coverings on the SPACEHAB Module before it is transferred to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station. STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1.  Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2442

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the protective coverings on the SPACEHAB Module before it is transferred to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Mod... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts the SPACEHAB Module from its stand for transfer to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2446

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts the SPACEHAB Module from its stand for transfer to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --     Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the SPACEHAB Module into the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2450

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the SPACEHAB Module into the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, fligh... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the SPACEHAB Module to the overhead crane for transfer to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2445

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians secure the SPACEHAB Module to the overhead crane for transfer to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry rac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the SPACEHAB Module towards the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2447

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the SPACEHAB Module towards the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, fli... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the SPACEHAB Module into the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station.  STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2449

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing F...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lowers the SPACEHAB Module into the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves towards the SPACEHAB Module to transport in to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of experiments, flight hardware, spacewalk equipment and supplies to support mission STS-116 to the International Space Station. STS-116 will be mission number 20 to the station and construction flight 12A.1. Along with SPACEHAB, the mission payload on Space Shuttle Discovery includes the P5 integrated truss structure and other key components. The launch window opens Dec. 7.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2444

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves towards the SPACEHAB Module to transport in to the Payload Canister. The SPACEHAB Module will carry racks of ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers on the floor watch as an overhead crane moves the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to a stand for weighing. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2495

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers on the floor watch as an overhead crane moves the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to a stand for weighing. The Japanese Aerospa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) across the facility.  The module is being moved to another stand where it will be weighed and measured for its center of gravity.  Other modules intended for the International Space Station are visible on other stands.  The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2497

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) across the facility. The module is being moved to another stand where it ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, makes a return trip to its transporter.  The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2502

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, makes a return trip to its transporter. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Ag... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) off of its transporter.  The module is being moved to another stand where it will be weighed and measured for its center of gravity. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2494

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) off of its transporter. The module is being moved to another stand where it... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers monitor the movement of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) as it is lowered onto a weighing stand.  The module will also be measured for its center of gravity. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2500

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers monitor the movement of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) as it is lowered onto a weighing stand. The module will also be mea... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane begins lowering the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto a weighing stand.  The module will also be measured for its center of gravity.  The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2498

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane begins lowering the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto a weighing stand. The module will also be measured for its c... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) across the facility.  The module is being moved to another stand where it will be weighed and measured for its center of gravity. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2496

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facilit...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane carries the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) across the facility. The module is being moved to another stand where it ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers monitor the placement of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto its transporter.  The JEM was moved from the transporter for weighing and to measure its center of gravity.  The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2504

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers monitor the placement of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto its transporter. The JEM was moved from the transporter for we... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers are attaching an overhead crane to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) in order to  lift it.  The module is being moved to a stand where it will be weighed and measured for its center of gravity. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2493

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers are attaching an overhead crane to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) in order to lift it. The module is being moved to a stan... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, is lifted off the scale to be returned to its transporter. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2501

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, is lifted off the scale to be returned to its transporter. The Japanese Aeros... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, has been moved back across the facility and is lowered onto its transporter.  The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2503

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), after being weighed, has been moved back across the facility and is lowered onto its transporter. T... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers observe as an overhead crane lowers the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto a weighing stand.  The module will also be measured for its center of gravity. The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. It is the first element, named "Kibo" (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM is targeted for mission STS-124, to launch in early 2008.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-06pd2499

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers observe as an overhead crane lowers the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onto a weighing stand. The module will also be measure... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft the last few inches onto the Delta II upper stage booster.  Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0190

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technici...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft the last few inches onto the Delta II upper stage booster. Once mated, the spacecraft will then be ins... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft onto the Delta II upper stage booster.  Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II.  THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0189

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technici...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft onto the Delta II upper stage booster. Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its tran... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help guide the overhead crane carrying the THEMIS spacecraft toward the Delta II upper stage booster at right.  Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0187

