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Topic: crew module

1968
1968
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2017
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2017
504 media by topicpage 1 of 6
Early Program Development

Early Program Development

This 1969 artist's concept illustrates the use of three major elements of NASA's Integrated program, as proposed by President Nixon's Space Task Group. In Phases I and II, a Space Tug with a manipulator-equippe... more

Early Program Development

Early Program Development

Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was intended to be a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combi... more

STS-51-L Debris (Airlock)

STS-51-L Debris (Airlock)

On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. Search teams later retrieved... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-117 Pilot Lee Archambault is helped by the closeout crew in the White Room to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis.  The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT. Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1470

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Pilot Lee Archambault is helped...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Pilot Lee Archambault is helped by the closeout crew in the White Room to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. The mission to the Internati... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, members of the closeout crew help STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis.  The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT.  Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1471

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, m...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, members of the closeout crew help STS-117 Mission Specialist James Reilly secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis.... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-117 Mission Specialist Steven Swanson is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. Behind Swanson is astronaut Clayton Anderson, waiting his turn.  Anderson is joining the Expedition 15 crew on the International Space Station; Flight Engineer Suni Williams will return to Earth in his place. The mission to the space station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT.  Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1473

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-117 Mission Specialist Steven Swanson is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlanti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow is helped by the closeout crew in the White Room on Launch Pad 39A to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis.  The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT. Members of the Closeout Crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1469

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow is...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-117 Commander Frederick Sturckow is helped by the closeout crew in the White Room on Launch Pad 39A to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. The... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-117 Mission Specialist John "Danny" Olivas is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. Behind Olivas is Pilot Lee Archambault.  The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT.   Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1474

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-117 Mission Specialist John "Danny" Olivas is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle A... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --    In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, astronaut Clayton Anderson is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. Anderson is flying to the International Space Station with the STS-117 crew to join the Expedition 15 crew on the space station.  Flight Engineer Suni Williams will return to Earth in his place. The mission to the space station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT.  Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1475

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, astronaut Clayton Anderson is helped by the closeout crew to secure his launch suit before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis. Anderson is... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, members of the closeout crew help STS-117Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester secure his equipment before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlantis.  The mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch at 7:38 p.m. EDT.  Members of the closeout crew help the astronauts don a parachute pack, strap them into the space shuttle's crew module and take care of any other last-minute needs that arise. The White Room is at the end of the orbiter access arm that extends from the fixed service structure and provides entry into the orbiter. The shuttle is delivering a new segment to the starboard side of the space station's backbone, known as the truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install the S3/S4 truss segment, deploy a set of solar arrays and prepare them for operation. STS-117 is the 118th space shuttle flight, the 21st flight to the station, the 28th flight for Atlantis and the first of four flights planned for 2007.  Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray & Don Kight KSC-07pp1472

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, m...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, members of the closeout crew help STS-117Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester secure his equipment before climbing into Space Shuttle Atlanti... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Alvin Drew is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour.  Drew is making his first space flight. The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2283

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Alvin Drew is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. Drew is ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2282

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, ST...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. The ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Barbara R. Morgan is helped by the closeout crew with final preparations of her launch and entry suit.  Morgan is a teacher-turned-astronaut making her first space flight.  Behind her is Mission Specialist Tracy Caldwell, also making her first flight.  The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2281

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Barbara R. Morgan is helped by the closeout crew with final preparations of her launch and entry suit. Morgan is ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Tracy Caldwell, with the help of the closeout crew, goes through final preparation of her launch and entry suit before she enters Space Shuttle Endeavour.  The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2280

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Tracy Caldwell, with the help of the closeout crew, goes through final preparation of her launch and entry suit be... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Dave Williams is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour.  Williams represents the Canadian Space Agency. The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2284

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Mission Specialist Dave Williams is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. Willi... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Commander Scott Kelly is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2278

