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Topic: crew module

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Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18.

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18.

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Phase 1

Orion at Hydro Impact Basin Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A team of aerospace workers gathers for a group photo in front of space shuttle Endeavour's crew module. Endeavour was in the process of moving from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the nearby Shuttle Landing Facility, where it will be lifted in the gantry-like Mate-Demate Device and placed atop NASA's modified 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft for the final ferry flight of the Space Shuttle Program. Endeavour will be placed on permanent public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-5074

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A team of aerospace workers gathers for a group...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A team of aerospace workers gathers for a group photo in front of space shuttle Endeavour's crew module. Endeavour was in the process of moving from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA'... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementally pressurizes the spacecraft with breathing air and is designed to demonstrate weld strength capability and structural performance at maximum flight operating pressures.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on a Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2012-6105

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementa... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementally pressurizes the spacecraft with breathing air and is designed to demonstrate weld strength capability and structural performance at maximum flight operating pressures.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on a Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2012-6103

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementa... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementally pressurizes the spacecraft with breathing air and is designed to demonstrate weld strength capability and structural performance at maximum flight operating pressures.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on a Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2012-6104

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 crew module is undergoing proof pressure testing at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The test incrementa... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, an engineer prepares for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3766

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, an engineer prepares for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s fi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3765

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3764

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3763

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers prepare for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers monitor data for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3767

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers monitor data for the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers monitor data during the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA’s first-ever deep space craft, Orion, was powered on for the first time, marking a major milestone in the final year of preparations for flight. Orion’s avionics system was installed on the crew module and powered up for a series of systems tests.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of Orion, EFT-1, is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2013-3768

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Orion Test and Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers monitor data during the first Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, power up test. NASA... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew module is positioned on a special portable test chamber and prepared for a multi-point random vibration test. Accelerometers and strain gages have been attached to Orion in various locations. During a series of tests, each lasting only 30 seconds, Orion will be subjected to gradually increasing levels of vibrations that represent levels the vehicle would experience during launch, orbit and descent. The data is reviewed in order to assess the health of the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2275

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hig...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew module is positioned on a special portable test chamber and prepared for a m... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians attach the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, onto the ogive panel mockup hatch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2365

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians practice lining up the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, on the ogive panel mockup hatch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2367

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. An access platform has been added leading up to the mockup of the crew module. Technicians are preparing the mockup of the crew module inner hatch for installation using the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2373

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians attach the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, onto the mockup. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2363

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator for a GIZMO demonstration test. A technician moves the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the crew module and LAS flight hatches for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, toward the mockup. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2360

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an O... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians practice lining up the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, on the ogive panel mockup hatch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2368

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator for a GIZMO demonstration test. The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the crew module and LAS flight hatches for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2358

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an O... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians practice lining up the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, on the ogive panel mockup hatch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2366

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator for a GIZMO demonstration test. The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the crew module and LAS flight hatches for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2359

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians prepare the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an O... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. An access platform has been added leading up to the mockup of the crew module. Technicians used the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, to install the mockup of the crew module inner hatch. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2374

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. Technicians attached the GIZMO to remove the outer ogive panel hatch on the Orion crew module simulator. The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2364

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians are performing a GIZMO demonstration test on the ground test article Launch Abort... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. An access platform has been added leading up to the mockup of the crew module. Technicians are preparing the mockup of the crew module inner hatch for installation using the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2372

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians have prepared the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator for a GIZMO demonstration test. A technician moves the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the crew module and LAS flight hatches for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, toward the mockup. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2362

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians have prepared the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel an... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. An access platform has been added leading up to the mockup of the crew module. The inner hatch has been removed. The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2370

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians have prepared the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator for a GIZMO demonstration test. A technician moves the GIZMO, a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the crew module and LAS flight hatches for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1, toward the mockup. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2361

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, engineers and technicians have prepared the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel an... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. An access platform and diving board have been added leading up to the mockup of the crew module hatch. The inner hatch has been removed The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2371