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technic...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help guide the overhead crane carrying the THEMIS spacecraft toward the Delta II upper stage booster at right. Once mated, the spacecr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   At Astrotech Space Operations, the THEMIS spacecraft (background) is being lifted to move it to the Delta II upper stage booster (foreground) for mating.  The spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0186

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, the THE...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, the THEMIS spacecraft (background) is being lifted to move it to the Delta II upper stage booster (foreground) for mating. The spacecraft will the... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft toward the Delta II upper stage booster.  Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II.  THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0188

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technici...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians help lower the THEMIS spacecraft toward the Delta II upper stage booster. Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its tr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians lower the THEMIS spacecraft onto the Delta II upper stage booster.  Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transportation canister and moved to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for mating with the Delta II. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 Pad 17-B. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0191

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technici...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Astrotech Space Operations, technicians lower the THEMIS spacecraft onto the Delta II upper stage booster. Once mated, the spacecraft will then be installed into its transport... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers guide the suspended upper canister toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster at right.  When the upper and lower canisters are joined, the THEMIS will be completely enclosed  and will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle.  THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0209

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Ope...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers guide the suspended upper canister toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster at right. When the upper and lower... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers prepare to join the upper cylindrical canister to the lower panels already in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster.  When completely enclosed, THEMIS will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0212

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Ope...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers prepare to join the upper cylindrical canister to the lower panels already in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   With all lower panels of the transportation canister in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster, workers at left prepare to move the overhead crane above them to the cylindrical upper canister and place it over THEMIS. When THEMIS is completely enclosed, it will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0208

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With all lower panels of the transport...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With all lower panels of the transportation canister in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster, workers at left prepare to move the overhead crane above them ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers secure the upper cylindrical canister to the lower panels already in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster.  When completely enclosed, THEMIS will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0213

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Op...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers secure the upper cylindrical canister to the lower panels already in place around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage bo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, the upper cylindrical canister is lowered toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster below.  When the upper and lower canisters are joined, the THEMIS will be completely enclosed  and will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0210

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Oper...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, the upper cylindrical canister is lowered toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster below. When the upper and lower cani... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers guide the upper canister toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster below.  The upper canister will be joined to the lower panels already in place.  Then, THEMIS will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0211

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Oper...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations, workers guide the upper canister toward the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster below. The upper canister will be joined to t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  A worker in the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations places a lower panel of the transportation canister around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster.   When THEMIS is completely enclosed, it will be transported to Launch Complex 17-B for mating with its launch vehicle. THEMIS consists of five identical probes, the largest number of scientific satellites ever launched into orbit aboard a single rocket. This unique constellation of satellites will resolve the tantalizing mystery of what causes the spectacular sudden brightening of the aurora borealis and aurora australis - the fiery skies over the Earth's northern and southern polar regions. THEMIS is scheduled to launch Feb. 15 from Pad 17-B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket managed by the United Launch Alliance.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0207

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A worker in the high bay at Astrotech S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A worker in the high bay at Astrotech Space Operations places a lower panel of the transportation canister around the THEMIS spacecraft and upper stage booster. When THEMIS is c... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system is lifted above the work platforms prior to installation in Endeavour. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0797

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system is lifted above the work platforms prior to installation in Endeavour. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mis... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers secure the overhead lifting device that will lift the orbiter boom sensor system for installation in Endeavour. Endeavour is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0795

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers secure the overhead lifting device that will lift the orbiter boom sensor system for installation in Endeavour. Endeavour is schedul... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers monitor the placement of the orbiter boom sensor system in Endeavour's payload bay.  The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0800

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers monitor the placement of the orbiter boom sensor system in Endeavour's payload bay. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers secure the orbiter boom sensor system in Endeavour's payload bay. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0801

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, w...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, workers secure the orbiter boom sensor system in Endeavour's payload bay. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the Internati... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --   In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system (in the background) is moved toward the open payload bay of Endeavour.  The boom will be installed in the payload bay for launch. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0798

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2,...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system (in the background) is moved toward the open payload bay of Endeavour. The boom will be installed in the pa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system is lifted from its stand for installation in Endeavour.  The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0796

