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68 media by topicpage 1 of 1
Dr. Blake's Hospital, showing wounded soldier with arm extension used for fractured arm

Dr. Blake's Hospital, showing wounded soldier with arm extension used ...

Title and note information from Red Cross caption card. Group title: Military Hospitals. Plate to Secy. Genl. Print in album. Date based on date range for negative series. Gift; American National Red Cross 1944... more

Ward in Dr. Blake's Hospital showing leg extension and arm extension

Ward in Dr. Blake's Hospital showing leg extension and arm extension

Title and note information from Red Cross caption card. Group title: Military Hospitals. Plate to Secy. Genl. Print in album. Date based on date range for negative series. Gift; American National Red Cross 1944... more

Dr. Blakes hospital, picture showing wounded soldier with arm extension used for fractured arm

Dr. Blakes hospital, picture showing wounded soldier with arm extensio...

Title, date and notes from Red Cross caption card. Photographer name or source of original from caption card or negative sleeve: French Official. Group title: Hospitals, Military relief, France. On caption card... more

Ward in Dr. Blakes hospital showing leg extension and arm extension

Ward in Dr. Blakes hospital showing leg extension and arm extension

Title, date and notes from Red Cross caption card. Photographer name or source of original from caption card or negative sleeve: French Official. Group title: Hospitals, France. On caption card: (182) Data: H.E... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is towed from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building in the background.  Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 after 11 days in space, completing the 4.5-million mile STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on orbit 171.   Once Atlantis arrives in Orbiter Processing Facility-1, processing will begin for its next mission, designated STS-132.    The 34th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, Atlantis will deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module, or MRM, to the orbiting laboratory on STS-132.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the MRM will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. Three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-Purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6628

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is towed from the Shuttle Landing Facility toward the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building in the background. Atlanti... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after 11 days in space, completing the 4.5-million mile STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on orbit 171.   In OPF-1, processing will begin for its next mission, designated STS-132.    The 34th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, Atlantis will deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module, or MRM, to the orbiting laboratory on STS-132.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the MRM will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. Three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-Purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6629

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility af... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis begins its slow trek from the Shuttle Landing Facility to Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1.  Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 after 11 days in space, completing the 4.5-million mile STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on orbit 171.   In OPF-1, processing will begin for Atlantis' next mission, designated STS-132.    The 34th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, Atlantis will deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module, or MRM, to the orbiting laboratory on STS-132.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the MRM will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. Three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-Purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6626

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis begins its slow trek from the Shuttle Landing Facility to Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is towed from the Shuttle Landing Facility to Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1.  Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 after 11 days in space, completing the 4.5-million mile STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on orbit 171.   In OPF-1, processing will begin for Atlantis' next mission, designated STS-132.    The 34th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, Atlantis will deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module, or MRM, to the orbiting laboratory on STS-132.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the MRM will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. Three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-Purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6627

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis is towed from the Shuttle Landing Facility to Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down on Runway 3... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility after 11 days in space, completing the 4.5-million mile STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on orbit 171.   In OPF-1, processing will begin for its next mission, designated STS-132.    The 34th shuttle mission to the International Space Station, Atlantis will deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module, or MRM, to the orbiting laboratory on STS-132.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the MRM will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. Three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-Purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6630

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis arrives at Orbiter Processing Facility-1, or OPF-1. Atlantis touched down on Runway 33 at the Shuttle Landing Facility af... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians back one of three main engines on space shuttle Atlantis away from the shuttle using a specially designed Hyster engine lift.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis next is slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6728

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians back one of three main engines on space shuttle Atlantis away from the sh... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians attach a specially designed Hyster engine lift to one of three main engines on space shuttle Atlantis as they prepare to remove it.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6724

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians attach a specially designed Hyster engine lift to one of three main engin... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians monitor the removal of one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlantis from their stations on a specially designed Hyster engine lift.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis next is slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6726

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians monitor the removal of one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlan... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of three main engines on space shuttle Atlantis has been removed using a specially designed Hyster engine lift.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis next is slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, one of three main engines on space shuttle Atlantis has been removed using a specially designed Hyster engi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to remove one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlantis using a specially designed Hyster engine lift.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6723

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to remove one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlantis u... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlantis using a specially designed Hyster engine lift.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure following a shuttle mission.  Atlantis next is slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2009-6725

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove one of three main engines from space shuttle Atlantis using a spec... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, work to prepare the space shuttle main engines for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission is under way.    Inspection and maintenance of each main engine is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6813

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Fac...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, work to prepare the space shuttle main engines for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane deposits the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, onto a transporter.  The MRM was delivered to Kennedy aboard the Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, in the background.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6860

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane deposits the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, onto a tra... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers roll the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from the cargo bay of a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6858