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, ST...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Commander Scott Kelly is helped with his launch gear by the closeout crew before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. The outer end of t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --   In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Pilot Charlie Hobaugh is helped by the closeout crew with his parachute before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour.  The outer end of the orbiter access arm ends in an environmental chamber (the White Room) that mates with the orbiter and allows personnel to enter the crew compartment.  With assistance, each member of the flight crew dons a parachute pack before crawling through the open hatch into the shuttle.  The closeout crew also straps the astronauts into the space shuttle's crew module and takes care of any other last-minute needs that arise.   Space Shuttle Endeavour's STS-118 mission is the 22nd shuttle flight to the International Space Station. It will continue space station construction by delivering a third starboard truss segment, S5, and other payloads such as the SPACEHAB module and the external stowage platform 3.  Liftoff of Endeavour is scheduled at 6:36 p.m. EDT.  Photo credit: NASA/John Kechele, Scott Haun, Tom Farrar KSC-07pp2279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, S...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-118 Pilot Charlie Hobaugh is helped by the closeout crew with his parachute before he enters Space Shuttle Endeavour. The outer end of t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   In the Vehicle Assembly Building's high bay 4 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the simulator crew module for the Ares I-X rocket joins other rocket segments on the floor.  The crew module is part of the hardware that will be used in the launch of Ares I-X. Also arriving is a launch abort system that, with the module, will form the tip of the rocket. Ares I-X is the test flight for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I. The launch of the 321-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X, targeted for July 2009, will be the first in a series of unpiloted rocket launches from Kennedy. When fully developed, the 16-foot diameter crew module will furnish living space and reentry protection for the astronauts, while their launch abort system will provide safe evacuation if a launch vehicle failure occurs.   Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1418

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building's high bay 4...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Vehicle Assembly Building's high bay 4 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the simulator crew module for the Ares I-X rocket joins other rocket segments on the floor. The... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –    The yellow framework seen here is the lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" that will have the ability to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for the Ares I-X rocket and to stack and de-stack the assembly from the Service Module/Spacecraft Adapter assembly.  It will also have the ability to lift and to stack and de-stack Stack-5  (all of the above components) from the Ares I-X in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ares I-X is the test flight for the Ares I.   The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I. The launch of the 321-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X, targeted for July 2009, will be the first in a series of unpiloted rocket launches from Kennedy. When fully developed, the 16-foot diameter crew module will furnish living space and reentry protection for the astronauts, while their launch abort system will provide safe evacuation if a launch vehicle failure occurs.   Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1420

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The yellow framework seen here is the liftin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The yellow framework seen here is the lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" that will have the ability to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –   The yellow framework at center is the lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" that will have the ability to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for the Ares I-X rocket and to stack and de-stack the assembly from the Service Module/Spacecraft Adapter assembly.  It will also have the ability to lift and to stack and de-stack Stack-5  (all of the above components) from the Ares I-X flight test vehicle in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ares I-X is the test flight for the Ares I.   The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I. The launch of the 321-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X, targeted for July 2009, will be the first in a series of unpiloted rocket launches from Kennedy. When fully developed, the 16-foot diameter crew module will furnish living space and reentry protection for the astronauts, while their launch abort system will provide safe evacuation if a launch vehicle failure occurs.   Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1419

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The yellow framework at center is the lifting...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The yellow framework at center is the lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" that will have the ability to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" is lifted by a crane to test the load capability.  The Birdcage will be used to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for the Ares I-X rocket and to stack and de-stack the assembly from the Service Module/Spacecraft Adapter assembly.  It will also have the ability to lift and to stack and de-stack Stack-5  (all of the above components) from the Ares I-X in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  Ares I-X is the test flight for the Ares I.   The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I. The launch of the 321-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X, targeted for July 2009, will be the first in a series of unpiloted rocket launches from Kennedy. When fully developed, the 16-foot diameter crew module will furnish living space and reentry protection for the astronauts, while their launch abort system will provide safe evacuation if a launch vehicle failure occurs.   Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1422

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" i...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" is lifted by a crane to test the load capability. The Birdcage will be used to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS,... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –  The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" is lifted by a crane to test the load capability.  The Birdcage will be used to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for the Ares I-X rocket and to stack and de-stack the assembly from the Service Module/Spacecraft Adapter assembly.  It will also have the ability to lift and to stack and de-stack Stack-5  (all of the above components) from the Ares I-X in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Ares I-X is the test flight for the Ares I.   The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I. The launch of the 321-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X, targeted for July 2009, will be the first in a series of unpiloted rocket launches from Kennedy. When fully developed, the 16-foot diameter crew module will furnish living space and reentry protection for the astronauts, while their launch abort system will provide safe evacuation if a launch vehicle failure occurs.   Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-1421

