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Topic: backup

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657 media by topicpage 1 of 7
Astronaut Grissom talks to backup John Glenn prior to insertion

Astronaut Grissom talks to backup John Glenn prior to insertion

S61-02882 (1961) --- Astronaut Virgil I. (Gus) Grissom, suited up and ready to climb into Liberty Bell 7 spacecraft, talks with backup pilot John H. Glenn prior to insertion. The Mercury-Redstone 4 (MR-4) missi... more

Gemini 4 - Prime and Backup Crew

Gemini 4 - Prime and Backup Crew

S64-20199 (10 Sept. 1964) --- View of the Gemini-4 prime crew and backup crew in pressure suits. They are standing around a model of the Gemini spacecraft. From left to right are astronauts Edward H. White II, ... more

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-III BACKUP CREW - SIMULATOR - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-III BACKUP CREW - SIMULATOR - CAPE

S65-13920 (15 Jan. 1965) --- The Gemini-6 prime crew, astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (left), command pilot, and Thomas P. Stafford, pilot, are pictured in the Gemini simulator during training exercises at the... more

Photograph of Gemini IX Prime Crew Pilot Eugene A. Cernan and Backup Crew Pilot Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. during Water Egress Training

Photograph of Gemini IX Prime Crew Pilot Eugene A. Cernan and Backup C...

Original caption: GULF OF MEXICO. WATER EGRESS TRAINING - Two Gemini IX astronauts practice maneuvering one-man life rafts during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (foreg... more

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-III BACKUP CREW - TRAINING SIMULATOR  - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-III BACKUP CREW - TRAINING SIMULATOR - CAPE

S65-13921 (1965) --- Overhead view of astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (foreground), backup command pilot, and Thomas P. Stafford, backup pilot, as they prepare to run Gemini-Titan 3 simulations in the Gemini m... more

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - BACKUP CREW - WATER EGRESS - TRAINING - ELLINGTON AFB (EAFB), TX

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - BACKUP CREW - WATER EGRESS - TRAINING - ELLINGTO...

S65-10118 (1 Feb. 1965) --- The Gemini-6 prime crew, astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (in water), command pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford (on spacecraft), pilot, are pictured during water egress training at Ellin... more

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - PRIME AND BACKUP CREW PROGRAM

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-7 - PRIME AND BACKUP CREW PROGRAM

S65-41828 (September 1965) --- Portrait of the Gemini-7 prime and backup crew members around a model of the Gemini-7 spacecraft. The prime crew members for the Gemini-Titan 7 (GT-7) are astronauts Frank Borman ... more

RELAX ON DAY OF FLIGHT (BACKUP CREW) (GT-6) ASTRONAUT JOHN W. YOUNG - MISC.

RELAX ON DAY OF FLIGHT (BACKUP CREW) (GT-6) ASTRONAUT JOHN W. YOUNG - ...

Astronauts Young and Virgil I. Grissom relax on the day of the proposed Gemini 6 Mission. CAPE KENNEDY, FL

Gemini 7 backup crew seen in white room during Gemini 7 simulation activity

Gemini 7 backup crew seen in white room during Gemini 7 simulation act...

S65-61837 (27 Nov. 1965) --- The Gemini-7 backup crew seen in the White Room atop Pad 19 during Gemini-7 simulation flight activity. McDonnell Aircraft Corporation technicians assist in the exercise. Astronaut ... more

Portrait - Gemini 12 - Prime and Backup Crews

Portrait - Gemini 12 - Prime and Backup Crews

S66-46955 (September 1966) --- The Gemini-12 prime crew (in front) is astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (right), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (left), pilot. In the rear is the Gemini-12 backup crew, astr... more

Portrait - Gemini 9 Prime and Backup Crews

Portrait - Gemini 9 Prime and Backup Crews

S66-15622 (January 1966) --- Portrait of the Gemini 9 prime and backup crews. Seated are the Prime crew consisting of Astronauts Elliot M. See Jr. (left), command pilot, and Charles A. Bassett II, pilot. Standi... more

