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Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions.  Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur.  Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.  At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands.  (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-A79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Eu...

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... More

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) above Jupiter's clouds. Although both satellites have about the same brightness, Io's color is very different from Europa's. Io's equatorial region show two types of material -- dark orange, broken by several bright spots -- producing a mottled appearance. The poles are darker and reddish. Preliminary evidence suggests color variations within and between the polar regions.  Io's surface composition is unknown, but scientists believe it may be a mixture of salts and sulfur.  Erupoa is less strongly colored, although still relatively dark at short wavelengths. Markings on Eruopa are less evident that on the other satellites, although this picture shows darker regions toward the trailing half of the visible disk. Jupiter at this point is about 20 million kilometers (12.4 million miles) from the spacecraft.  At this resolution (about 400 kimometers or 250 miles) there is evidence of circular motion in Jupiter's atmosphere. While the dominant large-scale motions are west-to-east, small-scale movement includes eddy-like circulation within and between the bands.  (JPL ref: P-21082) ARC-1979-AC79-0164-1

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Eu...

Voyager 1 Image of Jupiter and two of its satellites (Io, left, and Europa). Io is about 350,000 kilometers (220,000 miles) above Jupiter's Great Red Spot; Europa is about 600,000 kilometers (375,000 miles) abo... More

Range :  6 million kilometers (3.7 million miles) Central Longitude 120 degrees west, North is up. and 3rd from the planet.  Photo taken after midnight  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7019

Range : 6 million kilometers (3.7 million miles) Central Longitude 12...

Range : 6 million kilometers (3.7 million miles) Central Longitude 120 degrees west, North is up. and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less de... More

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's outermost Galilean satellites and darkest of  the four(but almost twice as bright as Earth's Moon).  Mottled appearance from bright and dark patches.  Bright spots seem like rayed or bright halved craters seen on our Moon.  This face is always turned toward Jupiter.  Photo taken through violet filter.  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7020

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's o...

Range : 7 million kilometers (5 million miles) Callisto is Jupiter's outermost Galilean satellites and darkest of the four(but almost twice as bright as Earth's Moon). Mottled appearance from bright and dark ... More

Range :  4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet.  Photo taken after midnight  Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less dense (twice the density of water).  Its surface brightness is 4 times of Earth's Moon.  Mare regions (dark features) are like the Moon's but have twice the brightness, and believed to be unlikely of rock or lava as the Moon's are.  It's north pole seems covered with brighter material and may be water frost.  Scattered brighter spots may be related to impact craters or source of fresh ice. ARC-1979-A79-7016

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupite...

Range : 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) Ganymede is Jupiter's Largest Galilean satellites and 3rd from the planet. Photo taken after midnight Ganymede is slightly larger than Mercury but much less... More

P-21744 C Range: 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) In this image of Europa acquired by Voyager 2, global scale dark streaks are becoming visible. Europa, the size of the earth's moon, is apparently covered by water ice as indicated by ground based spectrometers and its brightness. The central longitude of this view is 235° west. Bright rayed impact craters which are abundant on ancient Ganymede and Callisto would easily be visible at this range. The suggestion is that Europa's surface is young and that the streaks are reflections of currently active internal dynamic processes. ARC-1979-AC79-7078

P-21744 C Range: 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) In this im...

P-21744 C Range: 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) In this image of Europa acquired by Voyager 2, global scale dark streaks are becoming visible. Europa, the size of the earth's moon, is apparently cov... More

Range :  4.2 million km. ( 2.6 million miles ) Jupiter's moon Europa, the size of earth's moon, is apparently covered by water ice, as indicated by ground spectrometers and its brightness. In this view, global scale dark sreaks discovered by Voyager 1 that criss-cross the the satelite are becoming visible. Bright rayed impact craters, which are abundant on Ganymede and Callisto, would be easily visible at this range, suggesting that Europa's surface is young and that the streaks are reflections of currently active internal dynamic processes. ARC-1979-A79-7103

Range : 4.2 million km. ( 2.6 million miles ) Jupiter's moon Europa, ...