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" i...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The lifting fixture nicknamed the "Birdcage" is lifted by a crane to test the load capability. The Birdcage will be used to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS,... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––  In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at left, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted high above the floor for a fit check with the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly nearby for the Ares I-X rocket.   Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at left, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted high above the floor for a fi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––  In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for a fit check.  Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2799

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and La... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for a fit check.  Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2800

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Lau... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––  In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for a fit check.  Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2798

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework , nicknamed the "birdcage," is lowered over the Crew Module, or CM, and La... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––   In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at center will undergo a fit check.  Nicknamed the "birdcage," it is the lifting fixture that will have the ability to lift the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly for the Ares I-X rocket. Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2794

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildi...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at center will undergo a fit check. Nicknamed the "birdcage," it is the ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––  In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at left, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted for a fit check with the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly in the foreground for the Ares I-X rocket.  Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2795

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at left, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted for a fit check with the Crew... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ––  In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at top, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted high above the floor for a fit check with the Crew Module, or CM, and Launch Abort System, or LAS, assembly at lower left for the Ares I-X rocket. Ares I-X is the flight test for the Ares I. The I-X flight will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with Ares I.  The launch of the 327-foot-tall, full-scale Ares I-X is targeted for July 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2797

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Buildin...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the yellow framework at top, nicknamed the "birdcage," is lifted high above the floor for a fit... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, various segments of the Ares I-X are placed around the floor.  In the center is a second roll control system module that will be installed in one of the segments.  At left is the yellow metal framework, called the "birdcage," surrounding the simulator launch abort system and crew module. Ares I-X is the test vehicle for the Ares I, which is part of the Constellation Program to return men to the moon and beyond. Ares I-X is targeted for launch in August 2009.  Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-2895

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In High Bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, various segments of the Ares I-X are placed around the floor. In the center is a second roll co... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) undergoes modal survey testing after sensors were placed on the stack. The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor. Other segments are stacked nearby.  Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3351

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) undergoes modal survey testing after sensors were place... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians place sensors on the top part of the Ares I-X for modal survey testing.  The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor.  Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3346

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians place sensors on the top part of the Ares I-X for modal survey testing. The top cons... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) is ready for modal survey testing.  The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor. Other segments are stacked nearby.  Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3348

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) is ready for modal survey testing. The top consists of... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin the modal survey testing on the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) after sensors were placed on the stack. The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor. Other segments are stacked nearby.   Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3350

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin the modal survey testing on the top part of the Ares I-X (upper left) after sen... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians place sensors on the top part of the Ares I-X for modal survey testing.  The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor. Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3347

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians place sensors on the top part of the Ares I-X for modal survey testing. The top cons... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin the modal survey testing on the top part of the Ares I-X (center) after sensors were placed on the stack. The top consists of the launch abort tower, crew module, service module and spacecraft adaptor.  Shakers will impose random loads/vibrations to determine the flight test vehicle’s first several bending modes and the strategically located sensors throughout the stacks will measure the amount, acceleration and direction of movement. The purpose of the testing is to confirm that Ares I-X will behave as predicted as it lifts off the pad and powers through the initial stage of flight in a demonstration flight later this year.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-3349

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians begin the modal survey testing on the top part of the Ares I-X (center) after sensors... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X management team reviews consensus for stacking and mating of the I-X upper stage segments.  Steve Davis, deputy mission manager, provides a slide presentation of the Crew Module.  Launch of the Ares I-X flight test is targeted no earlier than Aug. 30 from Launch Pad 39B.  Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system that eventually will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system.  Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-3874

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Ares I-X management team reviews consensus for stacking and mating of the I-X upper stage segments. Steve Davis, deputy mission manager, pr... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers lower a "fish pole" lifting fixture toward space shuttle Discovery's payload bay.  The fixture will be used to remove the gaseous nitrogen pressure tank during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6097

