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1935 DeSoto automobile

1935 DeSoto automobile

1935 DeSoto automobile..Photographer: .Unknown..Subjects (LCSH):.DeSoto automobile.Automobiles.Lakes.Mountains..Digital Collection: .Transportation Collection.content.lib.washington.edu/transportationweb/index.... More

Drive Fan for the Icing Research Tunnel

Drive Fan for the Icing Research Tunnel

View of the drive fan for the Icing Research Tunnel at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory in Cleveland, Ohio. The tunnel was built in the early 1940s to s... More

XB-70A landing with drag chutes deployed

XB-70A landing with drag chutes deployed

(1960's) This photo shows the XB-70A #1 rolling out after landing, employing drag chutes to slow down. In the photo, the outer wing panels are slightly raised. When the XB-70 was flying at high speed, the panel... More

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire wing is indicated by tufts when wing had been modified to incorporate leading-edge slats. Tests showed that it could be flown at speeds as low as 6 knots when out of ground effect (which increases lift). April 1963   published in NASA SP-2002-4525 Memoirs of a Flight test Engineer (Seth Anderson) ARC-1962-A-29657-1

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire...

Ryan VZ-3RY over Ames in slow-speed flight. Smooth airflow over entire wing is indicated by tufts when wing had been modified to incorporate leading-edge slats. Tests showed that it could be flown at speeds as ... More

N-222; 2 x 2ft Transonic Wind Tunnel is a closed return, variable-density tunnel equipped with an adjustable flexible-wall nozzle and a slotted test section.  Airflow is produced by a two-stage, axial-flow compressor powered by four, variable-speed induction motors mounted in tandem, delivering a total of 4,000 horsepower.  For conventional, steady-state testing models are generally supported on a sting. Internal, strain-gage balances are used for measuring forces and moments.  This facility is also used for panel-flutter testing (one test-section wall is replaced with another containing the test specimen. ARC-1965-A-35705

N-222; 2 x 2ft Transonic Wind Tunnel is a closed return, variable-dens...

N-222; 2 x 2ft Transonic Wind Tunnel is a closed return, variable-density tunnel equipped with an adjustable flexible-wall nozzle and a slotted test section. Airflow is produced by a two-stage, axial-flow comp... More

XB-70A #1 liftoff with TB-58A chase aircraft

XB-70A #1 liftoff with TB-58A chase aircraft

Description: This photo shows XB-70A #1 taking off on a research flight, escorted by a TB-58 chase plane. The TB-58 (a prototype B-58 modified as a trainer) had a dash speed of Mach 2. This allowed it to stay c... More

CAPT. Bill Tuck Jr., left, and Frank Keeny, ARO project engineer, examine a B-1 bomber model undergoing transonic wind tunnel testing at the Arnold Engineering Development Center. The tests are being conducted to examine the ability of various fairings to improve the quality of the airflow over the aircraft`s wing where it joins the fuselage

CAPT. Bill Tuck Jr., left, and Frank Keeny, ARO project engineer, exam...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Arnold Air Force Station State: Tennessee (TN) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Phil Tarver Release Status: Releas... More

The air-conditioning trainer was developed and built by the Boeing Company for maintenance training on the environmental control system of the E-3A Sentry aircraft. Controls and indications are actual aircraft components. Airflow through the air-conditioning and pressurization systems is simulated by lighted displays

The air-conditioning trainer was developed and built by the Boeing Com...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Tinker Air Force Base State: Oklahoma (OK) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Pu... More

ENGINE AIRFLOW  SCHEMATIC FIGURE 1-41

ENGINE AIRFLOW SCHEMATIC FIGURE 1-41

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 2/5/1980 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

Dr. Wladimiro Calarese (right), aerospace engineer, and Dr. Wilbur Hankey (left), head of the Computational Aerodynamics Group at the Aeronautical Systems Division's Flight Dynamics Laboratory, are pictured with a recently developed 3-D rotating hologram. The illuminated image in the center of the device is an aircraft turret with arrows pointing out the direction of airflow. The 3-D hologram will allow engineers to better study airflow around various aircraft

Dr. Wladimiro Calarese (right), aerospace engineer, and Dr. Wilbur Han...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Country: Unknown Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released to Public Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

The Aeropropulsion test cell C-2 shown open with an engine simulator installed. The cell is 28 feet in diameter, 85 feet long, and is designed to accommodate full-scale engines mounted in portions of the airframe that would affect airflow during the flight

The Aeropropulsion test cell C-2 shown open with an engine simulator i...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Arnold Air Force Station State: Tennessee (TN) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: Unknown Release Status: Released t... More