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive panel and an Orion crew module simulator. A technician on an access platform and diving board removes the mockup of the crew module hatch. The GIZMO is a pneumatically-balanced manipulator that will be used for installation of the hatches on the crew module and LAS for the uncrewed Exploration Flight Test-1 and Exploration Mission-1. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is running the test to demonstrate that the GIZMO can meet the reach and handling requirements for the task.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket and in 2017 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2369

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a GIZMO demonstration test is being performed on the ground test article Launch Abort System, or LAS, ogive... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers monitor the progress as a crane positions the Orion heat shield near the crew module in the high bay. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield and are preparing it for installation on the Orion crew module.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2014-2750

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hi...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers monitor the progress as a crane positions the Or... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move the heat shield for the Orion crew module down the aisle inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield and are preparing it for installation on the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2756

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move the heat shield for the Orion crew module down the aisle inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has been secured in a special work stand inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield and are preparing it for installation on the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2753

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has been secured in a special work stand inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technic... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers have positioned the heat shield near the Orion crew module. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield and are preparing it for installation on the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2758

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building hi...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers have positioned the heat shield near the Orion c... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has been secured in a special work stand inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technicians prepare to move the heat shield for a fit check with the crew module. More than 200 instrumentation sensors have been installed on the heat shield.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2754

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The heat shield for the Orion crew module has been secured in a special work stand inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technic... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move the heat shield for the Orion crew module down the aisle inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Technicians have installed more than 200 instrumentation sensors on the heat shield and are preparing it for installation on the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-2755

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians and engineers move the heat shield for the Orion crew module down the aisle inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Cente... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To his right is Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs Officer, and standing behind him is Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2957

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark th...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Build... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, at right, helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In view behind him is the crew module stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2959

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, at right, helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operatio... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Public Affairs Officer Rachel Kraft welcomes members of the media to the Operations and Checkout Building high at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1.  To her right are NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden and Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. To her left are Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager. Behind them is the crew module stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2961

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Public Affairs Officer Rachel Kraft welcom...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Public Affairs Officer Rachel Kraft welcomes members of the media to the Operations and Checkout Building high at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to mark the T-6 months and co... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To his right is Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs Officer, and standing behind him is Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2958

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana helps ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA astronaut Doug Hurley talks to a member of the media during an event to mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the background is NASA astronaut Rex Walheim. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2965

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA astronaut Doug Hurley talks to a member of...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA astronaut Doug Hurley talks to a member of the media during an event to mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Ope... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To his right is Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. To his left are Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager. Behind them is the crew module stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2962

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Administrat...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Ope... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager, along with NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, to his right, and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana help mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At left is Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs Officer. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2954

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager, along w...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Mark Geyer, NASA Orion Program manager, along with NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, to his right, and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana help mark the T-6 months and counting to t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Program Manager Mark Geyer marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To his right is Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. Partially hidden behind him is NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden. To his left is Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs Officer.  Behind them is the crew module stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2963

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Progr...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Program Manager Mark Geyer marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, in the Operations and... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Program Manager Mark Geyer marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, in the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. To his right is Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. Partially hidden behind him is NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden. To his left is Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager, and Rachel Kraft, NASA Public Affairs Officer.  Behind them is the crew module stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2964

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Progr...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Members of the media listen as NASA Orion Program Manager Mark Geyer marks the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, in the Operations and... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2955

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cleon Lacefield, Lockheed Martin Orion Program manager helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, inside the Operations and Chec... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The crew module has been stacked on the service module in the Final Assembly and System Testing cell. EFT-1 will provide engineers with data about the heat shield's ability to protect Orion and its future crews from the 4,000-degree heat of reentry and an ocean splashdown following the spacecraft’s 20,000-mph reentry from space. Data gathered during the flight will inform decisions about design improvements on the heat shield and other Orion systems, and authenticate existing computer models and new approaches to space systems design and development. This process is critical to reducing overall risks and costs of future Orion missions.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-2956

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark th...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden helps mark the T-6 months and counting to the launch of Orion on Exploration Flight Test-1, or EFT-1, during a visit to the Operations and Checkout Build... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cover for the Orion crew module. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4198

