The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine
Topic

call up

154 media by topicpage 1 of 2
The doors of three Experimental Test Site (ETS) Observa-Domes are open to allow their individual Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) telescopes to aim skyward to track asteroids traveling through space towards Earth. The ETS is located east of Socorro, New Mexico (NM), in the Northern Call-up Area (FIX) on the White Sands Missile Range, NM, and is operated by the MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Lincoln Laboratory to support the joint US Air Force (USAF) Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) funded Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) Project

The doors of three Experimental Test Site (ETS) Observa-Domes are open...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: White Sands Missile Range State: New Mexico (NM) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released... More

A C-5 air cargo plane opens to reveal a shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-93 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but under review, pending the launch date of a prior mission, STS-99, also under review KSC-99pp1038

A C-5 air cargo plane opens to reveal a shipping container with payloa...

A C-5 air cargo plane opens to reveal a shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servic... More

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) is transferred onto a transporter from the C-5 air cargo plane that brought it to KSC. The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-93 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but under review, pending the launch date of a prior mission, STS-99, also under review KSC-99pp1040

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble...

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) is transferred onto a transporter from the C-5 air cargo plane that brought it to KSC. The hardwa... More

A C-5 air cargo plane lands at Kennedy Space Center carrying the payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-93 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but under review, pending the launch date of a prior mission, STS-99, also under review KSC-99pp1037

A C-5 air cargo plane lands at Kennedy Space Center carrying the paylo...

A C-5 air cargo plane lands at Kennedy Space Center carrying the payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servi... More

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) is ready for transfer onto a transporter from the C-5 air cargo plane that brought it to KSC. The hardware will be taken to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility for final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-93 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but under review, pending the launch date of a prior mission, STS-99, also under review KSC-99pp1039

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble...

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) is ready for transfer onto a transporter from the C-5 air cargo plane that brought it to KSC. The... More

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) sits on a flatbed trailer for transfer to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility where it will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-93 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but under review, pending the launch date of a prior mission, STS-99, also under review KSC-99pp1041

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble...

A shipping container with payload flight hardware for the Third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A) sits on a flatbed trailer for transfer to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility where it will ... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a worker begins to open the protective covering over a part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1048

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a worker begins to...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a worker begins to open the protective covering over a part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The har... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a part of payload flight hardware, intended for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), is revealed after its protective cover has been removed. The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing F...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a part of payload flight hardware, intended for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), is revealed afte... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equipment for mission STS-103 out of its shipping container to move it to a workstand. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1043

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equi...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equipment for mission STS-103 out of its shipping container to move it to a workstand. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardwar... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers remove the protective covering from a part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1049

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers remove the...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers remove the protective covering from a part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware wil... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers check the placement of equipment, part of mission STS-103, onto a workstand. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1044

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers check the ...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), workers check the placement of equipment, part of mission STS-103, onto a workstand. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardware for the third ... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equipment for mission STS-103 out of its shipping container. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A). The hardware will undergo final testing and integration of payload elements in the PHSF. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" mission which is being planned due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Launch of STS-103 is currently targeted for Oct. 14 but the date is under review KSC-99pp1042

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equi...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF), a crane lifts equipment for mission STS-103 out of its shipping container. The equipment is the first part of payload flight hardware for the third Hubble Spa... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, part of the servicing equipment for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), STS-103, is given a black light inspection. The hardware is undergoing final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1079

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, part of the servicing equ...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, part of the servicing equipment for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), STS-103, is given a black light inspection. The hardware is undergoin... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker gives a black light inspection to part of the servicing equipment for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), STS-103. The hardware is undergoing final testing and integration of payload elements. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the Hubble's pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1078

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker gives a black li...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a worker gives a black light inspection to part of the servicing equipment for the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission (SM-3A), STS-103. The hardware is u... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew check out the top of the Flight Support System (FSS) for the mission, the repair and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope. The number one in the foreground refers to one of the berthing latches on the FSS. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1095