Portrait - Gemini 11 - Prime and Backup Crews

Portrait - Gemini 11 - Prime and Backup Crews

S66-50772 (7 Sept. 1966) --- The Gemini-Titan XI (GT-11) prime and backup crews pose for a group portrait. Seated is the prime crew, astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. (right), command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon J... more

Gemini 8 prime and backup crews during press conference

Gemini 8 prime and backup crews during press conference

S66-24380 (26 Feb. 1966) --- Gemini-8 prime and backup crews during press conference. Left to right are astronauts David R. Scott, prime crew pilot; Neil A. Armstrong, prime crew command pilot; Charles Conrad J... more

GORDON, RICHARD F., ASTRONAUT - TRAINING - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 SIMULATION - BACKUP IN SPACECRAFT (S/C) - CAPE

GORDON, RICHARD F., ASTRONAUT - TRAINING - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-8 SIMULAT...

S66-24403 (16 March 1966) --- Astronauts David R. Scott and Neil A. Armstrong inserted into Gemini-8 spacecraft prior to liftoff. Photo credit: NASA

Apollo 1 Prime and Backup Crews

Apollo 1 Prime and Backup Crews

S66-30238 (1 April 1966) --- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has named these astronauts as the prime crew of the first manned Apollo Space Flight. Left to right, are Edward H. White II,... more

PORTRAIT - PRIME AND BACKUP CREWS - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II

PORTRAIT - PRIME AND BACKUP CREWS - ASTRONAUT EDWARD H. WHITE II

S66-30236 (1 April 1966) --- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has named these astronauts as the prime crew of the first manned Apollo Space Flight. Left to right, are Edward H. White II,... more

Gemini 9 prime and backup crews during press conference - MSC

Gemini 9 prime and backup crews during press conference - MSC

S66-24580 (23 April 1966) --- The two crews of the Gemini-9 spaceflight appear before a gathering of news media representatives during a press conference in the MSC News Center, Building 6. Left to right, are a... more

Apollo 8 primary crew and backup crew portrait

Apollo 8 primary crew and backup crew portrait

View of the Apollo 8 primary and backup crew portrait with the spacecraft at night in the background. Back row: (l.-r.) Frank Borman, commander, James A. Lovell, command module pilot and William A. Anders, l... more

Apollo 9 backup crew on "Retriever"-Ships

Apollo 9 backup crew on "Retriever"-Ships

S68-51700 (November 1968) --- The backup crew of the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/ Lunar Module 3/ Saturn 504) space mission stands on the deck of the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever (MVR) prior to participating in wat... more

Apollo 11 - Prime and Backup Crews - Geology Training - TX

Apollo 11 - Prime and Backup Crews - Geology Training - TX

S69-25199 (25 Feb. 1969) --- Two Apollo 11 astronauts study a rock specimen during a geological field trip to the Quitman Mountains area near the Fort Quitman ruins in far west Texas. On the left is James A. L... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo 13 backup Lunar Module Pilot Charlie Duke, left, scoops up soil at the Kennedy Space Center while backup Commander John Young looks on. Photo credit: NASA KSC-70PC-67

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo 13 backup Lunar Module Pilot Charlie Du...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo 13 backup Lunar Module Pilot Charlie Duke, left, scoops up soil at the Kennedy Space Center while backup Commander John Young looks on. Photo credit: NASA

Apollo 16 prime and backup crewmen during geological field trip in New Mexico

Apollo 16 prime and backup crewmen during geological field trip in New...

