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First Views of Pluto

First Views of Pluto

Description (October 4, 1990) The following information was published along with the image in 1990, prior to Pluto having been stripped of its title as a planet:..NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has obtained the ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is offloaded from the Russian cargo plane.  The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2274

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is offloaded from the Russian cargo plane. The fair... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket has been moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2269

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical positio...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket has been moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Com... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft are driven away from NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility.  They are being transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2277

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Atlas V fairing halves for the New ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft are driven away from NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility. They are being transported to Astrotech Spac... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket has been moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2270

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical positio...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket has been moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Com... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is being moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2268

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical positio...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is being moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Com... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft have been offloaded from the Russian cargo plane (background).  The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2273

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft have been offloaded from the Russian cargo plane (backgroun... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is moved away from the Russian cargo plane that delivered it.  Behind the truck is the mate/demate device at the landing facility.  The fairing halves will be transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2275

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, one of the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft is moved away from the Russian cargo plane that deli... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is nearly vertical.  The rocket will be moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2266

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is nearly vertical. The rocket will be moved into the Vertical Integration Facility ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, a worker stands by as the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is raised to vertical.  The rocket will then be moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch.  The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2265

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, a worker stands by as the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is raised to vertical. The rocket will then be moved into the ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft are being covered by a protective container before their transport to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility.  A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2276

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, the Atlas V fairing halves for the New Horizons spacecraft are being covered by a protective container before their tr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is lifted off the transporter.  The rocket will be raised to vertical and then moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2264

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is lifted off the transporter. The rocket will be raised to vertical and then moved ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A Russian cargo plane sits on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center with the Atlas V fairing for the New Horizons spacecraft inside.  The two fairing halves will be removed, loaded onto trucks and transported to Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville.  The fairing later will be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. A fairing protects a spacecraft during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once in space, it is jettisoned. The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2271

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Russian cargo plane sits on the Shuttl...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Russian cargo plane sits on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center with the Atlas V fairing for the New Horizons spacecraft inside. The two fairing halves wil... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is being moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The Lockheed Martin Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, which is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2267

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical positio...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After being raised to a vertical position, the first stage of an Atlas V rocket is being moved into the Vertical Integration Facility to begin preparations for launch on Launch Com... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket are driven to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2283

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The fairing halves for the Lockheed Mar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket are driven to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock. The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spa... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   After arriving at the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, the protective cover is removed from one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2286

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After arriving at the Payload Hazardous...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After arriving at the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, the protective cover is removed from one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket. The Atlas... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   One of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket arrives at the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2284

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - One of the fairing halves for the Lockh...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - One of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket arrives at the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock. The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is lifted off the transporter.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2287

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Fa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is lifted off the transporter. The Atlas V is the launch v... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is raised to a vertical position.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2288

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Fa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is raised to a vertical position. The Atlas V is the launc... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is suspended vertically.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned. New Horizons is designed to make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2289

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Fa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the Payload Hazardous Service Facility airlock, one of the fairing halves for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket is suspended vertically. The Atlas V is the launch vehicle... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians are installing the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2306

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians are installing the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft. Ne... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is moved after being lifted from a stand. The fairing encapsulates the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is mo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is lifted from a stand. The fairing encapsulates the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is lifted from a stand. The fairing ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, both parts of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft are moved into place for encapsulation.  The fairing encloses the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere. Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2308

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Paylo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, both parts of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument that is part of the New Horizons spacecraft. New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument that is part of the New Horizons spacecraf... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument is tested after being mounted on the corner of the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2310

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Paylo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument is tested after being mounted on the corner of the New Horizo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians are installing the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians are installing the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft. Ne... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is moved into place for encapsulation. The fairing encloses the spacecraft to protect it during launch and flight through the atmosphere.  Once out of the atmosphere, the fairing is jettisoned.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2307

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payloa...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, one part of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket fairing to be placed around the New Horizons spacecraft is mo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument has been mounted on the corner of the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind.  New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2309

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Paylo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument has been mounted on the corner of the New Horizons spacecraft... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2313

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft. A series of interconnecting p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory works on the New Horizons spacecraft before installing one of the panels.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2312

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory works on the New Horizons spacecraft before installing one of... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2315

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft. A serie... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2314

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory install another panel on the New Horizons spacecraft. A serie... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacecraft.  A series of interconnecting panels will enclose the spacecraft beneath the antenna to maintain safe operating temperatures in space. New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2311