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cov... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians on a work platform monitor the progress as a crane lowers the forward bay cover onto the Orion crew module for a fit check. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4201

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians on a work platform monitor the progress as a cra... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cover for the Orion crew module. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4199

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cov... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians monitor the progress as a crane lifts the forward bay cover for a fit check on the Orion crew module. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4200

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians monitor the progress as a crane lifts the forwar... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cover for the Orion crew module. The cover is a shell that fits over Orion's crew module to protect the spacecraft during launch, orbital flight and re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. When Orion returns from space, the cover must be jettisoned high above the ground so that the parachutes can deploy and unfurl.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4197

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin technicians prepare to do a fit check of the forward bay cov... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. Technicians in clean room suits monitor the progress as the crane slowly lowers the stack onto a mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3774

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. The stack has been lowered onto the mating device on a stand. Technicians are attaching the stack to the mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3778

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane has lifted the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 out of the test cell and is being transferred to a mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3766

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane has lifted the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration F... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being lowered onto a mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3772

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being moved along the center aisle. Orion will be transferred to a mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3768

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. The stack has been lowered onto the mating device on a stand. Technicians are attaching the stack to the mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.     Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3779

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being moved along the center aisle toward the mating device.  A protective covering surrounds the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3769

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. The stack has been lowered onto the mating device on a stand. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3775

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being moved along the center aisle. Orion will be transferred to a mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3767

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell and is being lowered onto a mating device A protective covering surrounds the crew module.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3773

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was lifted by crane out of the test cell. The stack has been lowered onto the mating device. Technicians are attaching the stack to the mating device. A protective covering surrounds the crew module.      Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted test flight of the Orion is scheduled to launch later this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an altitude of 3,600 miles above the Earth's surface. The two-orbit, four-hour flight test will help engineers evaluate the systems critical to crew safety including the heat shield, parachute system and launch abort system. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-3776

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checko...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew and service module stack for Exploration Flight Test-1 was li... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA and U.S. Navy personnel are on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego and heads out to sea in the Pacific Ocean.  NASA and the U.S. Navy are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4612

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA and U.S. Navy personnel are on the deck of th...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA and U.S. Navy personnel are on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego and heads out to sea in the Pacific Ocean. NASA and the U.S. Navy are making prepa... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 personnel review procedures on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California for the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. NASA and the U.S. Navy are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4629

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 personnel review ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 personnel review procedures on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California for the open waters of the Pacific Ocean.... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy personnel are stationed on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California. NASA and the U.S. Navy are heading out to sea ahead of Orion's flight test to prepare for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4609

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy personnel are stationed on the deck of t...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy personnel are stationed on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California. NASA and the U.S. Navy are heading out to sea ahead of Orion's flig... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 salute Rear Admiral Fernandez L. "Frank" Ponds, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3, during his visit on the deck of the USS Anchorage near Naval Base San Diego in California. The ship is heading out to sea in the Pacific Ocean. NASA and the U.S. Navy are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4611

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 sal...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – U.S. Navy and Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 salute Rear Admiral Fernandez L. "Frank" Ponds, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3, during his visit on the deck of the USS Anchorage near... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – A member of the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 signals to the pilot in an H60-S Seahawk helicopter on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California for the open waters of the Pacific Ocean. NASA and the U.S. Navy are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4613

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – A member of the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 s...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – A member of the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8 signals to the pilot in an H60-S Seahawk helicopter on the deck of the USS Anchorage as the ship departs Naval Base San Diego in California f... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – An H60-S Seahawk helicopter lands on the deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. NASA and the U.S. Navy are heading out to sea ahead of Orion's flight test to prepare for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4610

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – An H60-S Seahawk helicopter lands on the deck of t...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – An H60-S Seahawk helicopter lands on the deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. NASA and the U.S. Navy are heading out to sea ahead of Orion's flight tes... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The USNS Salvor, a safeguard-class rescue and salvage ship, is docked at Naval Base San Diego in California. The ship will head out to sea along with the USS Anchorage ahead of Orion's first flight test. NASA and U.S. Navy personnel are making preparations ahead of Orion's flight test for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. If needed, the Salvor would be used for an alternate recovery method. Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4628