Range : 4.2 million km. ( 2.6 million miles ) Jupiter's moon Europa, the size of earth's moon, is apparently covered by water ice, as indicated by ground spectrometers and its brightness. In this view, global ... More

P-21757 BW Range: 2 million kilometers (1.25 million miles) Jupiter's thin ring of particles was photographed by Voyager 2 on its approach to the giant planet. The spacecraft was 2.5° above the plane of the ring. Segments of both sides of the faint ring were captured in this picture. The ring was first photographed in an edge-on configuration by Voyager 1 and was measured then to have a radial extent of about 55, 000 kilometers (34,000 miles) from Jupiter's cloud tops. With this picture, it is possible to determine that the ring is much narrower radially than the individual rings of Saturn. This image has had an extreme contrast enhancement process applied to it which brought out some white blotches in the central region and makes the ring appear discontinuous and non-uniform in brightness. These effects are all artifacts of the processing. ARC-1979-A79-7086

P-21757 BW Range: 2 million kilometers (1.25 million miles) Jupiter's ...

P-21757 BW Range: 2 million kilometers (1.25 million miles) Jupiter's thin ring of particles was photographed by Voyager 2 on its approach to the giant planet. The spacecraft was 2.5° above the plane of the ri... More

Range :  4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 has discovered  two 'shepard' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons, designated 1986U7 and 1986U8, are seen here on either side of the bright Epsilon Ring. All nine of the known Uranian rings are visible here. The image was proccessed to enhance narrow features. The Epsilon Ring appears surrounded by a dark halo as a result of this proccessing. Occasional blips seen on the ring are also artifacts. Lying inward from the Epsilon Ring are the Delta, Gamma, and Eta Rings; then the Beta abd Alpha Rings; and finally, the barely visible 4, 5, and 6 Rings. The rings have been studied since their discovery in 1977, through observations of how they diminish the light of stars they pass in front of. This image is the first direct observationn of all nine rings in reflected sunlight. They range in width from about 100 km. (60 mi.) at the widest part of the Epsilon Ring to only a few kilometers  for most of the others. The discovery of the two ring moons 1986U7 and 1986U8 is a major advance in our understanding of the structure of the Uranian rings and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions of how these narrow rings are kept from spreading out. Based on likely surface brightness properties, the moons are of roughly 20 and 30 km. diameter, respectively. ARC-1981-A86-7006

Range : 4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 ha...

Range : 4.1 million km. ( 2.5 million miles ) P-29466B/W Voyager 2 has discovered two 'shepard' satellites associated with the rings of Uranus. The two moons, designated 1986U7 and 1986U8, are seen here on ei... More

Range:  72.3 million km. ( 44.9 million miles ) P-29314B/W This Voyager 2 photograph of Uranus shows the planets outermost, or epsilon, ring.  This is a computerized summation of six images shot by the narrow angle camera. It is the first photo to show the epsilon ring unblurred by Earth's atmosphere. The Epsilon ring, some 51,200 km. ( 31,800 miles )  from the planets center, is the most prominent of Uranus' nine known rings. Ground based observations of stellar occulations by the rings have determined that the Epsilon ring is eccentric, or elliptical, with its widest portion  about 100 km. ( 60 miles ) wide and its narrowest portion about 20 km. (12 miles ). Estimates of the rings brightness suggest that it is also very dark, with a reflectance of only 1 or 2  percent and a probable  composition of carbonaceous material similiar to that on dark asteroids and the dark side of Saturn's moon Lapetus. Because the ring is so narrow and dark, at this range,  the Voyager camera could not  resolve even the widest part,  resulting in long exposure times so obtain a good image. six exposures of 11 or 15 second duration were added together by computer to produce this image.  In this image, the central  portion is greatly overexposed. Various artifacts due to electronic effects  and image proccessing can be seen in the central portion of the frame, including the dark image just above the planets image, the diffuse brightening below it and the small, bright projection from the edge of the planet in the upper left. The ring is distinctly less prominent in the lower left portion and more prominent in the upper right. This is in agreement with the predicted locations of the narrow and wide portions of the ring, respectively. ARC-1985-A86-7001

Range: 72.3 million km. ( 44.9 million miles ) P-29314B/W This Voyage...