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers roll the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from the cargo... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare to offload the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6853

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare to offload the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-1... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, lands at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida with the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, aboard.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6852

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Ru...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, lands at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida with the Russian-built Mini Research Module1... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, delivers the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, to the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6851

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Ru...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, delivers the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, to the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare to roll the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from the cargo bay of a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6857

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare to roll the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, fro... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to offload the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6854

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to offload the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from a Volga-Dnepr Anton... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, awaits offloading from a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6856

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, awaits offloading from a Volg... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare a crane to assist with the offloading of the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from a Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6855

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers prepare a crane to assist with the offloading of the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, from ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, begins its trip from the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Astrotech Space Operations facility in Titusville, Fla., where it will undergo final processing for flight.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6861

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, begins its trip from the Shuttle Landing Facility to the Astrotech Space Operations facility i... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, is lifted onto a transporter.  The MRM was delivered to Kennedy aboard the Volga-Dnepr Antonov AN-124-100, a Ukranian/Russian aircraft, in the background.    The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module, named Rassvet, will be permanently attached to the International Space Station's Zarya module on space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 mission. An Integrated Cargo Carrier will join the MRM in Atlantis' payload bay. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock, and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also will be delivered to the station.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-6859

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kenne...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the transportation case protecting the Russian-built Mini Research Module1, or MRM1, is lifted onto a transporte... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, from a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the RCC panels and the wing leading edge are standard procedure between shuttle missions.  The RCC panels, components of the shuttle's thermal protection system, are placed in protective coverings while the structural edge of the wing -- the orange and green area behind the panels -- undergoes spar corrosion inspection to verify the structural integrity of the wing. Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1084

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, from a wing leading ed... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians roll the test equipment away from an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis following the successful completion of a push test.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1076

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians roll the test equipment away from an external tank door on space shuttle Atla... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, works inside the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis following removal of window #8.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1083

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, works inside the crew module of space shuttle Atl... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, does his part in the removal of window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1081

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, does his part in the removal of window #8 from th... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician inspects a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis following removal of the reinforced carbon carbon panels, or RCC panels.    Inspection and maintenance of the RCC panels and the wing leading edge are standard procedure between shuttle missions.  The RCC panels, components of the shuttle's thermal protection system, are placed in protective coverings while the structural edge of the wing -- the orange and green area behind the panels -- undergoes spar corrosion inspection to verify the structural integrity of the wing. Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1088

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician inspects a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis following removal of ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician inspects a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the RCC panels and the wing leading edge are standard procedure between shuttle missions.  The RCC panels, components of the shuttle's thermal protection system, are placed in protective coverings while the structural edge of the wing -- the orange and green area behind the panels -- undergoes spar corrosion inspection to verify the structural integrity of the wing. Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1086

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician inspects a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from a wing... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians verify the alignment of the test equipment that will be used to perform a push test on an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1072

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians verify the alignment of the test equipment that will be used to perform a pus... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to perform a push test on an external tank door beneath space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1071

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to perform a push test on an external tank door beneath space shuttle... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying prone on a work platform, prepares to remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1079

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying prone on a work platform, prepares to remove window #8 from the top o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians study the results of a push test performed on an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1075

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians study the results of a push test performed on an external tank door on space ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians perform a push test on an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1073

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians perform a push test on an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis. Tw... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians cover a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the RCC panels and the wing leading edge are standard procedure between shuttle missions.  The RCC panels, components of the shuttle's thermal protection system, are placed in protective coverings while the structural edge of the wing -- the orange and green area behind the panels -- undergoes spar corrosion inspection to verify the structural integrity of the wing. Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1085

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians cover a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from a wing lea... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove the test equipment that was used to perform a push test on an external tank door on space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1074

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians remove the test equipment that was used to perform a push test on an external... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, takes steps to remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1080

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician, lying on a work platform, takes steps to remove window #8 from the top of t... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians, lying on a work platform, remove window #8 from the top of the crew module of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1082

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians, lying on a work platform, remove window #8 from the top of the crew module o... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to perform a push test on an external tank door, shown in this close-up, of space shuttle Atlantis.    Two umbilical doors, located on the shuttle's aft fuselage, close after external tank separation following launch. The test confirms that the door's actuators are functioning properly and that signals sent from the actuators correctly indicate that the doors have closed, creating the necessary thermal barrier for reentry.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1070

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to perform a push test on an external tank door, shown in this close-up, of space sh... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to cover a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from a wing leading edge of space shuttle Atlantis.    Inspection and maintenance of the RCC panels and the wing leading edge are standard procedure between shuttle missions.  The RCC panels, components of the shuttle's thermal protection system, are placed in protective coverings while the structural edge of the wing -- the orange and green area behind the panels -- undergoes spar corrosion inspection to verify the structural integrity of the wing. Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1087

