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cool

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Courtesan Enjoying a Cool Summer
 Evening

Courtesan Enjoying a Cool Summer Evening

Ogawa Haritsu (Ritsuō) (Japanese, 1663–1747) Edo period (1615–1868)

Enjoying the Evening Cool at Nakasu

Enjoying the Evening Cool at Nakasu

Torii Kiyonaga (Japanese, 1752–1815) Edo period (1615–1868)

In the Cool of the Evening in the Vicinity of Lord Nabeshima's Warehouses (Furyu Nabeshima yusuzumi)

In the Cool of the Evening in the Vicinity of Lord Nabeshima's Warehou...

Jukakudō Masakuni (Japanese, active 1820s) Edo period (1615–1868)

Cool, [Blank] - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]
Mme Berger..., [Luchon], 25 juillet 1899

Mme Berger..., [Luchon], 25 juillet 1899

Fonds Trutat - Photographie ancienne..Cote : TRU C 5.Localisation : Fonds ancien.Original non communicable..Titre : Mme Berger..., [Luchon], 25 juillet 1899..Auteur : Trutat, Eugène.Rôle de l’auteur : Photograp... more

Cool

Cool

Photograph shows Cornell University football player William Cameron "Gib" Cool. (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2011)

Cool Your Home with Ventilation: Floor Display in Chattanooga, Tennessee

Cool Your Home with Ventilation: Floor Display in Chattanooga, Tenness...

This is a photograph of a floor display encouraging the use of electric forms of ventilation. Display Poster Chartorama

A barge small enough to carry equipment and supplies to the beach is loaded with cargo from a larger craft during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

A barge small enough to carry equipment and supplies to the beach is l...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

A forklift destined for a government installation on the island is hoisted from the deck of a barge during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

A forklift destined for a government installation on the island is hoi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Shemya Island State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed... more

APUTCO employee Fred Longabaugh hooks up a hose from a fuel barge to the connection on a tanker truck during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

APUTCO employee Fred Longabaugh hooks up a hose from a fuel barge to t...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

APUTCO employees Randy Daniels, foreground, and George Rossi haul a hose onto the beach from a fuel barge during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

APUTCO employees Randy Daniels, foreground, and George Rossi haul a ho...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

Barge 570 approaches the pier with a load of equipment destined for government installations on the island during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570 approaches the pier with a load of equipment destined for go...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Shemya Island State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed... more

Barge 570 heads for Point Barrow, Alaska, carrying equipment and supplies destined for government installations in the area during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570 heads for Point Barrow, Alaska, carrying equipment and suppl...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Country: Beaufort Sea Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed Boyce, USAF Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

A barge lies at the water's edge with a load of fuel for government installations in the area during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

A barge lies at the water's edge with a load of fuel for government in...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

Barge 570 tied up at the city's docks, where surplus equipment picked up during COOL BARGE '88 from government installations scattered throughout the state will be offloaded. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570 tied up at the city's docks, where surplus equipment picked ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Anchorage State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed Boy... more

A shelter is lifted off the Barge 570 during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

A shelter is lifted off the Barge 570 during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARG...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Shemya Island State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed... more

Barge 570 lies offshore as a smaller barge that is ferrying equipment to the beach is unloaded during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570 lies offshore as a smaller barge that is ferrying equipment ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

Barge 570, loaded with equipment destined for government installations on the island, is pulled to the pier by a commercial tug during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570, loaded with equipment destined for government installations...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Shemya Island State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed... more

Barge 570, approaches the point's black sand beach carrying equipment and supplies for government installations in the area during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570, approaches the point's black sand beach carrying equipment ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

Workers haul hoses onto the deck of a barge after offloading fuel during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Workers haul hoses onto the deck of a barge after offloading fuel duri...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed ... more

Barge 570 departs Point Barrow, Alaska, after unloading supplies and equipment during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570 departs Point Barrow, Alaska, after unloading supplies and e...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Country: Beaufort Sea Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed Boyce, USAF Release Status: Released to Public Combined M... more

Ray Brown, an employee of APUTCO, sits on an all-terrain vehicle as he supervises the offloading of a fuel barge during Cool Barge '88. Cool Barge operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Ray Brown, an employee of APUTCO, sits on an all-terrain vehicle as he...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Point Barrow State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT. Ed... more

Barge 570, loaded with equipment destined for government installations on the island, lies tied up at the pier during COOL BARGE '88. COOL BARGE operations, through which remote government sites in Alaska are resupplied, are managed by the Air Force's Water Port Logistics Office in Seattle. The actual delivery of supplies is handled by APUTCO, a civilian contractor