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers lower a "fish pole" lifting fixture toward space shuttle Discovery's payload ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers attach a "fish pole" lifting fixture to the gaseous nitrogen tank in space shuttle Discovery's payload bay.  The tank is being removed during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6099

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers attach a "fish pole" lifting fixture to the gaseous nitrogen tank in space sh... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers guide a "fish pole" lifting fixture being lowered by crane toward space shuttle Discovery's payload bay.  The fixture will be used to remove the gaseous nitrogen tank during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6098

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance workers guide a "fish pole" lifting fixture being lowered by crane toward space shutt... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the gaseous nitrogen tank has been removed from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6102

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the gaseous nitrogen tank has been removed from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay during processing for... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the gaseous nitrogen tank in space shuttle Discovery's payload bay is attached to a "fish pole" lifting fixture and ready to be hoisted out of the bay.  The tank is being removed during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6100

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the gaseous nitrogen tank in space shuttle Discovery's payload bay is attached to a "fish pole" lifting fix... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lifts the gaseous nitrogen tank from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay with the aid of a "fish pole" lifting fixture.  The tank is being removed during processing for the shuttle's STS-131 mission to the International Space Station.    The tanks are used for atmosphere conditioning and for moving potable water in the crew module.  The seven-member STS-131 crew will deliver a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks to be transferred to laboratories on the station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module. This will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. Launch is targeted for March 18, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-6101

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lifts the gaseous nitrogen tank from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay with the aid of a "fish ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, does his part in the removal of window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1081

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, does his part in the removal of window #8 from th... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, works inside the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis following removal of window #8.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1083

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, works inside the crew module of space shuttle Atl... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying prone on a work platform, prepares to remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1079

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying prone on a work platform, prepares to remove window #8 from the top o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians, lying on a work platform, remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1082

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians, lying on a work platform, remove window #8 from the top of the crew module o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, takes steps to remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1080

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, takes steps to remove window #8 from the top of t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, for their mission.  From left in the blue flight suits, Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson, Rick Mastracchio, Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, and Naoko Yamazaki of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency; Commander Alan Poindexter; and Pilot James P. Dutton Jr. get a close look at the exterior of the windows on Discovery's crew module.    The CEIT provides the crew with hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The seven-member crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with resupply stowage platforms and racks to be transferred to locations around the International Space Station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module.  Discovery's launch is targeted for March 18.  For information on the STS-131 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts131/index.html.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2010-1132

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, for their mission.  Here, Commander Alan Poindexter inspects the windows in Discovery's cockpit from inside the crew module.    The CEIT provides the crew with hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The seven-member crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with resupply stowage platforms and racks to be transferred to locations around the International Space Station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module.  Discovery's launch is targeted for March 18.  For information on the STS-131 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts131/index.html.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2010-1133

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, for their mission.  Here, Pilot James P. Dutton Jr. experiences the feel of the cockpit from inside the crew module.    The CEIT provides the crew with hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The seven-member crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with resupply stowage platforms and racks to be transferred to locations around the International Space Station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module.  Discovery's launch is targeted for March 18.  For information on the STS-131 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts131/index.html.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2010-1134

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, for their mission.  Here, Mission Specialists Naoko Yamazaki of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Clay Anderson, kneeling, get a close look at the exterior of a window on Discovery's crew module.    The CEIT provides the crew with hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The seven-member crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with resupply stowage platforms and racks to be transferred to locations around the International Space Station.  Three spacewalks will include work to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly to the station's exterior and return a European experiment from outside the station's Columbus module.  Discovery's launch is targeted for March 18.  For information on the STS-131 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts131/index.html.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2010-1131

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of space shuttle Discovery's STS-131 crew participate in training activities during the Crew Equipment ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, is carefully inspected by United Space Alliance technicians.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1201

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, is carefully inspected by United Space ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician diligently inspects window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, for any anomaly.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1202

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician diligently inspects window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlanti... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians discuss the condition of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for inspection.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1203

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians discuss the condition of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atl... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, undergoes a thorough inspection by United Space Alliance technicians.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1200

