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New York, New York. Composing room of the New York Times newspaper. Mats are checked for faults and blemishes
Range : 12.9 million miles (8.0 million miles) P-29468C This false color Voyager photograph of Uranus shows a discrete cloud seen as a bright streak near the planets limb. The cloud visible here is the most prominent feature seen in a series of Voyager images designed to track atmospheric motions.  The occasional donut shaped features, including one at the bottom, are shadows cast by dust on the camera  optics. The picture is a highly processed composite of three images. The processing necessary to bring out the faint features on the planet also brings out these camera blemishes. The three seperate images used where shot through violet, blue, and orange filters. Each color image showd the cloud to a different degree; because they were not exposed at the same time , the images were processed to provide a good spatial match. In a true color image, the cloud would be barely discernable; the false color helps to bring out additional details. The different colors imply variations in vertical structure, but as of yet it is not possible to be specific about such differences. One possiblity is that the uranian atmosphere may contain smog like constituents, in which case some color differences may represent  differences in how these molecules are distributed. ARC-1986-AC86-7008

Range : 12.9 million miles (8.0 million miles) P-29468C This false col...

Range : 12.9 million miles (8.0 million miles) P-29468C This false color Voyager photograph of Uranus shows a discrete cloud seen as a bright streak near the planets limb. The cloud visible here is the most pro... More

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two images pictures of Uranus, one in true color and the other in false color, were shot by Voyager 2's  narrow angle camera. The picture at left has been processed  to show Uranus as the human eye would see from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The image is a composite of shots taken through blue, green, and orange filters. The darker shadings on the upper right of the disk correspond to day-night boundaries on the planet. Beyond this boundary lies the hidden northern hemisphere of Uranus, which currently remains in total darkness as the planet rotates. The blue-green color results from the aborption of red light  by methane gas  in Uranus' deep, cold, and remarkably clear atmosphere. The picture at right uses false color and extreme contrast to bring out subtle details in the polar region of Uranus. Images obtained through ultraviolet, violet, and orange filters were respectively converted to the same  blue, green, and red colors used to produce the picture at left. The very slight contrasts visible in true color are greatly exaggerated here. In this false colr picture, Uranus reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by aseries of progressively lighter concentric bands. One possible explanation is that a brownish haze or smog, concentrated around the pole, is arranged into bands of zonal motions of the upper atmosphere. Several artifacts of the optics and processing are visible. The occasional donut shapes are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics;the processing needed to bring ot faint features also bring out camera blemishes. in addition, the bright pink strip at the lower edge of the planets limb is an artifact of the image enhancement. In fact, the limb is dark and uniform in color around the planet. ARC-1986-AC86-7009

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two image...

Range : 9.1 million miles (5.7 million miles) P-29478C These two images pictures of Uranus, one in true color and the other in false color, were shot by Voyager 2's narrow angle camera. The picture at left has... More

Range :  280,000 km. ( 170,000 miles ) P-34726 BW Two 10 minute exposures of Neptune's rings clearly show the two main rings , as well as the inner faint ring and the faint band that extends planetward from roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The inner ring and the broad band are much fainter than the two narrow main rings. These images were taken 1 hour and 27 minutes aprt, using the clear filter on Voyager 2's wide angle camera. These long exposures images were taken while the rings were backlit by the sun. This viewing geometry enhances  the visibility of dust and allows optically thinner parts of the rings to be seen. The bright glare in the center is due to overexposure of the crescent of Neptune . The two gaps in the upper part of the outer ring in the image on the left are due to the removal of blemishes during computer processing of the images. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. ARC-1989-A89-7045

Range : 280,000 km. ( 170,000 miles ) P-34726 BW Two 10 minute exposu...

Range : 280,000 km. ( 170,000 miles ) P-34726 BW Two 10 minute exposures of Neptune's rings clearly show the two main rings , as well as the inner faint ring and the faint band that extends planetward from rou... More

Range :  1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Venus was taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shortly befor 10pm PST when the space craft was directly above Venus' equator.  This is the 66th of more than 80 Venus images Galileo was programmed to take and record during its Venus flyby.  In the picture, cloud features as small as 25 miles (40 km) can be seen.  Patches of waves and convective clouds are superimpposed on the swirl of the planet's broad weather patterns, marked by the dark chevron at the center.  North is at the top.  The several ring-shaped shadows are blemishes, not planetary features.  The spacecraft imaging system has a 1500-mm, f/8.5 reflecting telescope; the exposure time was 1/40 second.  The image was taken through the violet filter (0.41 micron.).  It was produced by the imaging system in digital form, as a set of numbers representing the brightness perceived in each of the 640,000 picture elements defined on the solid-state plate, called a charged-coupled-device or CCD, on which the image was focused. ARC-1990-A91-2000

Range : 1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Ve...

Range : 1 million miles (1.63 million km) This image of the planet Venus was taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shortly befor 10pm PST when the space craft was directly above Venus' equator. This is the 66th ... More