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servic...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew check out the top of the Flight Support System (FSS) for the mission, the repair and upgrade of th... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, members of the STS-103 crew check out new Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) for the Hubble Space Telescope. The payload hardware is in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. From left are Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). Other members of the crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with the MLI. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1093

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, members of the STS-103 crew ch...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, members of the STS-103 crew check out new Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) for the Hubble Space Telescope. The payload hardware is in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) and Pilot Scott J. Kelly look at a replacement computer for the Hubble Space Telescope. The payload hardware is in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. Other members of the crew are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with the new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1092

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Br...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (left) and Pilot Scott J. Kelly look at a replacement computer for the Hubble Space Telescope. The payload hardware is in the Payloa... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a member of the STS-103 crew checks out rib clamp to be used on the Shield Shell Replacement Fabric (SSRF) task on repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1090

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a member of the STS-103 c...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, a member of the STS-103 crew checks out rib clamp to be used on the Shield Shell Replacement Fabric (SSRF) task on repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-me... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith (right) and other members of the crew look over new Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) intended for the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with the MLI. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1091

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialis...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith (right) and other members of the crew look over new Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) intended for the Hubble Space Telescope. ... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew look at some of the equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1089

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 cr...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew look at some of the equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Ke... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew get instructions on use of rib clamps for the Shield Shell Replacement Fabric (SSRF) task on repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1088

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 cr...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew get instructions on use of rib clamps for the Shield Shell Replacement Fabric (SSRF) task on repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. The se... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, some of the STS-103 crew look over lubrication devices to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1087

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, some of the STS-103 crew ...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, some of the STS-103 crew look over lubrication devices to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the STS-103 crew look over equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1086

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the STS-103 crew look ove...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the STS-103 crew look over equipment to be used during their mission. The seven-member crew, taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, are Commander Curtis L. ... More

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, four STS-103 crew members check the Flight Support System avionics to be used for repair and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope. The crew are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1096

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, four STS-103 crew members...

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, four STS-103 crew members check the Flight Support System avionics to be used for repair and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope. The crew are at KSC to take part ... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 crew check out a portable foot restraint on the Flight Support System that will be used on the mission, repairing the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1098

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 ...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 crew check out a portable foot restraint on the Flight Support System that will be used on the mission, repairing the Hubble Space Telescope... More

Standing on a workstand in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and John M. Grunsfield (Ph.D.) pose for the camera while standing in front of the base of the Flight Support System, to be used for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope, the primary mission on STS-103. The crew are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. Other members of the crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1097

Standing on a workstand in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, S...

Standing on a workstand in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, STS-103 Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and John M. Grunsfield (Ph.D.) pose for the camera while standing in front of the base of the Fli... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew check out the Flight Support System (FSS)from above and below. The FSS is part of the primary payload on the mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1094

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servic...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, members of the STS-103 crew check out the Flight Support System (FSS)from above and below. The FSS is part of the primary payl... More

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 crew check out tools to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. In uniform, from left, are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.). Other crew members at KSC for the CEIT are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1099

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 ...

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 crew check out tools to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. In unif... More

In the payload bay of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), left, and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, right, are briefed on part of the equipment they will use on their mission by a worker from Johnson Space Center, center. The mission involves the repair and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope. The crew, who are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, also includes Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1124

In the payload bay of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 Mission Specialis...

In the payload bay of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), left, and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, right, are briefed on part of the equipment they will use on their ... More

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. sits in the command seat of the orbiter Discovery, inspecting the window. Brown and other crew members are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The rest of the crew are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1100

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Commander Curt...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. sits in the command seat of the orbiter Discovery, inspecting the window. Brown and other crew members are at KSC to take pa... More

In the mid-deck of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 crew Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Pilot Scott J. Kelly check out part of the equipment to be flown on the mission, the repair and upgrade of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are at KSC taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test along with other crew members Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1125

In the mid-deck of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 crew Commander Curti...

In the mid-deck of the orbiter Discovery, STS-103 crew Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Pilot Scott J. Kelly check out part of the equipment to be flown on the mission, the repair and upgrade of the Hubble Spa... More

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly sits in the pilot's seat of the orbiter Discovery, inspecting the window. The mission will be Kelly's first Space Shuttle flight. Kelly and other crew members are at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The rest of the crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1101

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Pilot Scott J....