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The USNS Salvor, a safeguard-class rescue and salv...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – The USNS Salvor, a safeguard-class rescue and salvage ship, is docked at Naval Base San Diego in California. The ship will head out to sea along with the USS Anchorage ahead of Orion's first... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4652

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is p... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4651

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is p... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4650

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are ...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing the well deck of the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is p... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel review recovery procedures on the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch this week atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4653

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel revi...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel review recovery procedures on the USS Anchorage in the Pacific Ocean near the Orion recovery site ahead of the first flight test. The team is pr... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in two rigid hull Zodiac boats about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4681

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in two rigid hull... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the well deck of the USS Anchorage has been filled with water and recovery hardware is in place. U.S. Navy divers have embarked from ship to practice recovery procedures in rigid hull inflatable boats and Zodiac boats. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4685

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the well deck of the USS Anchorage has been filled with water and recovery hardware is in pl... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the well deck of the USS Anchorage has been filled with water and recovery hardware is in place. The ship is about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4684

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the well deck of the USS Anchorage has been filled with water and recovery hardware is in pl... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in a rigid hull Zodiac boat about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4683

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in a rigid hull Z... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in a rigid hull Zodiac boat about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes on its return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4682

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, U.S. Navy Divers prepare to embark from the well deck of the USS Anchorage in a rigid hull Z... more

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the USNS Salvor is in the Pacific Ocean, nearby the USS Anchorage, about 600 miles off the coast of Baja, California. The Salvor will be used to recover Orion in the event that the spacecraft cannot be recovered using the well deck of the USS Anchorage. NASA, Lockheed Martin and U.S. Navy personnel are preparing for recovery of the crew module, forward bay cover and parachutes after the spacecraft's return from space and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program is leading the recovery efforts.    The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch Dec. 4 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket. During its two-orbit, 4.5-hour flight, Orion will venture 3,600 miles in altitude and travel nearly 60,000 miles before returning to Earth for a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2014-4680

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of O...

SAN DIEGO, Calif. – On the third day of preparations for recovery of Orion after its splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, the USNS Salvor is in the Pacific Ocean, nearby the USS Anchorage, about 600 miles off the c... more

Orion EM-1 Crew Module Testing

Orion EM-1 Crew Module Testing

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew module adapter (CMA) for Exploration Mission 1 has been moved to a test stand inside... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers monitor the progress as a crane lifts the Orion crew module from E... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers monitor the progress as a crane moves the Orion crew module from E... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers monitor the progress as a crane lowers the Orion crew module from ... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC engineers and technicians review procedures before preparing the Orion cre... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers monitor the progress as a crane is attached to the top of the Orio... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

A close-up view of the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A crane has lifted the crew mod... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 is lowered onto a custom-built transport stand... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers assist as a crane lowers the Orion crew module from Exploration Fl... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the American flag is in view on the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1. Lockheed Mart... more

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

EFT-1 Crew Module preparations to move to KSC Visitor Complex

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin and ASRC workers monitor the progress as a crane moves the Orion crew module from E... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1, secured on its custom-made ground support equipment, is moved inside the IMAX Theater. The crew m... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1, secured on its custom-made ground support equipment, is moved inside the IMAX Theater. The crew m... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, a crane is attached to the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 secured on its custom-made ground support equipment. The crew module will b... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

At the IMAX Theater at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1, secured on its custom-made ground support equipment, has been lowered to the ... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

The Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 arrives at the entrance to NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. The crew module, secured on ground support equipment atop a flatbed truck,... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

Inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Lockheed Martin workers prepare the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 for its move to the nea... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

The Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 is transported west along the NASA Causeway toward NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. The crew module will be delivered to the IMAX Thea... more

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

EFT-1 Crew Module move to KSC Visitor Complex for exhibit displa

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida, a crane lowers the Orion crew module from Exploration Flight Test 1 to the ground, secured on its custom-made ground support equipment. The crew module... more