Range: 72.3 million km. ( 44.9 million miles ) P-29314B/W This Voyager 2 photograph of Uranus shows the planets outermost, or epsilon, ring. This is a computerized summation of six images shot by the narrow a... More

Range :  36 million km. ( 22 million miles ) P-29426B/W This Voyager 2 photograph of Uranus shows the is the  first picture to show clear evidence of latitudinal banding in the planet's atmosphere.  This is a computerized summation of five images shot by the narrow angle camera. The concentric pattern emanates like a bulls-eye from the planets pole of rotation, which, in this view, lies left of center. uranus lies almost on its side with respect to the other planets  and is rotating in a counter clockwise direction, as seen here. Clouds in the Uranian atmosphere give rise to the pattern, the first clear evidence of banding similiar to that seen previosly on Saturn and Jupiter. The bandind on Uranus, however, shows much less contrast. At the distance at which the images were acquired, Voyager's camera could have detected individual features as small as 660 km. (410 miles) across, but no such cloud or markings  were apparent. Scientists cannot yet say what properties, such as cloud height, composition, or particle size, are giving rise to the varying levels of brightness visible here. The images composing this picture  were shot through a filter that transmits only violet light. in the original, unprocessed images, the contrast of features  producing the banding is low, not more than 10 percent. In order to reduce 'noise' and enhance the visiblity of the features, processors  combined five images  and then compared the resulting  composite to a hypothetical featureless planet illuminated  by the Sun from  the proper direction. Only the ratio between the original data and the hypothetical image is shown. ARC-1985-A86-7002

Range : 36 million km. ( 22 million miles ) P-29426B/W This Voyager 2...

Range : 36 million km. ( 22 million miles ) P-29426B/W This Voyager 2 photograph of Uranus shows the is the first picture to show clear evidence of latitudinal banding in the planet's atmosphere. This is a c... More

P-29522BW Range: 369,000 kilometers (229,000 miles) This is the highest-resolution picture of Titania returned by Voyager 2. The picture is a composite of two images taken through the clear-filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera. The resolution of this image is 13 km (8 mi). Titania is the largest satellite of Uranus, with a diameter of little more than 1,600 km (1,000 mi). Abundant impact craters of many sizes pockmark the ancient surface. The most prominant features are fault valleys that stretch across Titania. They are up to 1,500 km (nearly 1,000 mi) long and as much as 75 km (45 mi) wide. In valleys seen at right center, the sunward-facing walls are very bright. While this is due partly to the lighting angle, the brightness also indicates the presence of a lighter material, possibly young frost deposits. An impact crater more than 200 km (125 mi) in diameter distinguishes the very bottom of the disk; the crater is cut by a younger fault valley more than 100 km (60 mi) wide. An even larger impact crater, perhaps 300 km (180 mi) across, is visible at top. ARC-1986-A86-7038

P-29522BW Range: 369,000 kilometers (229,000 miles) This is the highes...

P-29522BW Range: 369,000 kilometers (229,000 miles) This is the highest-resolution picture of Titania returned by Voyager 2. The picture is a composite of two images taken through the clear-filter of Voyager's ... More

P-29502C Range: 1.04 million kilometers (650,000 miles) This color photo of Umbriel, the darkest of Uranus' five large moons was synthesized from frames exposed with the Voyager narrow-angle camera's violet and clear filters and has a resolution of 19 km (12 mi.). Umbriel is characterized by the darkest surface and smallest brightness variations of any of the large satellites of Uranus. As seen here, the surface is also generally gray and colorless. Nevertheless, at this resolution, considerable topographic detail is revealed, showing that Umbriel's surface is covered by impact craters. The brightest spot (shown at top near the equator at approxiamately 270 ° longitude) appears as a bright ring. Its geological significance is not yet understood. Umbriel has a diameter of about 1,200 km (750 miles) and orbits 267,000 km (166,000 mi) from Uranus' center. The satellite's name, from Alexander Pope's 'Rape of the Lock,' means 'dark angel'. ARC-1986-AC86-7018

P-29502C Range: 1.04 million kilometers (650,000 miles) This color pho...

P-29502C Range: 1.04 million kilometers (650,000 miles) This color photo of Umbriel, the darkest of Uranus' five large moons was synthesized from frames exposed with the Voyager narrow-angle camera's violet and... More

Range :  12 million km (7.5 million miles) Resolution 110 km (68 miles) per pixel. These 2 images of Neptune were taken by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera.  During the 17.6 hours between the left and right images, the Great Dark Spot, at 22 degrees south latitude (left of center), has completed a little less than one rotation of Neptune.  The smaller dark spot, at 54 south, completed a little more than one rotation, as can be seen by comparing its relative positions in the two pictures.  The Great Dark Spot and the smaller spot have a relative velocity of 100 meters per second (220 miles an hour).  The light and dark bands circling Neptune indicate predominantly zonal (east-west) motion.  The diffuse white feature north of the Great Dark Spot is near Neptune's equator, and rotates with about the same period as the Great Dark Spot.  Streak of bright clouds at the south edge, and just east of the Great Dark Spot, are its constatnt companions, and change the details of their appearance, often within a few hours.  Changing brightness of the cloud streaks could be a result of vertical mortions. ARC-1989-A89-7006

Range : 12 million km (7.5 million miles) Resolution 110 km (68 miles...