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory work on a panel they are installing on the New Horizons spacec... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers wait for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage (above) to be lowered to the first stage for installation.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2322

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers wait for the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage (above) to be lowered... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   In front of the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is raised off the transporter.  Once vertical, the Centaur, the second stage of the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, will be lifted up the tower and mated with the waiting first stage, seen at left.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2318

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the mobile service tower on...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is raised off the transporter. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In front of the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers complete the raising of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage to a vertical position.  The second stage of the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft, the Centaur will be mated with the waiting first stage, seen behind it at left.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2319

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the mobile service tower on ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In front of the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers complete the raising of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is moved into place over the waiting first stage below it.  The launch vehicle for the New Horizon spacecraft, the Atlas V first and second stages will be mated.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2321

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is moved into place over the waiting ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage leaves the Astrotech Space Operations Center in Titusville, Fla., for the short journey to Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The Centaur is the second stage of the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2316

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur sta...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage leaves the Astrotech Space Operations Center in Titusville, Fla., for the short journey to Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -   The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage arrives at the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.  The Centaur is the second stage of the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft. Seen in the tower is the first stage.   New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2317

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur sta...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage arrives at the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Centaur is the second stage... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers oversee the lowering of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage (above) toward the first stage.  The two stages will be mated.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the New Horizons spacecraft.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2323

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, workers oversee the lowering of the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage (above... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is lifted up the mobile service tower where it will be mated with the waiting first stage, seen behind it at left.  New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2320

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Lockheed Martin Atlas V Centaur stage is lifted up the mobile service tower where it will be mated with the... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers prepare the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket for mating of the solid rocket boosters. In the foreground is the trailer used to transport the boosters to the pad.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for the Pluto-bound New Horizons spacecraft that will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and its moon, Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon’s surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and Charon in July 2015. KSC-05pd2393

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral A...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - On Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers prepare the Lockheed Martin Atlas V rocket for mating of the solid rocket boosters. In the foreground is the trail... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is ready for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Seen behind the spacecraft is one half of the fairing that will enclose it for launch, scheduled for January 2006.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2414

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is ready for a media event. Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Tim Frazier, Mervin Smith and Tim Hoye inspect the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after its arrival.  Frazier is with the Department of Energy, which has provided the radioisotope, and Hoye is with Lockheed Martin.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2427

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Tim Frazier, Mervin Smith and Tim Hoye inspect the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after its arrival. Frazier is with t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts the blanket that is being installed as a heat shield around the New Horizons spacecraft.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2407a

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts the blanket that is being installed as a heat shield ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is moved toward the door of the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2421

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The container holding the radioisotope th...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is moved toward the door of the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center. The RTG is the baseline power supply for... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility is NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft that is scheduled to be launched to Pluto and its moon Charon in January 2006.  Seen here is the Radio Science Experiment (REX) that will measure atmospheric composition and temperature.  The spacecraft is being prepared for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2412

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility is NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft that is scheduled to be launched to Pluto and its moon Charon in January 2006. Se... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Amy Powell, Ennis Shelton and Ed Provost check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after removal of the outside container.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2426

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Amy Powell, Ennis Shelton and Ed Provost check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after removal of the outside containe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney reads a personal dosimeter that will be used by officials handling the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) before its move to the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2418

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney reads a personal dosimeter t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney reads a personal dosimeter that will be used by officials handling the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) before its move to the RTG facility at Kennedy Space ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory are installing blankets that serve as heat shields around the New Horizons spacecraft. Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2406

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians from the Applied Physics Laboratory are installing blankets that serve as heat shields around the N... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts part of the blanket that is being installed as a heat shield around the New Horizons spacecraft.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2407

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts part of the blanket that is being installed as a heat ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dave Nobles oversees the operation as the container is lifted away from the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2425

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dave Nobles oversees the operation as the container is lifted away from the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The RTG is... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is shrouded in insulating blankets that were installed to serve as a heat shield.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2409

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is shrouded in insulating blankets that were installed to serve as a heat shield. ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is moved inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2422

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The container holding the radioisotope t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is moved inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is prepared for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Seen behind the spacecraft is one half of the fairing that will enclose it for launch, scheduled for January 2006.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2410

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazard...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is prepared for a media event. Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is being prepared for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Seen behind the spacecraft is one half of the fairing that will enclose it for launch, scheduled for January 2006.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2413