Barge 570, loaded with equipment destined for government installations...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: COOL BARGE '88 Base: Shemya Island State: Alaska (AK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Ed... more

Artwork: "Cool or Hot" Vietnam, 1970. Artist: David E. Graves. Catalog Number: 1.138.87

Artwork: "Cool or Hot" Vietnam, 1970. Artist: David E. Graves. Catalog...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

AFIS BILLBOARD POSTERS. COOL NAMES FOR WOMEN? SEXUAL HARASSMENT AWARENESS. DEFENSE BILLBOARD #49

AFIS BILLBOARD POSTERS. COOL NAMES FOR WOMEN? SEXUAL HARASSMENT AWAREN...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

The Marine Corps' Silent Drill Platoon performed at

The Marine Corps' Silent Drill Platoon performed at

The Marine Corps' Silent Drill Platoon performed at Winnacunnet High School in Hampton, N.H., June 22, 2011. Members of the Silent Drill Platoon are handpicked to represent the Marine Corps. Through intense pra... more

MAJ. Gen. Abd-al-Razzaq, Baghdad Police CHIEF, discusses election matters with Cool. Richard Swengros, Commander, 42nd Military Police Brigade.  Swengros and Abd-al-Razzaq have been working together to ensure a successful and secure election process for the people of Baghdad and surrounding areas. (U.S. Army photo by PFC. Laura M. Bigenho) (Released)

MAJ. Gen. Abd-al-Razzaq, Baghdad Police CHIEF, discusses election matt...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Baghdad Country: Iraq (IRQ) Scene Major Command Shown: SOUTHEAST Scene Camera Operator: PFC Laura M. Bigenho, USA Release Status: Released to Pu... more

Cool Texture

Cool Texture

The erosion of the western rim of Hellas Basin has exposed a surface composed of layered material NASA/JPL/ASU

Cool Crater

Cool Crater

This unnamed crater east of Herschel Crater contains both a large landslide and a field of small dark sand dunes NASA/JPL/ASU

Pacific Shows Signs of Morphing From Warm El Nino To Cool La Nina

Pacific Shows Signs of Morphing From Warm El Nino To Cool La Nina

New data of sea-level heights from early February, 2007, by the Jason altimetric satellite show that the tropical Pacific Ocean has transitioned from a warm El Niño to a cool La Niña condition during the prior ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --   Alligators bask in the warm sun on the banks of the Launch Complex 39 turn basin at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  Cool weather frequently brings the gators out of the water.  A protected species, alligators can be spotted in the drainage canals and other waters surrounding Kennedy.  The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island Wildlife Nature Refuge, which is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-08pd3863

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Alligators bask in the warm sun on the banks...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Alligators bask in the warm sun on the banks of the Launch Complex 39 turn basin at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Cool weather frequently brings the gators out of the water.... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, high-density foam insulation between the concrete layers of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6802

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, high-density foam insulation between the concrete layers of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, concrete layers on either side of the high-density foam insulation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, concrete layers on either side of the high-density foam insulation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured into the trenches that will provide the foundation for the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6794

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured into the trenches that will ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured into the trenches that will provide the foundation for the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility get a layer of high-density foam insulation.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6801

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility get a layer of high-density foam insulation. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6793

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the w...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete is poured over the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6797

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the Propellants North Administr...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility will have a two-story ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6799

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants N...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Construction of the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up constructio... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6795

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Concrete covers the insulation in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Trenches are prepared to support the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6798

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Trenches are prepared to support the walls of t...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Trenches are prepared to support the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-6800

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Prope...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Insulation is placed in the walls for the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. A tilt-up constructi... more

Cool Globes

Cool Globes

A visitor inspects the Cool Globes exhibition at Crissy Field.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker is seen through an opening left for a doorway in a newly erected wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1113

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker is seen through an opening left for a doorway in a newly erected wall of the Propellants North Administrative and ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the first wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place.  In the background is the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1106

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the first wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place. In the background is... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lowered into the trench which will support it.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1110

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lowered into the trench which will sup... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, reminiscent of a barn-raising, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility springs into being in a single day as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1121

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, reminiscent of a barn-raising, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility springs into being in a single... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into an upright position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1107

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers lift one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into an upright position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, man and machine work side by side to position the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, man and machine work side by side to position the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1111

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the final shape of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility becomes apparent as its walls are erected.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1120