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly sits in the pilot's seat of the orbiter Discovery, inspecting the window. The mission will be Kelly's first Space Shuttle flight. Kel... More

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members look over equipment to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC. From left are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Steven L. Smith. Other crew members at KSC for the CEIT are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1103

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members l...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members look over equipment to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are ... More

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members check out equipment to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are taking part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) at KSC. From left are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Steven L. Smith. Other crew members at KSC for the CEIT are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1102

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members c...

In the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, STS-103 crew members check out equipment to be used on planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) on the mission for repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. They are ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery sits inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) after its rollover from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1. In the VAB, Discovery will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1281

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery sits inside the Ve...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery sits inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) after its rollover from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1. In the VAB, Discovery will be mated with ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99padig024

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins rolling into th...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1279

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the to...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins its rollover to the Vehicle Assembly Building (in the background) after leaving the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. Launch date for Discovery on mission STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is under review for early December. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99padig020

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins its rollover to...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery begins its rollover to the Vehicle Assembly Building (in the background) after leaving the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. Launch date for Discovery on mission... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After making a turn in front of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, the orbiter Discovery begins moving along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building as KSC workers watch. At the VAB, Discovery will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1278

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After making a turn in front of the Orbi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After making a turn in front of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1, the orbiter Discovery begins moving along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building as KSC workers w... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 (at left) to the Vehicle Assembly Building for mating with an external tank and solid rocket boosters. Launch date for Discovery on mission STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is under review for early December. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99padig021

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is moved from the Orbi...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1 (at left) to the Vehicle Assembly Building for mating with an external tank and solid rocket boosters. Launch ... More

In this aerial view, the orbiter Discovery is out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1 and rolling back before onto the tow-way for its rollover to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters before its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1277

In this aerial view, the orbiter Discovery is out of the Orbiter Proce...

In this aerial view, the orbiter Discovery is out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1 and rolling back before onto the tow-way for its rollover to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this aerial view, the tail of the orbiter Discovery can be seen as it begins rolling out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1 (center left of photo). Behind it is the tow-way, which leads from the Shuttle Landing Facility past the OPF. In the foreground is the new road under construction as part of the Safe Haven project. And at right is the one of two crawlers used to move the Shuttles to the launch pad. Discovery is moving to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking with an external tank and solid rocket boosters before its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1276

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this aerial view, the tail of the orb...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In this aerial view, the tail of the orbiter Discovery can be seen as it begins rolling out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1 (center left of photo). Behind it is the ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1280

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the to...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery rolls along the tow-way to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is rolled over to the Vehicle Assembly Building from the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. In the VAB it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boosters for its launch on mission STS-103. The launch date is currently under review for early December. STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99padig023

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is rolled over to the ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Orbiter Discovery is rolled over to the Vehicle Assembly Building from the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1. In the VAB it will be mated with an external tank and solid rocket boo... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister for Space Shuttle Discovery, for mission STS-103, is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure. The hoses attached to the canister provide airconditioning until the canister is mated to the environmentally controlled Payload Changeout Room and the payload bay doors are open. Installation of the payload into Discovery is slated for Friday, Nov. 12. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1288

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister for Space Shuttle Discovery, for mission STS-103, is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure. The hoses attached to the canister provide ai... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the open doors of the payload canister, inside the environmentally controlled Payload Changeout Room, reveal the Hubble Servicing Mission cargo. At the top is the Orbital Replacement Unit Carrier and at the bottom is the Flight Support System. Installation of the payload into Discovery is slated for Friday, Nov. 12. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1289

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the open doors of the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the open doors of the payload canister, inside the environmentally controlled Payload Changeout Room, reveal the Hubble Servicing Mission cargo. At the top is th... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister for Space Shuttle Discovery, for mission STS-103, is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure. Installation of the payload into Discovery is slated for Friday, Nov. 12. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode KSC-99pp1287