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, undergoes a thorough inspection by Unit... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians inspect window #8 which was removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1199

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians inspect window #8 which was removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' c... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8 is installed on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module after a thorough inspection.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1231

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8 is installed on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module after a thorough inspection. Inspectio... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians ensure that the opening on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for window #8 is ready for installation of the window.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1230

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians ensure that the opening on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for win... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians clean the opening where window #8 will be installed on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1229

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians clean the opening where window #8 will be installed on the top of space shutt... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the inspection of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1227

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the inspection of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle A... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician prepares to install window #8 on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1228

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician prepares to install window #8 on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew mod... more

Orion Crew Module KSC Ground Ops Pathfinder

Orion Crew Module KSC Ground Ops Pathfinder

Orion Crew Module KSC Ground Ops Pathfinder Work continues on the fabrication of the Orion Crew Module KSC Ground Operations pathfinder in building 1232A at NASA Langley.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test Facility's 6,000-square-foot high bay. The prototype is used to demonstrate the safe disconnect and retraction of ground umbilical plates and associated hardware of a launch vehicle's upper stage and service module. The Environmental Control System consists of regulated air, which would be used to purge an inner tank and crew module.     Since 1977, the facility has supported NASA’s Launch Services, shuttle, International Space Station, and Constellation programs, as well as commercial providers. The facility recently underwent a major upgrade to support even more programs, projects and customers. It houses a cable fabrication and molding shop, pneumatics shop, machine and weld shop and full-scale control room. Outside, the facility features a water flow test loop, vehicle motion simulator, 600-ton test fixture, launch simulation towers and a cryogenic system. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-5290

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, tes...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test Facility's 6,000-square-foot high bay. The prototype is used to demonstrate the safe disconnect and retraction of ground umbilical plates and associated hardware of a launch vehicle's upper stage and service module. The Environmental Control System consists of regulated air, which would be used to purge an inner tank and crew module.         Since 1977, the facility has supported NASA’s Launch Services, shuttle, International Space Station, and Constellation programs, as well as commercial providers. The facility recently underwent a major upgrade to support even more programs, projects and customers. It houses a cable fabrication and molding shop, pneumatics shop, machine and weld shop and full-scale control room. Outside, the facility features a water flow test loop, vehicle motion simulator, 600-ton test fixture, launch simulation towers and a cryogenic system. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-5291

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, tes...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test Facility's 6,000-square-foot high bay. The prototype is used to demonstrate the safe disconnect and retraction of ground umbilical plates and associated hardware of a launch vehicle's upper stage and service module. The Environmental Control System consists of regulated air, which would be used to purge an inner tank and crew module.     Since 1977, the facility has supported NASA’s Launch Services, shuttle, International Space Station, and Constellation programs, as well as commercial providers. The facility recently underwent a major upgrade to support even more programs, projects and customers. It houses a cable fabrication and molding shop, pneumatics shop, machine and weld shop and full-scale control room. Outside, the facility features a water flow test loop, vehicle motion simulator, 600-ton test fixture, launch simulation towers and a cryogenic system. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-5293

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, tes...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test Facility's 6,000-square-foot high bay. The prototype is used to demonstrate the safe disconnect and retraction of ground umbilical plates and associated hardware of a launch vehicle's upper stage and service module. The Environmental Control System consists of regulated air, which would be used to purge an inner tank and crew module.       Since 1977, the facility has supported NASA’s Launch Services, shuttle, International Space Station, and Constellation programs, as well as commercial providers. The facility recently underwent a major upgrade to support even more programs, projects and customers. It houses a cable fabrication and molding shop, pneumatics shop, machine and weld shop and full-scale control room. Outside, the facility features a water flow test loop, vehicle motion simulator, 600-ton test fixture, launch simulation towers and a cryogenic system. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-5292

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, tes...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, testing of the Tilt-Up Umbilical Arm (TUUA) prototype's Environmental Control System Quick Disconnect takes place in the Launch Equipment Test ... more

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment

Crew Module Water Landing Model Assessment (CMWLMA) Test site photos at Aberdeen Test Center Aberdeen Maryland