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the final shape of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility becomes apparent as its walls are erected.... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is enlisted to lift the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1115

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is enlisted to lift the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into position. A ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, steady progress is made by a team of construction workers to erect the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1119

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, steady progress is made by a team of construction workers to erect the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Ma... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1112

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility begins to take shape as its walls are lifted into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in the background, is witness to the formation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, a new "green" building under construction in Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.  Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1114

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, in the background, is witness to the formation of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, a new "green" building under ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a row of walls is erected as the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility takes shape.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1118

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a row of walls is erected as the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility takes shape. A tilt-up constr... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of construction workers ensures that the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility are installed properly.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1117

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of construction workers ensures that the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility are ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers guide one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into place.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1109

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers guide one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility into place. A tilt-up co... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility glides through the air into position.    A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1108

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of the walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility glides through the air into position. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers survey the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1158

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction workers survey the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility. Conc... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1156

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is lifted into place. Concrete la... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the placement of the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, the "barn-raising" of the new "green" facility is complete.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1159

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the placement of the last outside wall of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility, the "barn-rai... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, all of the exterior walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility have been lifted into place.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1157

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, all of the exterior walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility have been lifted into place. ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this crane raised all of the outside walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility over a period of two days.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1160

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this crane raised all of the outside walls of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility over a period o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is moving ahead with the placement of all of the outside walls complete.    Concrete layers on either side of high-density foam insulation in the facility's walls will prevent any transfer of radiant heat between the exterior and interior of the buildings.  A tilt-up construction method is being used to erect a THERMOMASS concrete wall insulation system for the facility's walls.  In this approach, the exterior layer of concrete for the wall panels is poured and leveled on the building's footprint. Then, prefabricated, predrilled insulation sheets are arranged on top of the unhardened concrete, and connectors, designed to hold the sandwiched layers of concrete and insulation secure, are inserted through the predrilled holes. Next, the structural wythe is poured.  Once cured, these panels are lifted upright to form the building's envelope.  The facility will have a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy adjacent to an 1,800-square-foot single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment.  The new facility will feature high-efficiency roofs and walls, “Cool Dry Quiet” air conditioning with energy recovery technology, efficient lighting, and other sustainable features. The facility is striving to qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, Platinum certification. If successful, Propellants North will be the first Kennedy facility to achieve this highest of LEED ratings after it is completed in the summer of 2010.  The facility was designed for NASA by Jones Edmunds and Associates.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1161

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Ce...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Launch Complex 39 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, construction of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility is moving ahead with the placement of all of ... more

Cool as a Stellar Cucumber

Cool as a Stellar Cucumber

This image from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope using infrared light shows what astronomers think is one of the coldest brown dwarfs discovered so far red dot in middle of frame. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Electric Cars

Electric Cars

Fleet sizes have been reduced and conventional vehicles replaced with fuel/energy efficient models.

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, awaits rollout for mating to the L-1011 Orbital carrier aircraft.  Previously, the spacecraft was mated with its Pegasus XL rocket and enclosed in the Pegasus payload fairing.  Cool, dry air is being pumped into the fairing through a purge line to maintain the proper environment for the spacecraft in the confined space.    The fairing will protect the spacecraft from the heat and aerodynamic pressure generated during the rocket’s ascent to orbit.  After processing of the rocket and spacecraft are complete, they will be flown on Orbital's L-1011 carrier aircraft from Vandenberg to the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on the Pacific Ocean’s Kwajalein Atoll for launch in March. The high-energy x-ray telescope will conduct a census of black holes, map radioactive material in young supernovae remnants, and study the origins of cosmic rays and the extreme physics around collapsed stars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nustar.  Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB KSC-2012-1696

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences proces...

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, awaits rollout for mating... more

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, preparations to launch NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, are nearly complete. The spacecraft has been mated with its Pegasus XL rocket and enclosed in the Pegasus payload fairing.  Cool, dry air is being pumped into the fairing through a purge line to maintain the proper environment for the spacecraft in the confined space.    The fairing will protect the spacecraft from the heat and aerodynamic pressure generated during the rocket’s ascent to orbit.  After processing of the rocket and spacecraft are complete, they will be flown on Orbital's L-1011 carrier aircraft from Vandenberg to the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on the Pacific Ocean’s Kwajalein Atoll for launch in March. The high-energy x-ray telescope will conduct a census of black holes, map radioactive material in young supernovae remnants, and study the origins of cosmic rays and the extreme physics around collapsed stars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nustar.  Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB KSC-2012-1697

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences proces...