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the New Horizons spacecraft is being prepared for a media event. Photographers and reporters will be able to photo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Bob Tessmer and Dave Nobles lift the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) container after its move inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2424

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Bob Tessmer and Dave Nobles lift the radi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Bob Tessmer and Dave Nobles lift the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) container after its move inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center. The RTG is the baseline p... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians prepare the New Horizons spacecraft for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Seen behind the spacecraft is one half of the fairing that will enclose it for launch, scheduled for January 2006.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2415

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians prepare the New Horizons spacecraft for a media event. Photographers and reporters will be able to pho... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Bob Tessmer, Dave Nobles and Dan Brunson check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) container after its move inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2423

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Bob Tessmer, Dave Nobles and Dan Brunson...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Bob Tessmer, Dave Nobles and Dan Brunson check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) container after its move inside the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center. The RTG is... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts part of the blanket that it is being installed as a heat shield around the New Horizons spacecraft.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2408

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts part of the blanket that it is being installed as a he... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney makes a zero adjustment of a personal dosimeter for officials handling the  radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) before its move to the RTG facility at Kennedy Space Center.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2417

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney makes a zero adjustment of a...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Jamie Gurney makes a zero adjustment of a personal dosimeter for officials handling the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) before its move to the RTG facility at Kennedy S... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians prepare the New Horizons spacecraft for a media event.  Photographers and reporters will be able to photograph the New Horizons spacecraft and talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Seen behind the spacecraft is one half of the fairing that will enclose it for launch, scheduled for January 2006. Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2411

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazard...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians prepare the New Horizons spacecraft for a media event. Photographers and reporters will be able to phot... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the media (also dressed in clean room suits) learn about NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft (at left) from New Horizons Mission Systems Engineer David Kusnierkiewicz, in the center. Behind Kusnierkiewicz is one half of the fairing that will enclose the spacecraft for launch, scheduled for January 2006. The media event brought photographers and reporters  to the site to talk with project management and test team members from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2416

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazar...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the clean room at KSC’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the media (also dressed in clean room suits) learn about NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft (at left) from New Horizons... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts the blanket that is being installed as a heat shield around the New Horizons spacecraft.  Carrying seven scientific instruments, the compact 1,060-pound New Horizons probe will characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and its moon Charon, map their surface compositions and temperatures, and examine Pluto's complex atmosphere. After that, flybys of Kuiper Belt objects from even farther in the solar system may be undertaken in an extended mission. New Horizons is the first mission in NASA's New Frontiers program of medium-class planetary missions. The spacecraft, designed for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., will fly by Pluto and Charon as early as summer 2015. KSC-05pd2408a

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a technician from the Applied Physics Laboratory adjusts the blanket that is being installed as a heat shield ar... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At Kennedy Space Center, the container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is removed from a truck.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2420

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Kennedy Space Center, the container h...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Kennedy Space Center, the container holding the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is removed from a truck. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Hor... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Rhett Rovig, Mervin Smith, Amy Powell and June Wojciechowski inspect a clamping ring that will be installed on the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2428

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cen...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Rhett Rovig, Mervin Smith, Amy Powell and June Wojciechowski inspect a clamping ring that will be installed on the radioisotope thermoe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson lower a metal canister over the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The canister will protect the RTG when it is moved.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2440

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cente...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson lower a metal canister over the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The canister will protect... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - n the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson move a metal canister toward the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The canister will protect the RTG when it is moved.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2439

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - n the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cente...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - n the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson move a metal canister toward the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The canister will protec... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) rests in a horizontal position.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2432

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) rests in a horizontal position. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson install a clamping ring onto the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  Watching at right is Steve Killian. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2438

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson install a clamping ring onto the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Watching at right is St... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson places a lift attachment onto the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) so it can be lifted off the stand.  Watching at right is Amy Powell.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2429

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson places a lift attachment onto the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) so it can be lifted off the stand. Watching a... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Mervin Smith watches as technicians install a flight adapter on the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2434

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Mervin Smith watches as technicians install a flight adapter on the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The RTG is the baseline... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Steve Killian, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson tilt the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to a horizontal position.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2431

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Steve Killian, Jim Wojciechowski and Dan Brunson tilt the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to a horizontal position. The RTG... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson and Jim Wojciechowski carefully lower the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) into a t-cart.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2435

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson and Jim Wojciechowski carefully lower the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) into a t-cart. The RTG is the baselin... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Tim Hoyle and Mervin Smith check the cable on the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2433