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At Launch Pad 39B, the payload canister for Space Shuttle Discovery, for mission STS-103, is lifted up the Rotating Service Structure. Installation of the payload into Discovery i... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery clears the Vehicle Assembly Building (left) on its crawl to Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency KSC-99pp1302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery clears the Vehic...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery clears the Vehicle Assembly Building (left) on its crawl to Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the o... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery, atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, nears the top of Launch Pad 39B after the trekfrom the Vehicle Assembly Building. At left are the Rotating Service Structure and the Fixed Service Structure, which will enable final preparations of the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency KSC-99pp1305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery, atop the mobile...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery, atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, nears the top of Launch Pad 39B after the trekfrom the Vehicle Assembly Building. At left are th... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B which is 4.2 miles (6.8 kilometers) away. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. Comprising the STS-103 crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, with the European Space Agency KSC-99padig031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B which is 4.2 mil... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Pad 39B. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. Comprising the STS-103 crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, with the European Space Agency. KSC-99padig032

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the American flag flapping in the morning breeze, Space Shuttle Discovery, across the turn basin, makes its crawl to Launch Pad 39B (background, left) atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. KSC-99pp1303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the American flag flapping in the m...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- With the American flag flapping in the morning breeze, Space Shuttle Discovery, across the turn basin, makes its crawl to Launch Pad 39B (background, left) atop the mobile launcher... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency KSC-99padig035

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher p... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Discovery towers against the hazy blue sky after a seven-hour trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1308

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Discove...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39B, Space Shuttle Discovery towers against the hazy blue sky after a seven-hour trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The orbiter, external tank and solid rocket ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery makes the turn toward Launch Pad 39B on its trek atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. KSC-99pp1304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery makes the turn t...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery makes the turn toward Launch Pad 39B on its trek atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery approaches Launch Pad 39B where the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST. KSC-99pp1307

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery approaches Launc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery approaches Launch Pad 39B where the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch. The mission is ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery negotiates a turn in the crawlerway on its trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39B. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency KSC-99padig036

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery negotiates a turn in the crawlerway on its trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building to La... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B which is 4.2 miles (6.8 kilometers) away. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. Comprising the STS-103 crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, with the European Space Agency KSC-99padig030

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B which is 4.2 mil... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. --  Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Once at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. KSC-99padig033

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Under low clouds and fog, Space Shuttle Discovery makes its trek along the stretch of crawlerway between the Vehicle Assembly Building and Launch Pad 39B atop the mobile launcher ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery arrives at Launch Pad 39B where the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, both with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. KSC-99pp1306

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery arrives at Launc...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Discovery arrives at Launch Pad 39B where the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch. The mission is ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B. While at the pad, the orbiter, external tank and solid rocket boosters will undergo final preparations for the STS-103 launch targeted for Dec. 6, 1999, at 2:37 a.m. EST. The mission is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system the gyros which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will also be installing a Fine Guidance Sensor, a new enhanced computer, a solid-state digital recorder, and a new spare transmitter to replace older equipment, and replacing degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. Comprising the STS-103 crew are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, with the European Space Agency KSC-99padig034

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platfo...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Towering atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter, Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its way to Launch Pad 39B. While at the pa... More

STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behind him (left) is Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. At right is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who also is with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1314

STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly is ready to take his turn at driving a sm...

STS-103 Pilot Scott J. Kelly is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Behi... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith , John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1313

STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) is ready to take h...

STS-103 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) is ready to take his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test ... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency, takes his turn at the helm of a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Jean-François Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1309

STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is wit...

STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is with the European Space Agency, takes his turn at the helm of a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training durin... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency, gets ready for his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who also is with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1315

STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is wit...

STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency, gets ready for his turn at driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training ... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith gets ready to practice driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1312

STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith gets ready to practice driv...

STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith gets ready to practice driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activiti... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) gets ready to take the wheel of a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1310

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) gets ready to tak...

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) gets ready to take the wheel of a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCD... More

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At far left is Mission Specialist Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1311

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) pract...

STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT)... More