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Inside the Orbital Sciences processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, preparations to launch NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, ar... more

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – In Orbital Science’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, an Orbital technician consults documentation to ensure that all steps in the transfer of an Pegasus XL rocket onto the transporter are properly executed.  The rocket is mated to NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, telescope, encapsulated in the Pegasus payload fairing.  Cool, dry air is being pumped into the fairing through a purge line to maintain the proper environment for the spacecraft in the confined space.     The transporter will move them to the runway ramp where they will be attached to the underside of Orbital’s L-1011 carrier aircraft. The aircraft will fly the pair from Vandenberg to the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on the Pacific Ocean’s Kwajalein Atoll for launch. A revised launch date will be set at the Flight Readiness Review, planned for later this week. The high-energy X-ray telescope will conduct a census of black holes, map radioactive material in young supernovae remnants, and study the origins of cosmic rays and the extreme physics around collapsed stars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nustar.  Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB KSC-2012-1770

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – In Orbital Science’s hangar at Van...

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – In Orbital Science’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, an Orbital technician consults documentation to ensure that all steps in the transfer of an Pegasus XL... more

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations are in work to transfer an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket onto the transporter in Orbital’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  The rocket has been mated to NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, encapsulated in the Pegasus payload fairing.  Cool, dry air is being pumped into the fairing through a purge line to maintain the proper environment for the spacecraft in the confined space.    The transporter will move them to the runway ramp where they will be attached to the underside of Orbital’s L-1011 carrier aircraft. The aircraft will fly the pair from Vandenberg to the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on the Pacific Ocean’s Kwajalein Atoll for launch. A revised launch date will be set at the Flight Readiness Review, planned for later this week. The high-energy X-ray telescope will conduct a census of black holes, map radioactive material in young supernovae remnants, and study the origins of cosmic rays and the extreme physics around collapsed stars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nustar.  Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB KSC-2012-1768

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations are in work to transfer...

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations are in work to transfer an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket onto the transporter in Orbital’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The rocket has ... more

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations begin to transfer an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket onto the transporter in Orbital’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  The rocket has been mated to NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, encapsulated in the Pegasus payload fairing.  Cool, dry air is being pumped into the fairing through a purge line to maintain the proper environment for the spacecraft in the confined space.    The transporter will move them to the runway ramp where they will be attached to the underside of Orbital’s L-1011 carrier aircraft. The aircraft will fly the pair from Vandenberg to the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site on the Pacific Ocean’s Kwajalein Atoll for launch. A revised launch date will be set at the Flight Readiness Review, planned for later this week. The high-energy X-ray telescope will conduct a census of black holes, map radioactive material in young supernovae remnants, and study the origins of cosmic rays and the extreme physics around collapsed stars. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/nustar.  Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin, VAFB KSC-2012-1767

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations begin to transfer an Or...

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Operations begin to transfer an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket onto the transporter in Orbital’s hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The rocket has been m... more

Cygnus-X: The Cool Swan Glowing in Flight

Cygnus-X: The Cool Swan Glowing in Flight

This new view of the Cygnus-X star-formation region by ESA Herschel Space Observatory highlights chaotic networks of dust and gas that point to sites of massive star formation. ESA/PACS/SPIRE/Martin Hennemann &... more

Soldiers from the 3rd Long Range Surveillance Detachment,

Soldiers from the 3rd Long Range Surveillance Detachment,

Soldiers from the 3rd Long Range Surveillance Detachment, Company C, 1st Squadron, 38th Cavalry, 525th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, XVIII Airborne Corps, conduct fast rope insertion certifications as part ... more

Cool Andromeda

Cool Andromeda

In this new view of the Andromeda, also known as M31, galaxy from the Herschel space observatory, cool lanes of forming stars are revealed in the finest detail yet. M31 is the nearest major galaxy to our own Mi... more

This Image Is Cool!

This Image Is Cool!

This Image Is Cool! NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

A German Air Force AG-51 Tornado flies over the runway

A German Air Force AG-51 Tornado flies over the runway

A German Air Force AG-51 Tornado flies over the runway at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, as another Tornado and Luftwaffe Jamkite taxi toward their parking spots, Oct. 10, 2013, during exercise Mountain R... more

Cool Shadow

Cool Shadow

The shadow of Saturn cuts across the rings as seen by NASA Cassini spacecraft. As the ring particles enter Saturn shadow, their temperature drops to even colder temperatures, only to warm back up again when the... more