LT. COL. (Dr.) Mary Daly, chief of hematology and oncology at Wilford Hall U.S. AIr Force Medical Center, stands in a laminar airflow room in the bone marrow transplant unit. LT. COL. Daly is wearing a sterile cap, gown , mask, gloves and booties in preparation for examining patients in this room

LT. COL. (Dr.) Mary Daly, chief of hematology and oncology at Wilford ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Lackland Air Force Base State: Texas (TX) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: CHIEF MASTER SGT. Don Sutherland Releas... More

LT. COL. Greg Smith (left), mission commander for the airflow and Captain David S. Argyle, deputy mission commander, both from the 438th Airlift Wing, McGuire AFB, NJ, look over the fuel planning documents for the mission

LT. COL. Greg Smith (left), mission commander for the airflow and Capt...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: UGANDA AIRLIFT Base: Rhein-Main Air Base Country: Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Theodore J. Koniare... More

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, seen here is the single stage, 20 blade axial-flow fan powered by a 15,000 horsepower variable speed, synchronous electric motor that provides airflow in the closed-return, variable-density tunnel. ARC-1995-AC95-0203-50

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, ...

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, seen here is the single stage, 20 blade axial-flow fan powered by a 15,000 horsepower variable speed, synchronous electric motor that provid... More

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, seen here is the single stage, 20 blade axial-flow fan powered by a 15,000 horsepower variable speed, synchronous electric motor that provides airflow in the closed-return, variable-density tunnel. ARC-1995-AC95-0203-51

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, ...

New renovated NASA Ames Research Center 12 foot Pressure Wind Tunnel, seen here is the single stage, 20 blade axial-flow fan powered by a 15,000 horsepower variable speed, synchronous electric motor that provid... More

Shot of a UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter which just landed at Task Force Eagle, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, during Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR. Turbulence from the aircraft rotor has blown dry cut grass which has gotten stuck on appendages on the fuselage and drawn into the engine intake ducts. Grasses in the intakes are then caught in a rotating duct that uses centrifugal force to pull debris from the airflow and eject it out a side port

Shot of a UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter which just landed at Task Force ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: JOINT ENDEAVOR Base: Tuzla Country: Bosnia And/I Herzegovina (BIH) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Lance Cheung, USAF Release St... More

AIRMAN First Class Carla Percy, a TALC operator for the 621st Air Mobility Control Squadron (AMCS), McGuire Air Force Base, looks on as Captain John Groff, the Tanker Airlift Control (TALC) OPS officer, fills out airflow plans while deployed at the Libreville International Airport, Gabon, prior to Operation PHOENIX GAUNTLET. PHOENIX GAUNTLET deployed enabling forces as part of contingency planning to prepare for a possible evacuation of Americans from Zaire, gripped in a civil war

AIRMAN First Class Carla Percy, a TALC operator for the 621st Air Mobi...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: PHOENIX GAUNTLET Base: Libreville International Airport Country: Gabon (GAB) Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Andy Dunaway, USAF ... More

"Barnacle Bill" and Surrounding from Super-Pan

"Barnacle Bill" and Surrounding from Super-Pan

This is an image from the super-pan sequence. Of importance are some of the features around the rock nicknamed Barnacle Bill in the left foreground. The rock shows a "streamlined tail" composed of particles dep... More

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Susan Grainger and AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Brian Johnson, both Command and Control Craftsmen assigned to the 821st Tanker Airlift Control Element (TALCE), McGuire Air Force Base (AFB), New Jersey, update aircraft airflow schedules from inside the Mobile Air Reporting and Communications (MARC) shelter at the Kuwait City International Airport (KCIA), in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH 1998

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Susan Grainger and AIRMA...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: SOUTHERN WATCH 1998 Base: Kuwait International Airport Country: Kuwait (KWT) Scene Major Command Shown: AMC Scene Camera Ope... More

Command and Control personnel assigned to the 821st Tanker Airlift Control Element (TALCE), McGuire Air Force Base (AFB), New Jersey, coordinate airflow schedules from the Mobile Air Reporting and Communications (MARC) shelter at the Kuwait City International Airport (KCIA), in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH 1998. Night scope image

Command and Control personnel assigned to the 821st Tanker Airlift Con...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: SOUTHERN WATCH 1998 Base: Kuwait International Airport Country: Kuwait (KWT) Scene Major Command Shown: AMC Scene Camera Ope... More

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Susan Grainger, a Command and Control Craftsman assigned to the 821st Tanker Airlift Control Element (TALCE), McGuire Air Force Base (AFB), New Jersey, updates aircraft airflow schedules from inside the Mobile Air Reporting and Communications (MARC) shelter at the Kuwait City International Airport (KCIA), in support of Operation SOUTHERN WATCH 1998