Dr. Lee Silver (pointing foregroung), California Institute of Technology, calls a geological feature near Taos, New Mexico, to the attention of Apollo 16 prime and backup crewmen during a geological field trip.... more

American ASTP backup crew suited for testing of Apollo spacecraft

American ASTP backup crew suited for testing of Apollo spacecraft

S75-21063 (January 1975) --- The three members of the American ASTP backup crew are suited up for the testing of the Apollo spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center. They are (from foreground) astronauts Alan L. ... more

STS-1 - PRIME AND BACKUP - CREWMEMBERS (ASTRONAUTS) - BRIEFING - JSC

STS-1 - PRIME AND BACKUP - CREWMEMBERS (ASTRONAUTS) - BRIEFING - JSC

S81-29620 (6 April 1981) --- Prime and backup crew members for STS-1 take part in a briefing with engineers located in another building at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and with Rockwell International repre... more

STS-1 - PRIME AND BACKUP - CREWMEMBERS - TELECONFERENCE - JSC

STS-1 - PRIME AND BACKUP - CREWMEMBERS - TELECONFERENCE - JSC

S81-29618 (6 April 1981) --- STS-1 prime and backup astronaut crew members look at visuals during a coordinated teleconference with engineers. Seated at the table in a briefing room at NASA's Johnson Space Cent... more

A technician checks the diesel backup engine aboard the nuclear-powered attack submarine USS BILLFISH (SSN 676)

A technician checks the diesel backup engine aboard the nuclear-powere...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Billfish (SSN 676) Scene Camera Operator: Fred Maroon Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

STS-2 backup Crewmen Lousma and Fullerton in the bldg 5 Shuttle simulator

STS-2 backup Crewmen Lousma and Fullerton in the bldg 5 Shuttle simula...

S81-36714 (14 Nov. 1981) --- These two veteran astronauts were named today as the official prime crew members of STS-3 in the space shuttle Columbia. Commander for NASA?s third space shuttle orbital flight test... more

The 16-inch gun turret on the aft section of the battleship USS IOWA (BB 61) during its reactivation at Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp. The circular structure to the left is the base for SKY-4, the aft 5-inch gun director which serves as a backup for the 16-inch main battery gun director

The 16-inch gun turret on the aft section of the battleship USS IOWA (...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pascagoula State: Mississippi (MS) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH1 Jeff Hilton Release Status: Released to Pu... more

The 16-inch gun turret on the aft section of the battleship USS IOWA (BB 61) during its reactivation at Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp. The circular structure to the left is the base for SKY-4, the aft 5-inch gun director which serves as a backup for the 16-inch main battery gun director

The 16-inch gun turret on the aft section of the battleship USS IOWA (...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Pascagoula State: Mississippi (MS) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: PH1 Jeff Hilton Release Status: Released to Pu... more

A view of the combat information center of the guided missile destroyer USS RICHARD E. BYRD (DDG 23). From left to right are: target/selector and tracking console, the Tarter guided missile systems with a backup unit and the Mark 63 Tarter system

A view of the combat information center of the guided missile destroye...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Norfolk State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Don S. Montgomery, Usn (Ret.) Release Status: Releas... more

View of backup payload specialist Robert Thirsk during Zero-G training

View of backup payload specialist Robert Thirsk during Zero-G training

S84-37532 (18 July 1984) --? Robert B. Thirsk, backup payload specialist for 41-G appears to be shaking hands with an unoccupied extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) during a familiarization flight aboard NASA?s ... more

A landing signal officer (LSO) talks to an imcoming pilot from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS MIDWAY (CV 41), as his backup helps keep track of the approach

A landing signal officer (LSO) talks to an imcoming pilot from the fli...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: PH1 Paul Soutar Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

Barbara Morgan, 51-L backup payload specialist, at Memorial service

Barbara Morgan, 51-L backup payload specialist, at Memorial service

51L-S-108 (31 Jan. 1986) --- Barbara R. Morgan, 51-L backup payload specialist to Christa McAuliffe, with others on the stage at the Memorial service for the Challenger Seven at JSC. Photo credit: NASA

An EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft refuels a second Stratolifter assuming the position of Looking Glass, the code name for the backup command and control post of Strategic Air Command (SAC). In the event that SAC's underground command center was destroyed by enemy attack, the crew of the flying command center would assume all functions from the air. Three Looking Glass sorties are flown daily by the 2nd Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS) and the 4th ACCS

An EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft refuels a second Stratolifter assuming...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: CHIEF MASTER SGT. Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

Weather officers CPT Ivan Friend, left, and CPT Alan Haberecht, along with engineer CPT George Auten pose for a photograph aboard an EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft code-named Looking Glass. The aircraft acts as the backup command and control post for the Strategic Air Command's (SAC) underground command center. Its crew would assume all functions in the event that SAC's underground center was destroyed by enemy attack. Three Looking Glass sorties are flown daily by the 2nd Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS) and the 4th ACCS

Weather officers CPT Ivan Friend, left, and CPT Alan Haberecht, along ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: CMSGT Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

SSGT Donald Anderson, boom operator for emergency refueling operations, stands by prior to a flight in an EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft code-named Looking Glass. The aircraft acts as the backup command and control post for the Strategic Air Command's (SAC) underground command center. Its crew would assume all functions in the event that SAC's underground center was destroyed by enemy attack. Three Looking Glass sorties are flown daily by the 2nd Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS) and the 4th ACCS

SSGT Donald Anderson, boom operator for emergency refueling operations...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: CMSGT Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

The air crew of an EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft, background, which functions as the backup command and control post of Strategic Air Command (SAC), poses for a group photograph prior to a mission. In the event that SAC's underground command center was destroyed by enemy attack, the crew of the flying command center, code-named Looking Glass, would assume all functions from the air. Three Looking Glass sorties are flown daily by the 2nd Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS) and the 4th ACCS

The air crew of an EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft, background, which fun...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: CMSGT Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

SGT Thomas Buhr repairs a radio system aboard an EC-135 Stratolifter aircraft code-named Looking Glass. The aircraft acts as the backup command and control post for the Strategic Air Command's (SAC) underground command center and its crew would assume all functions in the event that SAC's underground center was destroyed by enemy attack. Three Looking Glass sorties are flown daily by the 2nd Airborne Command and Control Squadron (ACCS) and the 4th ACCS

SGT Thomas Buhr repairs a radio system aboard an EC-135 Stratolifter a...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: CMSGT Don Sutherland Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A landing signal officer (LSO) and his backup stand by at their station aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN 71)

A landing signal officer (LSO) and his backup stand by at their statio...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Scene Camera Operator: PH3 Borbely Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A landing signal officer communicates with the pilot of an incoming aircraft as his backup crew members monitor the aircraft's approach in preparation for its landing aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT (CVN 71)

A landing signal officer communicates with the pilot of an incoming ai...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Scene Camera Operator: PH3 Borbely Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

A landing signal officer and his backup each hold up a pickle switch, ready to signal a waveoff to the pilot of an aircraft approaching the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

A landing signal officer and his backup each hold up a pickle switch, ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69) Country: Mediterranean Sea (MED) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy Lee Didas Release Status: Released to Public C... more

A landing signal officer (LSO) and his backup watch as a Fighter Squadron 142 (VF-142) F-14A Tomcat aircraft comes in for a landing aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN-69)

A landing signal officer (LSO) and his backup watch as a Fighter Squad...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Mediterranean Sea (MED) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy Lee Didas Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photogr... more

STS-45 backup Payload Specialist Chappell during water egress training at JSC

STS-45 backup Payload Specialist Chappell during water egress training...

S91-52074 (26 Nov 1991) --- Charles R. (Rick) Chappell, alternate payload specialist, equipped with simulated parachute gear, descends into the water during bail-out training exercises in the Johnson Space Cent... more

Official portrait of STS-65 backup Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Favier

Official portrait of STS-65 backup Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Fav...

Official portrait of STS-65 International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) backup Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Favier. Favier is a member of the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French space agency.