Range : 12 million km (7.5 million miles) Resolution 110 km (68 miles) per pixel. These 2 images of Neptune were taken by Voyager 2's narrow-angle camera. During the 17.6 hours between the left and right imag... More

Range :  4.7 million km (2.9 million mi.) Nereid, the last satellite of Neptune to be discovered before Voyager's recent discoveries, was first seen by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.  Until this Voyager 2 image was obtained, all that was known about Nereid was its orbital parameters and intrinsic brightness.  With a resolution of 43 kilometers (26.6 mi.) per  pixel, this image has sufficient detail to show the overall size and albedo.  Nereid is about 170 km (105 mi.) across and reflects about 12 percent of the incident light. ARC-1989-A89-7033

Range : 4.7 million km (2.9 million mi.) Nereid, the last satellite o...

Range : 4.7 million km (2.9 million mi.) Nereid, the last satellite of Neptune to be discovered before Voyager's recent discoveries, was first seen by Gerard Kuiper in 1949. Until this Voyager 2 image was obt... More

P-34707 Range: 720,000 kilometers (446,400 miles) The Voyager spacecraft took this picture after closest approach to Neptune using the clear filter of the wide-angle camera with an exposure time of 255 seconds. The view back towards Neptune at a phase angle of 135° found the two known rings to be five to ten times brighter than seen in backscattering during Voyager approach at a much lower phase angle. This brightness increase implies a large percentage of microscopic particles within the rings. Although the dominant arc-like clump of the outer ring is not seen here, the inner ring appears brighter than the outer ring at the longitudes seen in this image. A faint sheet of material is also revealed that extends from the faint ring at a radius of 53,200 kilometers (33,000 miles). A new and even fainter ring was also discovered in this image at about 41,000 kilometers (25,400 miles), seen running from the lower left corner to about one-third the way across the top of the frame. This ring is quite broad, about 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) in radial width. In contrast to the two previously discovered rings, this feature is quite diffuse and has no well defined radial boundaries. ARC-1989-A89-7037

P-34707 Range: 720,000 kilometers (446,400 miles) The Voyager spacecra...

P-34707 Range: 720,000 kilometers (446,400 miles) The Voyager spacecraft took this picture after closest approach to Neptune using the clear filter of the wide-angle camera with an exposure time of 255 seconds.... More

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas. Thus, regions that appear white or bright red are those that reflect sunlight before it passes through a large quantity of methane. The image reveals the presence of a ubiquitous haze that covers Neptune in a semitransparent layer. Near the center of the disk, sunlight passes through the haze and deeper into the atmosphere, where some wavelenghths are absorbed by methane gas, causing the center to appear less red. Near the edge of the planet, the haze scatters sunlight at a higher altitude, above most of the methane, causing the bright red edge around the planet. By measuring haze brightness at several wavelengths, scientists are able to estimate the thickness of the haze and its ability to scatter sunlight. The image is among the last of the full-disk photos that Voyager 2 took before beginning its endless journey into interstellar space. ARC-1989-AC89-7036

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2...

P-34705 This false-color photograph of Neptune was made from Voyager 2 images taken through three filters: blue, green, and a filter that passes light at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane gas. Thus, regi... More

Range :  1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Venus was taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shortly befor 10pm PST when the space craft was directly above Venus' equator.  This is the 66th of more than 80 Venus images Galileo was programmed to take and record during its Venus flyby.  In the picture, cloud features as small as 25 miles (40 km) can be seen.  Patches of waves and convective clouds are superimpposed on the swirl of the planet's broad weather patterns, marked by the dark chevron at the center.  North is at the top.  The several ring-shaped shadows are blemishes, not planetary features.  The spacecraft imaging system has a 1500-mm, f/8.5 reflecting telescope; the exposure time was 1/40 second.  The image was taken through the violet filter (0.41 micron.).  It was produced by the imaging system in digital form, as a set of numbers representing the brightness perceived in each of the 640,000 picture elements defined on the solid-state plate, called a charged-coupled-device or CCD, on which the image was focused. ARC-1990-A91-2000

Range : 1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Ve...

Range : 1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Venus was taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shortly befor 10pm PST when the space craft was directly above Venus' equator. This is the 66th ... More

Range :  4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than  the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the  wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade. ARC-1990-AC79-7127

Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-...

Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vant... More

This three-dimensional representation of brightness variations in a Magellan radar image of Golubkina crater enhances the structural features of the crater.  Golubkina is 34 kimometers (20.4 mi.) in diameter, and is located at about 60.5 degrees north latitude, 287.2 degrees east longitude.  Golubkina is characterized by  terraced inner walls and a central peak, typical of large impact craters on the Earth, Moon and Mars.  The terraced inner walls form at late stages in the formation of an impact crater, due to collapse of the initial cavity formed by the meterorite impact.  The central peak forms due to rebound of the inner crater floor. ARC-1990-A90-3005

This three-dimensional representation of brightness variations in a Ma...

This three-dimensional representation of brightness variations in a Magellan radar image of Golubkina crater enhances the structural features of the crater. Golubkina is 34 kimometers (20.4 mi.) in diameter, a... More

GREENBELT, Md. -- At NASA’s Goddard space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., a fully integrated Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer EUVE is seen in a clean room. EUVE will map the entire sky to determine the existence, direction, brightness and temperature of numerous objects that are sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation.  Goddard is responsible for the design, construction, integration, checkout and operation of the spacecraft which is scheduled to launch May 28, 1992 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., aboard a Delta II rocket. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-92PC-0371

GREENBELT, Md. -- At NASA’s Goddard space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md...

GREENBELT, Md. -- At NASA’s Goddard space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., a fully integrated Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer EUVE is seen in a clean room. EUVE will map the entire sky to determine the existence, di... More

Visible Jovian Aurora - NASA/JPL Galileo Program Images

Visible Jovian Aurora - NASA/JPL Galileo Program Images

Jupiter's aurora on the night side of the planet is seen here at five different wavelengths. Jupiter's bright crescent, which is about half illuminated, is out of view to the right. North is at the top. The ima... More

Jupiter Ring Halo - NASA/JPL Galileo Program Images

Jupiter Ring Halo - NASA/JPL Galileo Program Images

A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilomete... More

Anaglyph: Shaded Relief and Height as Brightness, Iturralde Structure, Bolivia

Anaglyph: Shaded Relief and Height as Brightness, Iturralde Structure,...

This anaglyph, from NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, is of the Iturralde Structure, Bolivia, a possible impact crater. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image. NASA/JPL

Global Average Brightness Temperature for April 2003

Global Average Brightness Temperature for April 2003

This image shows average temperatures in April, 2003, observed by AIRS at an infrared wavelength that senses either the Earth's surface or any intervening cloud. Similar to a photograph of the planet taken with... More

Gotel Mountains, Nigeria and Cameroon, SRTM Shaded Relief plus Height as   Brightness

Gotel Mountains, Nigeria and Cameroon, SRTM Shaded Relief plus Height ...

River drainage patterns provide clues to the rock types and erosional processes involved in landscape evolution. NASA/JPL/NIMA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --   Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1123

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduc...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey o... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --  Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1126

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey ou... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --    Lights are reflected on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft during illumination testing.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1124

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lights are reflected on the solar array pan...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Lights are reflected on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft during illumination testing. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --   Ball Aerospace and Technology workers adjust the light cast on solar array panels during illumination testing of NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1128

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers adjust...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers adjust the light cast on solar array panels during illumination testing of NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specific... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --   Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1129

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduc...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey o... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --    Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1125

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers condu...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Ball Aerospace and Technology workers conduct a light test on the solar array panels of NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --  A Ball Aerospace and Technology worker conducts a light sensor test on NASA's Kepler spacecraft.  A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy have such planets. Kepler will hunt for planets using a specialized one-meter diameter telescope called a photometer to measure the small changes in brightness caused by the transits.  Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy. After processing at Astrotech, Kepler will be carried to its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 5 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket.  Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1127

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Ball Aerospace and Technology worker conduc...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Ball Aerospace and Technology worker conducts a light sensor test on NASA's Kepler spacecraft. A NASA Discovery mission, Kepler is specifically designed to survey our region of the M... More

Saturn Rings, Brightness Bucks the Dark, NASA image

Saturn Rings, Brightness Bucks the Dark, NASA image

Dramatic differences between dark and light embellish image of Saturn, its rings and its moons Dione and Enceladus in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Cornelia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Cornelia Crater

These images taken by NASA Dawn framing camera are located in asteroids Vesta Numisia quadrangle. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Severina Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Severina Crater

These images are located in Vesta Rheasilvia quadrangle, near asteroid Vesta south pole. NASA Dawn spacecraft obtained the apparent brightness image with its framing camera on Oct. 22, 2011. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UC... More

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Tarpeia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Tarpeia Crater

These images are located in asteroid Vesta Rheasilvia quadrangle, near Vesta south pole. These images are centered on the large Tarpeia crater. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Helena Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Helena Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in Vesta Sextilia quadrangle, in asteroid Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Antonia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Antonia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Tuccia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Canuleia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Canuleia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Urbinia quadrangle, in asteroid Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Canuleia and Sossia Craters

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Canuleia and Sossia Crate...