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Susan Grainger, a Comman...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: SOUTHERN WATCH 1998 Base: Kuwait International Airport Country: Kuwait (KWT) Scene Major Command Shown: AMC Scene Camera Ope... More

SENIOR AIRMAN Elizabeth Hand an Air Traffic Controller with the 48th Operations Support Squadron, 48th Fighter Wing, United Kingdom works in the RAPCON (Radar Approach Control) in the RAF Lakenheath Base Operations building. Part of Hand's duties is to provide expeditious airflow for aircraft flying over both RAF Lakenheath and Mildenhall airspace

SENIOR AIRMAN Elizabeth Hand an Air Traffic Controller with the 48th O...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Raf Lakenheath State: East Anglia Country: England / Great Britain (ENG) Scene Major Command Shown: 48th Fighter Wing, USAFE Scene Camera Operat... More

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN (AMN) Misty Collinson, Readiness Apprentice, 321st Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron (ECES), tests the airflow on a M8A1 automatic chemical agent alarm, a nerve agent detector, at a forward-deployed location during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN (AMN) Misty Collinson, Readiness Apprentice...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: IRAQI FREEDOM Country: Unknown Scene Major Command Shown: CENTCOM Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Tony R. Tolley, USAF Release S... More

A B-2 Spirit bomber Crew CHIEF, US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Ricardo Avila, disconnects a hose from an airflow cart at Nellis Air Force Base (AFB), Nevada (NV)

A B-2 Spirit bomber Crew CHIEF, US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Nellis Air Force Base State: Nevada (NV) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Major Command Shown: ACC Scene Camera Operator: MSGT Mich... More

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-021

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-002

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-022

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-003

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-023

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-ACD04-0002-001

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21) ARC-2004-AC...

CVN78 CARRIER AIRFLOW STUDY IN FLUID MECHANICS LAB (CVN21)

US Air Force (USAF) STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Julianna Butler, Air Traffic Controller (ATC), 332nd Expeditionary Air Control Squadron (EACS), in communication with aircraft from the control tower at Balad Air Base (AB), Iraq, helping control airflow coming in an out of the base during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Julianna Butler, Air Traffic...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Subject Operation/Series: IRAQI FREEDOM Base: Balad Air Base Country: Iraq (IRQ) Scene Major Command Shown: N/A Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Ricky A. B... More

A forest of tufts are mounted on the underbelly and pylon of NASA's Gulfstream-III research aircraft to help engineers determine airflow around the UAVSAR pod. ED07-0027-01

A forest of tufts are mounted on the underbelly and pylon of NASA's Gu...

A forest of tufts are mounted on the underbelly and pylon of NASA's Gulfstream-III research aircraft to help engineers determine airflow around the UAVSAR pod.

Sailors check the voltage on an airflow monitor in the alarm and warning shop aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

Sailors check the voltage on an airflow monitor in the alarm and warni...

PACIFIC OCEAN (Mar. 23, 2009) Interior Communications Electrician 3rd Class Zachary Bonds, left, from Phoenix City, Ala., left, Interior Communications Electrician Fireman Jeremy Audas, from Midland, Texas, and... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The engines of U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft are started in preparation for takeoff from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy Space Center for landing following the STS-119 mission. Onboard instruments will check the orbiter’s exterior temperatures and a long-range infrared camera will remotely monitor heating to the shuttle’s lower surface, part of the boundary layer transition flight experiment. For the experiment, a heat shield tile with a “speed bump” on it was installed under Discovery’s left wing to intentionally disturb the airflow in a controlled manner and make the airflow turbulent. The tile, a BRI-18, was originally developed as a potential heat shield upgrade on the orbiters and is being considered for use on the Constellation Program’s Orion crew exploration vehicles. The data will determine if a protuberance on a BRI-18 tile is safe to fly and will be used to verify and improve design efforts for future spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2349

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The engines of U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft a...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The engines of U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft are started in preparation for takeoff from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discov... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft taxies to the runway of the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in preparation for takeoff. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy Space Center for landing following the STS-119 mission. Onboard instruments will check the orbiter’s exterior temperatures and a long-range infrared camera will remotely monitor heating to the shuttle’s lower surface, part of the boundary layer transition flight experiment. For the experiment, a heat shield tile with a “speed bump” on it was installed under Discovery’s left wing to intentionally disturb the airflow in a controlled manner and make the airflow turbulent. The tile, a BRI-18, was originally developed as a potential heat shield upgrade on the orbiters and is being considered for use on the Constellation Program’s Orion crew exploration vehicles. The data will determine if a protuberance on a BRI-18 tile is safe to fly and will be used to verify and improve design efforts for future spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2350