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Tim Hoyle and Mervin Smith check the cable on the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The RTG is the baseline power supply for... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski (left) and Rhett Rovig lift the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) from its stand to place it on a cart.  It will then be maneuvered to a horizontal position.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Jim Wojciechowski (left) and Rhett Rovig lift the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) from its stand to place it on a cart. It ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson and Jim Wojciechowski lower the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) onto a transporter. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2436

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Dan Brunson and Jim Wojciechowski lower the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) onto a transporter. The RTG is the baseline powe... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, officials check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after being lowered onto a transporter. The RTG is the baseline power supply for the NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2437

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Cent...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the RTG Facility at Kennedy Space Center, officials check the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) after being lowered onto a transporter. The RTG is the baseline power su... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) has been installed onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2461

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) has been installed onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit ch... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A transport trailer carrying a solid rocket booster is opened up after arriving at the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.  The booster rocket will be mated, along with others, to the Atlas V already in the VIF.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2443

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A transport trailer carrying a solid roc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A transport trailer carrying a solid rocket booster is opened up after arriving at the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Flo... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is rolled into the building. Inside the facility, it will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2454

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is rolled into the building. Inside the facility, it will be in... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers begin installing the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2459

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers begin installing the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A solid rocket booster, on the right, is lifted up into the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.  The booster rocket will be mated, along with others, to the Atlas V, at left.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2445

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A solid rocket booster, on the right, is...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A solid rocket booster, on the right, is lifted up into the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The booster rocket w... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers install the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2460

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers install the radioisotope thermoelec... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is removed from the transporter.  Inside the facility, it will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2453

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is removed from the transporter. Inside the facility, it will ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  A transport trailer carrying a solid rocket booster arrives at the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.  The booster rocket will be mated, along with others, to the Atlas V already in the VIF.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2442

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A transport trailer carrying a solid roc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A transport trailer carrying a solid rocket booster arrives at the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The booster r... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a crane lifts the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft, in the background, for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2457

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a crane lifts the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will be installed in the New Horizons spacec... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the metal canister is lifted away from the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  Inside the facility, the RTG will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2455

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the metal canister is lifted away from the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Inside the facility, t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the metal canister is secured at left.  In the center is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2456

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload H...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the metal canister is secured at left. In the center is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that w... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida stand by as the solid rocket booster in front of them is prepared to be raised to vertical.  The booster rocket will be mated, along with others, to the Atlas V already in the Vertical Integration Facility, at right.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2444

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Can...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida stand by as the solid rocket booster in front of them is prepared to be raised to vertical. The booster... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) rests horizontally on a moveable stand.  The RTG will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft, at right, for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2458

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) rests horizontally on a moveable stand. The RTG will be install... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a solid rocket booster is being lowered into position on the Atlas V rocket at left.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2446

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vertical Integration Facility on ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a solid rocket booster is being lowered into position on the Atlas V rocke... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  The transporter carrying the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is closed and ready to move to NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility.  It will be installed in the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2452

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The transporter carrying the radioisotop...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The transporter carrying the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is closed and ready to move to NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. It will b... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a solid rocket booster is being lowered into position on the Atlas V rocket at left.  The Atlas V is the launch vehicle for NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon. KSC-05pd2447

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vertical Integration Facility on ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vertical Integration Facility on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a solid rocket booster is being lowered into position on the Atlas V rocke... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) has been installed onto the New Horizons spacecraft for a fit check.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2462

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Ha...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, In NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, engineers move the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) away from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft.  The RTG is being returned to the RTG facility after completing a fit check with the spacecraft.  The RTG is the baseline power supply for the New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2469

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facili...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, engineers move the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) away from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft. The RTG is being returned to t... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a metal canister is lowered over the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG).  The canister will protect the RTG while it is being moved to the RTG facility.  The RTG underwent a fit check with the spacecraft.   The RTG is the baseline power supply for the New Horizons, scheduled to launch in January 2006 on a journey to Pluto and its moon, Charon.  As it approaches Pluto, the spacecraft will look for ultraviolet emission from Pluto's atmosphere and make the best global maps of Pluto and Charon in green, blue, red and a special wavelength that is sensitive to methane frost on the surface. It will also take spectral maps in the near infrared, telling the science team about Pluto's and Charon's surface compositions and locations and temperatures of these materials. When the spacecraft is closest to Pluto or its moon, it will take close-up pictures in both visible and near-infrared wavelengths.  It is expected to reach Pluto in July 2015. KSC-05pd2474

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facil...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a metal canister is lowered over the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The canister will protect the RTG while it is being ... more