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to cover a reinforced carbon carbon panel, or RCC panel, removed from... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, is carefully inspected by United Space Alliance technicians.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1201

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, is carefully inspected by United Space ... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this close-up shows the forward transition and X-guide restraint of the inspection boom assembly, or IBA, on space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS.  The IBA is removed from the shuttle every other processing flow for a detailed inspection. After five consecutive flights, all IBA internal components are submitted to a thorough electrical checkout in the lab.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1198

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this close-up shows the forward transition and X-guide restraint of th... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician diligently inspects window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, for any anomaly.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1202

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician diligently inspects window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlanti... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS, awaits inspection.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1193

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS, awaits in... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Patrick Manning, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance, installs the mid-transition thermal blanket onto the inspection boom assembly, or IBA, on space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS.  The IBA is removed from the shuttle every other processing flow for a detailed inspection. After five consecutive flights, all IBA internal components are submitted to a thorough electrical checkout in the lab.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1196

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Patrick Manning, an advanced systems technician with United Space Alli... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians discuss the condition of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for inspection.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1203

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians discuss the condition of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atl... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab, or RMS Lab, inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Rafael Rodriguez, lead RMS advanced systems technician with United Space Alliance, installs the mid-transition thermal blanket onto the inspection boom assembly, or IBA, on space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS.  The IBA is removed from the shuttle every other processing flow for a detailed inspection. After five consecutive flights, all IBA internal components are submitted to a thorough electrical checkout in the lab.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1197

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab, or RMS La...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab, or RMS Lab, inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Rafael Rodriguez, lead RMS advanced systems technician wi... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS, is prepared for maintenance.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1194

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS, is prepar... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, undergoes a thorough inspection by United Space Alliance technicians.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1200

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module, undergoes a thorough inspection by Unit... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this close-up shows the electrical flight grapple fixture which will be installed in the forward transition and X-guide restraint of the inspection boom assembly, or IBA, on space shuttle Atlantis' orbiter boom sensor system, or OBSS.  The IBA is removed from the shuttle every other processing flow for a detailed inspection. After five consecutive flights, all IBA internal components are submitted to a thorough electrical checkout in the lab.    The 50-foot-long OBSS attaches to the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm and supports the cameras and laser systems used to inspect the shuttle’s thermal protection system while in space.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.  Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2010-1195

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In the Remote Manipulator System Lab inside the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this close-up shows the electrical flight grapple fixture which will b... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians inspect window #8 which was removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson KSC-2010-1199

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians inspect window #8 which was removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' c... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians ensure that the opening on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for window #8 is ready for installation of the window.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1230

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians ensure that the opening on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module for win... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8 is installed on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module after a thorough inspection.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1231

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, window #8 is installed on top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module after a thorough inspection. Inspectio... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician working on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module checks the placement of newly installed window #8.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1232

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician working on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module checks the placeme... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians clean the opening where window #8 will be installed on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1229

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians clean the opening where window #8 will be installed on the top of space shutt... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the inspection of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1227

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the inspection of window #8, removed from the top of space shuttle A... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician prepares to install window #8 on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew module.     Inspection and maintenance of the crew module windows is standard procedure between shuttle missions.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission.  The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14.  Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2010-1228

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a United Space Alliance technician prepares to install window #8 on the top of space shuttle Atlantis' crew mod... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to install the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2010-1243

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to install the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis. The chin panel is a semicirc... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians position the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis for installation.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1246

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians position the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis for installation. The ch... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians determine the proper placement for the chin panel being installed on space shuttle Atlantis.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1247

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians determine the proper placement for the chin panel being installed on space sh... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of United Space Alliance technicians lifts the chin panel toward space shuttle Atlantis for installation.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1245

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of United Space Alliance technicians lifts the chin panel toward space shuttle Atlantis for installation... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of United Space Alliance technicians installs the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1248

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a team of United Space Alliance technicians installs the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis. The chin pane... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the installation of the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1249

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians complete the installation of the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis. The... more

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to install the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis.    The chin panel is a semicircular-shaped section of reinforced carbon-carbon that fits under the shuttle's nose cap and is part of its thermal protection system.  Atlantis is next slated to deliver an Integrated Cargo Carrier and Russian-built Mini Research Module to the International Space Station on the STS-132 mission. The second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, the module will be permanently attached to the Zarya module. Three spacewalks are planned to store spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight.  Launch is targeted for May 14, 2010.    Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky KSC-2010-1244

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kenn...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - In Orbiter Processing Facility 1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, United Space Alliance technicians prepare to install the chin panel on space shuttle Atlantis. The chin pane... more