A battery of three U.S. Army M-155 howitzers and their assortment backup equipment are shown in a emplacement camp near Green Beach adjacent to the Mogadishu International Airport. The battery will remain in place until the withdraw of all U.S. forces on the 25thd of March

A battery of three U.S. Army M-155 howitzers and their assortment back...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Modadishu Country: Somalia (SOM) Scene Camera Operator: JOC Millie Tamberg Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital P... more

Construction Mechanic Striker (CMCN) Mike Edgar works on a Light Plant Generator, a backup generator for Fleet Hospital Zagreb which stores energy to produce light in case several casualties arrive.(Exact date unknown)

Construction Mechanic Striker (CMCN) Mike Edgar works on a Light Plant...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: PROVIDE PROMISE Base: Zagreb Country: Croatia (CRO) Scene Camera Operator: TSGT. Lynchard Release Status: Released to Public... more

Overall view of backup communications center deployed to Pope AFB, NC in support of Operation Uphold Democracy

Overall view of backup communications center deployed to Pope AFB, NC ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: UPHOLD DEMOCRACY Base: Pope Air Force Base State: North Carolina (NC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera O... more

Overall view on 23 Sept. 94 of the 612th ACOMS backup communications center deployed to Pope AFB, NC. in support of Operation Uphold Democracy

Overall view on 23 Sept. 94 of the 612th ACOMS backup communications c...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: UPHOLD DEMOCRACY Base: Pope Air Force Base State: North Carolina (NC) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera O... more

Sailors on board the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) hustle to rig the Manually Operated Visual Landing Aid System during an emergency drill, March 18, 1996. The MOVLAS is an emergency backup for the Fresnel Lens, which is the visual guide pilots rely on when approaching an aircraft carrier for arrested landing. Members of George Washington's V-2 Division set a new Naval-Air Force-Atlantic record during the drill, successfully rigging the MOVLAS in 50 seconds, shattering the old time of 55 seconds. USS George Washington, commanded by CAPT Malcolm P. Branch, is currently on a scheduled six-month deployment, participating in the NATO-led peace keeping...

Sailors on board the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: [Complete] Scene Caption: Sailors on board the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) hustle to rig the Manually Operated Visual... more

Implementation Force (IFOR) troops in support of Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR (the multi-national peace mission in Bosnia) and locals work together to get a generator, to be used as backup power for the Mt. Bukovik radio transmission site, on a truck for its haul to the site. The generator will eventually help supply telephone service to Gorazde, Bosnia-Herzegovina

Implementation Force (IFOR) troops in support of Operation JOINT ENDEA...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: JOINT ENDEAVOR Base: Mount Bukovik Country: Bosnia And/I Herzegovina (BIH) Scene Camera Operator: SRA Stan Parker, USAF Rele... more

SENIOR AIRMAN Chris Galindo, of the 99th Communications Squadron starts a power generator which will provide backup power for personnel participating in the Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada Operational Readiness Inspection exercise. Nellis is home to the 57th Wing, 99th Air Base Wing, USAF Weapons School and the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron (Thunderbirds) and is located near Las Vegas, Nev

SENIOR AIRMAN Chris Galindo, of the 99th Communications Squadron start...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Nellis Air Force Base State: Nevada (NV) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: SRA Billy Johnson Release Status: Releas... more

The STS-83 crew poses in the White Room at Launch Complex 39A during the crew's <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/40-97.htm">Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT).</a> From left to right, standing, they are Payload Specialist Gregory T. Linteris, Pilot Susan L. Still, Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt, Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch, and Mission Specialists Donald Thomas and Janice E. Voss. Cady Coleman, the backup Mission Specialist for Donald Thomas, is kneeling on the right KSC-97pc457

The STS-83 crew poses in the White Room at Launch Complex 39A during t...

The STS-83 crew poses in the White Room at Launch Complex 39A during the crew's <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/1997/40-97.htm">Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT).</a> From left to... more

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc715

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Can...

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new adva... more

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc712

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Can...

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new adva... more

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc716

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Can...

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new adva... more

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc714

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Can...

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new adva... more

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-K is built for NASA and NOAA by Space Systems/LORAL of Palo Alto, Calif. The advanced weather satellite was built and launched for NOAA under technical guidance and project management by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Once it is in geosynchronous orbit at 22,240 miles above the Earth’s equator at 105 degrees West Longitude and undergoes its final checkout, the GOES-K will be designated GOES-10. The primary objective of the GOES-K launch is to provide a full-capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition to assure NOAA backup continuity in weather coverage of the Earth in case one of the existing two operational GOES satellites now in orbit begins to malfunction KSC-97pc713

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Can...