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Urbinia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Drusilla Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Drusilla Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Numisia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Eusebia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Eusebia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Tuccia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Fabia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Fabia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Numisia quadrangle, in Vesta northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Justina Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Justina Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Urbinia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Laelia and Sextilia Craters

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Laelia and Sextilia Crate...

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Sextilia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Helena and Laelia Craters

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Helena and Laelia Craters

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Sextilia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Scantia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Scantia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Numisia quadrangle, a few degrees below Vesta equator. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Sossia and Canuleia Craters

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Sossia and Canuleia Crate...

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Urbinia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. Rays of bright material surround Canuleia crater and rays of dark material extend from the ... More

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Urbinia and Sossia Craters

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Urbinia and Sossia Crater...

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Urbinia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. Urbinia crater is the large, irregularly shaped crater, Sossia the middle-sized crater. NAS... More

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Octavia Crater

Apparent Brightness and Topography Images of Octavia Crater

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Marcia quadrangle, just south of Vesta equator. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Rubria Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

Rubria Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Gegania quadrangle, just south of Vesta equator. Rubria is the crater with dark and bright material above Divalia Fossa and Occia is the crat... More

Occia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

Occia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

These apparent brightness and topography images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Gegania quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Serena Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

Serena Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

These apparent brightness and topography images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Sextilia quadrangle, in Vesta southern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Arruntia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Image

Arruntia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Image

These apparent brightness and topography images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in asteroid Vesta Bellicia quadrangle, in Vesta northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Fabia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

Fabia Crater, Apparent Brightness and Topography Images

These images from NASA Dawn spacecraft are located in Vesta Numisia quadrangle, in Vesta northern hemisphere. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

A Sailor checks a filtered sample of jet propellant (JP) 5 fuel for brightness and clarity.

A Sailor checks a filtered sample of jet propellant (JP) 5 fuel for br...

GULF OF THAILAND (Feb. 10, 2013) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fuel) 3rd Class Shannon Slotwinski, assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), checks a filtered sample of... More

HISET/ HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST (SOLAR ENVIRONMENT SYSTEM WITH LAMPS THAT REPLICATE THE SUN’S BRIGHTNESS AND RANGE, COMBINED WITH A PROTON ACCELERATOR 1300912

HISET/ HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST (SOLAR ENVIRONMENT SYSTEM...

HISET/ HIGH INTENSITY SOLAR ENVIRONMENT TEST (SOLAR ENVIRONMENT SYSTEM WITH LAMPS THAT REPLICATE THE SUN’S BRIGHTNESS AND RANGE, COMBINED WITH A PROTON ACCELERATOR

Enceladus Plume Brightness Variations - NASA Cassini Huygens images

Enceladus Plume Brightness Variations - NASA Cassini Huygens images

This plot shows the variation in brightness of the plume of material, composed of all the geysers erupting from the south polar terrain of Saturn moon Enceladus, as a function of the moon orbital position aroun... More

Brightness Rhythm of Mars Flyby Comet Is Clue to Rotation Rate

Brightness Rhythm of Mars Flyby Comet Is Clue to Rotation Rate

This graph shows changes in apparent brightness of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as it approached and receded from Mars, as seen by the HiRISE camera on NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The pattern suggests th... More

Distinctive Brightness - NASA Mars images

Distinctive Brightness - NASA Mars images

This full-resolution image is centered on a bright deposit at the end of a gully channel. The bright deposit does not seem to be present in an image acquired several years earlier than 2009, and is likely to b... More

Comrades, all around is brightness

Comrades, all around is brightness

Music associated with the Union side

Comrades, all around is brightness

Comrades, all around is brightness

Music associated with the Union side

Comrades, all around is brightness

Comrades, all around is brightness

Music associated with the Union side

Comrades, all around is brightness

Comrades, all around is brightness

Music associated with the Union side