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system is lifted from its stand for installation in Endeavour. The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA.  --  In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system (in the background) is lowered into the open payload bay of Endeavour.  The boom will be installed in the payload bay for launch.  The orbiter is scheduled to fly on mission STS-118 to the International Space Station in the summer of 2007.  It will deliver the third starboard truss segment, S5.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd0799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2, the orbiter boom sensor system (in the background) is lowered into the open payload bay of Endeavour. The boom will be installed in the pay... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins its return to Launch Pad 39A. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT.   In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1179

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assemb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis begins its return to Launch Pad 39A. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, Atlantis' ex... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Reflected in water in a drainage canal, Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, heads for Launch Pad 39A.  This is the second rollout for the shuttle.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1194

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Reflected in water in a drainage canal,...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Reflected in water in a drainage canal, Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, heads for Launch Pad 39A. This is the second rollo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter at sunrise.  First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT.  In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter at sunrise. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls through the doors of high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building for its return to Launch Pad 39A.  First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT.  In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls through th...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis rolls through the doors of high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building for its return to Launch Pad 39A. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late Fe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter just after sunrise.  First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT.  In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1184

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter just after sunrise. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late Fe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits its return to Launch Pad 39A.  In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1178

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assemb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits its return to Launch Pad 39A. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage dur... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter at dawn.  First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT.  In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1181

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, rolls to Launch Pad 39A atop a crawler transporter at dawn. First motion was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, Atl... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   This view of Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, as it moves onto Launch Pad 39A also shows the expendable rocket launch pads in the background on the east side of the Banana River. This is the second rollout for the shuttle.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This view of Space Shuttle Atlantis, m...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This view of Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, as it moves onto Launch Pad 39A also shows the expendable rocket launch pads in the background on the ea... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, finally rests on the hard stand of Launch Pad 39A.   At bottom left is the White Room, which is situated on the end of the fixed service structure's orbiter access arm.  At the top of the photo, in the background, is the Atlantic Ocean.   This is the second rollout for the shuttle.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1198

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, finally rests on the hard stand of Launch Pad 39A. At bottom left is the White Room, which is situated on the end ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis is ready for its return to Launch Pad 39A. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1177

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assemb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In high bay No. 1 of the Vehicle Assembly Building, Space Shuttle Atlantis is ready for its return to Launch Pad 39A. In late February, Atlantis' external tank received hail damag... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Under a feather-painted sky, Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, nears Launch Pad 39A. This is the second rollout for the shuttle.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1193

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a feather-painted sky, Space Shut...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under a feather-painted sky, Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, nears Launch Pad 39A. This is the second rollout for the shutt... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  The leading edge of the mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, and carrying Space Shuttle Atlantis, heads toward the gate of Launch Pad 39A.  This is the second rollout for the shuttle.  First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1195

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The leading edge of the mobile launch p...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The leading edge of the mobile launch platform atop a crawler transporter, and carrying Space Shuttle Atlantis, heads toward the gate of Launch Pad 39A. This is the second rollou... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, finally rests on the hard stand of Launch Pad 39A after an early morning rollout.  This is the second rollout for the shuttle. Seen on either side of the main engine exhaust hole on the launcher platform are the tail service masts. Their function is to provide umbilical connections for liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen lines to fuel the external tank from storage tanks adjacent to the launch pad. Other umbilical lines carry helium and nitrogen, as well as ground electrical power and connections for vehicle data and communications. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 5:02 a.m. EDT. In late February, while Atlantis was on the launch pad, Atlantis' external tank received hail damage during a severe thunderstorm that passed through the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 area. The hail caused visible divots in the giant tank's foam insulation, as well as minor surface damage to about 26 heat shield tiles on the shuttle's left wing. The shuttle was returned to the VAB for repairs. The launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-117 is now targeted for June 8. A flight readiness review will be held on May 30 and 31.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-07pd1200

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Space Shuttle Atlantis, mounted on a mobile launch platform, finally rests on the hard stand of Launch Pad 39A after an early morning rollout. This is the second rollout for the ... more