The GOES-K weather satellite lifts off from Launch Pad 36B at Cape Canaveral Air Station on an Atlas 1 rocket (AC-79) at 1:49 a.m. EDT April 25. The GOES-K is the third spacecraft to be launched in the new adva... more

Aviation Ordnanceman First Class Bradley Bunde (right), a backup diver in case of an emergency, is assisted by support personnel from Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 7 from San Diego, California

Aviation Ordnanceman First Class Bradley Bunde (right), a backup diver...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Big Spruce Lake State: Colorado (CO) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT David W. Richards Release Status: Relea... more

Raven instructor STAFF SGT. James Warrick demonstrates an arm lock as TECH. SGT. Randy Foster, playing the "intruder" grimaces in pain. STAFF SGT. Jackie Cruse another instructor, provides backup. All men are Phoenix Raven instructors assigned to the Air Mobility Command's Air Mobility Warfare Center at Fort Dix, N.J. and teach a week-long course to elite security troops handpicked by Air Mobility Command.Exact Date Shot Unknown. Published in AIRMAN Magazine November 1997

Raven instructor STAFF SGT. James Warrick demonstrates an arm lock as ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Mcguire Air Force Base State: New Jersey (NJ) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: TSGT. John Mcdowell Release Status:... more

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia from pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), participates in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) at KSC. Standing, from left, are Mission Specialist Winston Scott; backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, Ph.D., of the National Space Agency of Ukraine (NSAU); Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of NSAU; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Commander Kevin Kregel; Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight providing the crew of each mission opportunities to participate in simulated countdown activities. The TCDT ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cut-off. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the pad and has an opportunity to view and inspect the payloads in the orbiter's payload bay KSC-97PC1606

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard th...

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia from pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), participates in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) at KSC... more

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia from Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), poses at the pad during a break in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) at KSC. Standing in front of the Shuttle Columbia are, from left, Commander Kevin Kregel; Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, Ph.D., of the National Space Agency of Ukraine (NSAU); Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of NSAU; and Mission Specialist Winston Scott. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight providing the crew of each mission opportunities to participate in simulated countdown activities. The TCDT ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cutoff. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the pad and has an opportunity to view and inspect the payloads in the orbiter's payload bay KSC-97PC1605

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard th...

The crew of the STS-87 mission, scheduled for launch Nov. 19 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia from Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), poses at the pad during a break in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration... more

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, shakes hands with Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk, at right, as backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, both of the National Space Agency of Ukraine, looks on during prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 launch of STS-87. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Kadenyuk will pollinate Brassica rapa plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment, or CUE, aboard Columbia during its 16-day mission. The CUE experiment is a collection of 10 plant space biology experiments that will fly in Columbia's middeck and will feature an educational component that involves evaluating the effects of microgravity on Brassica rapa seedlings. Students in Ukrainian and American schools will participate in the same experiment with Kadenyuk in space. Kadenyuk will be flying his first Shuttle mission on STS-87 KSC-97PC1685

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, shakes hands with Payload...

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, shakes hands with Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk, at right, as backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, both of the National Space Agency of Ukraine, looks o... more

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, is flanked by Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk, at left, and backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, at right, both of the National Space Agency of Ukraine, during prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 launch of STS-87. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite. During the mission, Kadenyuk will pollinate Brassica rapa plants as part of the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment, or CUE, aboard Columbia during its 16-day mission. The CUE experiment is a collection of 10 plant space biology experiments that will fly in Columbia's middeck and will feature an educational component that involves evaluating the effects of microgravity on Brassica rapa seedlings. Students in Ukrainian and American schools will participate in the same experiment with Kadenyuk in space. Kadenyuk will be flying his first Shuttle mission on STS-87 KSC-97PC1684

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, is flanked by Payload Spe...