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft taxies to the ...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft taxies to the runway of the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in preparation for takeoff. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft takes off from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy Space Center for landing following the STS-119 mission. Onboard instruments will check the orbiter’s exterior temperatures and a long-range infrared camera will remotely monitor heating to the shuttle’s lower surface, part of the boundary layer transition flight experiment. For the experiment, a heat shield tile with a “speed bump” on it was installed under Discovery’s left wing to intentionally disturb the airflow in a controlled manner and make the airflow turbulent. The tile, a BRI-18, was originally developed as a potential heat shield upgrade on the orbiters and is being considered for use on the Constellation Program’s Orion crew exploration vehicles. The data will determine if a protuberance on a BRI-18 tile is safe to fly and will be used to verify and improve design efforts for future spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2351

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft takes off from...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft takes off from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy Space Center ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. --  A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft prepares for takeoff from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy Space Center for landing following the STS-119 mission. Onboard instruments will check the orbiter’s exterior temperatures and a long-range infrared camera will remotely monitor heating to the shuttle’s lower surface, part of the boundary layer transition flight experiment. For the experiment, a heat shield tile with a “speed bump” on it was installed under Discovery’s left wing to intentionally disturb the airflow in a controlled manner and make the airflow turbulent. The tile, a BRI-18, was originally developed as a potential heat shield upgrade on the orbiters and is being considered for use on the Constellation Program’s Orion crew exploration vehicles. The data will determine if a protuberance on a BRI-18 tile is safe to fly and will be used to verify and improve design efforts for future spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-2348

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft prepares for...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A U.S. Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft prepares for takeoff from the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The plane will fly below space shuttle Discovery as it approaches Kennedy ... More

Supersonic Aircraft Model  The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center shows a 1.79 percent scale model of a future concept supersonic aircraft built by The Boeing Company. In recent tests, researchers evaluated the performance of air inlets mounted on top of the model to see how changing the amount of airflow at supersonic speeds through the inlet affected performance. The inlet on the pilot's right side (top inlet in this side view) is larger because it contains a remote-controlled device through which the flow of air could be changed.  The work is part of ongoing research in NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to address the challenges of making future supersonic flight over land possible. Researchers are testing overall vehicle design and performance options to reduce emissions and noise, and identifying whether the volume of sonic booms can be reduced to a level that leads to a reversal of the current ruling that prohibits commercial supersonic flight over land.  Image Credit: NASA/Quentin Schwinn GRC-2013-C-01168

Supersonic Aircraft Model The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-f...

Supersonic Aircraft Model The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center shows a 1.79 percent scale model of a future concept supersonic aircraft built by... More

Supersonic Aircraft Model  The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center shows a 1.79 percent scale model of a future concept supersonic aircraft built by The Boeing Company. In recent tests, researchers evaluated the performance of air inlets mounted on top of the model to see how changing the amount of airflow at supersonic speeds through the inlet affected performance. The inlet on the pilot's right side (top inlet in this side view) is larger because it contains a remote-controlled device through which the flow of air could be changed.  The work is part of ongoing research in NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to address the challenges of making future supersonic flight over land possible. Researchers are testing overall vehicle design and performance options to reduce emissions and noise, and identifying whether the volume of sonic booms can be reduced to a level that leads to a reversal of the current ruling that prohibits commercial supersonic flight over land.  Image Credit: NASA/Quentin Schwinn GRC-2013-C-01177

Supersonic Aircraft Model The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-f...

Supersonic Aircraft Model The window in the sidewall of the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center shows a 1.79 percent scale model of a future concept supersonic aircraft built by... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane moves the first of four Ogive panels closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4248

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane moves the first of four Ogive panels closer for installation... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by crane for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4246

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by cra...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by crane for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The pa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by crane for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4247

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by cra...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The first of four Ogive panels is lifted by crane for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The pa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Installation of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System continues inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4249

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Installation of four Ogive panels on Orion's La...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Installation of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System continues inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the ai... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms continue the installation of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4250

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms continue the inst...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms continue the installation of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Flori... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have installed two of the four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Daniel Casper KSC-2014-4251

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians have installed two of the four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians attach the third of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4258

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians attach the third of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a window cover has been carefully removed from the Orion spacecraft before the fourth and final Ogive panel is installed around the spacecraft and Launch Abort System. The Ogive panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4400

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a window cover has been carefully removed from the Orion spacecraft before the fourth and final Ogive pa... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician on a work platform carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is installed around the spacecraft and Launch Abort System. The Ogive panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4398