The president of the Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, is flanked by Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk, at left, and backup Payload Specialist Yaroslav Pustovyi, at right, both of the National Space Agency of Ukraine, d... more

Members of the STS-90 flight crew train in the braking pit area for the emergency egress system slidewire baskets for Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for that mission. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight to provide crews with the opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. From left to right are Commander Richard Searfoss, Mission Specialist Kathryn (Kay) Hire, Pilot Scott Altman, Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D. (behind), Mission Specialist Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D., and Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan, D.V.M. Backup Payload Specialists Alexander Dunlap (holding camera), D.V.M., M.D., and Chiaki Mukai, M.D., Ph.D., with the National Space Development Agency of Japan are also listening to USA technical trainer Bob Parks' instruction. Columbia is targeted for launch of STS-90 on April 16 at 2:19 p.m. EDT and will be the second mission of 1998. The mission is scheduled to last nearly 17 days KSC-98pc438

Members of the STS-90 flight crew train in the braking pit area for th...

Members of the STS-90 flight crew train in the braking pit area for the emergency egress system slidewire baskets for Launch Pad 39B during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for that missi... more

The GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in March or April, is covered and waiting on a semi-trailer truck (in background) that will transport it to Astrotech in Titusville for final testing. It arrived aboard the C-5 air cargo plane (seen in foreground) at CCAS. GOES-L, the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-98pc1873

The GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air S...

The GOES-L weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in March or April, is covered and waiting on a semi-trailer truck (in background) that will transpor... more

The GOES-L weather satellite, aboard the trailer, is moved into a building at Astrotech in Titusville for testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in March or April, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-98pc1874

The GOES-L weather satellite, aboard the trailer, is moved into a buil...

The GOES-L weather satellite, aboard the trailer, is moved into a building at Astrotech in Titusville for testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite, to be l... more

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., check out the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc18

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., check out the solar pane...

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., check out the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Cape C... more

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be performed are the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc21

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deploy...

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be perfor... more

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., stand back as they deploy the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc17

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., stand back as they deplo...

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., stand back as they deploy the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satell... more

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., deploy one of the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc16

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., deploy one of the solar ...

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., deploy one of the solar panels of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite, to be launched from Ca... more

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be performed are the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc22

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deploy...

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., Loral workers check trim tab deployment on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. Other tests to be perfor... more

The solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite are fully deployed. Final testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communications and power systems also will be performed at the Astrotech facility, Titusville, Fla. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc19

The solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/ca...

The solar panels on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite are fully deployed. Final testing of the imaging system, instrumentation, communica... more

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., perform an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc26

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., perform an illumination ...

Loral workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., perform an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</... more

Workers (right) at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., arrange the lights for an illumination test on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The test is verifying the circuitry on the panel. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc29

Workers (right) at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., arrange the lights for...

Workers (right) at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., arrange the lights for an illumination test on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather... more

A Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., assists with an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc27

A Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., assists with an illumin...

A Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., assists with an illumination test for circuitry verification on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GO... more

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc28

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, ...

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weat... more

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The satellite is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March. The GOES-L is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc30

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, ...

During an illumination test, a Loral worker at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., verifies circuitry on the solar panel of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weat... more

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero tests the deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc50

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at ...

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero tests the deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door on the <a... more

In a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero checks the position of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite before beginning deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc52

In a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral ...

In a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technician Roberto Caballero checks the position of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a>... more

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technicians Roberto Caballero (left) and Paul Giordano (right) maneuver the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/goes-l.htm">GOES-L</a> weather satellite into position for testing the deployment of the sounder instrument's cooler cover door. The sounder, one of two meteorological instruments on the satellite, measures temperature and moisture in a vertical column of air from the satellite to Earth. Its findings will help forecast weather. GOES-L, which is to be launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard an Atlas II rocket in late March, is the fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures as well as perform the atmospheric sounding. Once launched, the satellite, to be designated GOES-11, will undergo checkout and provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging GOES East weather satellite KSC-99pc51

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at ...

With the light casting a rosy glow in a specially built clean room at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., Loral technicians Roberto Caballero (left) and Paul Giordano (right) maneuver the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.n... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers help guide the crane lifting a Centaur upper stage onto a transporter. The Centaur arrived at CCAS aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c (far left). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0388

At Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers help guide the crane lif...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), workers help guide the crane lifting a Centaur upper stage onto a transporter. The Centaur arrived at CCAS aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c (far left). After being mated with t... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure a Centaur upper stage on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (right). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0387

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure a Centaur upper stage on...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure a Centaur upper stage on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (right). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is sched... more

An Atlas IIA rocket is transported from Cape Canaveral Air Station after its arrival aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0385

An Atlas IIA rocket is transported from Cape Canaveral Air Station aft...

An Atlas IIA rocket is transported from Cape Canaveral Air Station after its arrival aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading an Atlas IIA rocket from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36B on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0383

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading an Atlas IIA r...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading an Atlas IIA rocket from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36B on May 15. Once in orbit, ... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure an Atlas IIA rocket on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (left). The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0384

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure an Atlas IIA rocket on a...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure an Atlas IIA rocket on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (left). The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch ... more

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading a Centaur upper stage from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0386

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading a Centaur uppe...

At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading a Centaur upper stage from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L sate... more

Workers at Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L satellite for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0393

Workers at Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L satellit...

Workers at Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L satellite for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite ... more

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L satellite sits ready for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0395

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L satellite sits ready for...

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L satellite sits ready for a media showing. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will ... more

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., GOES-L Program Manager Gerald Dittberner, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) talks with a journalist during a media showing of the GOES-L satellite in the background. The GOES-L is due to be launched May 15 from Launch Pad 36A aboard an Atlas IIA rocket. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0394

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., GOES-L Program Manager Gerald Dittb...

At Astrotech, in Titusville, Fla., GOES-L Program Manager Gerald Dittberner, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) talks with a journalist during a media showing of the GOES-L satellit... more

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is mated to the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0429

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage i...

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is mated to the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the o... more

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket seen behind it. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0427

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage i...

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket seen behind it. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Cen... more

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is moved into place above the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0428

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage i...

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is moved into place above the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pr... more

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket already in place. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites KSC-99pp0426

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage i...

At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket already in place. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured C... more

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite undergoes encapsulation in the first half of the fairing before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. At right is the second half of the fairing. The mounted equipment on top of the satellite is a telemetry and command antenna. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0490

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite undergoes...

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite undergoes encapsulation in the first half of the fairing before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. At right is the second ha... more

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the fully encapsulated GOES-L weather satellite is ready for transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0493

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the fully encapsulated GOES-L weather ...

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the fully encapsulated GOES-L weather satellite is ready for transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather ... more

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand, ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space KSC-99pp0488

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite sits on a...

At Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., the GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand, ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a L... more

Workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L weather satellite for encapsulation in the fairing (left and right) before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The mounted equipment on top of the satellite is a telemetry and command antenna. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May KSC-99pp0491

Workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L weather sat...

Workers at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., prepare the GOES-L weather satellite for encapsulation in the fairing (left and right) before its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The mounted equi... more

The GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. On the left side is the folded, two-panel solar array; on the adjoining side is a white box, which is the UHF antenna. Above the box is the S-band transmit antenna and receive antenna. Between them protrudes a search and rescue antenna. At right are the sounder (top) and imager (bottom). The mounted equipment on top of the unit is a telemetry and command antenna. The GOES is scheduled for launch aboard a Lockheed Martin Atlas II rocket later in May. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. After it is launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space KSC-99pp0489

The GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand at Astrotech, Titusvi...

The GOES-L weather satellite sits on a workstand at Astrotech, Titusville, Fla., ready to be encapsulated for its transfer to Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. On the left side is the folded, two-pane... more