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician on a work platform carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane brings the fourth and final Ogive panel closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Kim Shiflett KSC-2014-4259

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane brings the fourth and final Ogive panel closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System. ... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are underway to remove the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is installed around the spacecraft and Launch Abort System. The Ogive panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4397

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are underway to remove the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel i... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is installed around the spacecraft and Launch Abort System. The Ogive panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4399

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician carefully removes the window covers on Orion before the fourth and final Ogive panel is ins... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms monitor the progress as a crane brings the third of four Ogive panels closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4256

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms monitor the progr...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians on work platforms monitor the progress as a crane brings the third of four Ogive panels closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System inside the Launch Abort System F... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane brings the third of four Ogive panels closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4255

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane brings the third of four Ogive panels closer for installation on Orion's Launch Abort System. Th... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians attach the third of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The work marked the final major assembly steps for the spacecraft before it is transported to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in November.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Ben Smegelsky KSC-2014-4257

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians attach the third of four Ogive panels on Orion's Launch Abort System. The panels will smooth... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4379

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4383

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4382

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4385

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4381

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4380

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panels will smooth the airflow over the conical spacecraft to limit sound and vibration, which will make for a much smoother ride for the astronauts who will ride inside Orion in the future. The spacecraft is being readied for its move to Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for its flight test.    Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. The first unpiloted flight test of Orion is scheduled to launch in December 2014 atop a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket, and in 2018 on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: Jim Grossman KSC-2014-4384

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abo...

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Orion spacecraft sits inside the Launch Abort System Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Ogive panels have been installed around the launch abort system. The panel... More

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects, and

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects, and

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects, and Jake Ferry, deputy director of plans and programs, field operations and training for the University of Nebraska’s National Strategic Research Institute colle... More

A fleet of various U.S. Air Force airframes find their

A fleet of various U.S. Air Force airframes find their

A fleet of various U.S. Air Force airframes find their landing spot together for the first time in history on a ramp at the Nebraska National Guard air base, April 4-11, 2020, in Lincoln, Nebraska. The fleet co... More

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist,

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist,

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist, tests fog particles dispersed throughout a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft at the 155th Air Refueling Wing, Nebraska National Guard air base, Nebraska, A... More

A C-5 Galaxy military transport aircraft from Dover

A C-5 Galaxy military transport aircraft from Dover

A C-5 Galaxy military transport aircraft from Dover Air Force Base lands, April 9, 2020, at the Nebraska National Guard air base in Lincoln, Nebraska. The U.S. Air Force’s Air Mobility Command, in coordination ... More

Surface samples are collected during KC-135 Stratotanker

Surface samples are collected during KC-135 Stratotanker

Surface samples are collected during KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft airflow testing at the 155th Air Refueling Wing, Nebraska National Guard air base, Nebraska, April 7, 2020. The U.S. Air Force’s Air Mobility Co... More

625: Blake Silcott, bio defense project manager with

625: Blake Silcott, bio defense project manager with

625: Blake Silcott, bio defense project manager with S3I, performs real-time analysis of particles, April 7, 2020, to see how they moved and flowed through a C-130 military transport aircraft located at the Neb... More

Dillion Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillion Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillion Cunningham, director of special projects for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, collects a surface sample for particle disposition, April 6, 2020, from inside a C-1... More

A research team poses for a photo on a C-130 Hercules

A research team poses for a photo on a C-130 Hercules

A research team poses for a photo on a C-130 Hercules ramp during aircraft airflow testing at the 155th Air Refueling Wing, Nebraska National Guard air base, Nebraska, April 8, 2020. The U.S. Air Force’s Air Mo... More

David Silcott, S3I chief executive officer, runs an

David Silcott, S3I chief executive officer, runs an

David Silcott, S3I chief executive officer, runs an airflow test on a KC-46 Pegasus at the 155th Air Refueling Wing, Nebraska National Guard air base, Nebraska, April 10, 2020. The U.S. Air Force’s Air Mobilit... More

Members from the University of Nebraska’s National

Members from the University of Nebraska’s National

Members from the University of Nebraska’s National Strategic Research Institute, KC-46 Pegasus crew members and 155th Air Refueling Wing Airmen, discuss airflow particle test results at the 155th ARW, Nebraska ... More

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist,

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist,

Brett Edwards, Universal Energy Systems research scientist, and Daniel Reilly, UES mechanical research engineer, take air samples to track airflow within a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft at the 155th Air Refuelin... More

Blake Silcott, S3I bio defense project manager, secures

Blake Silcott, S3I bio defense project manager, secures

Blake Silcott, S3I bio defense project manager, secures a particle testing machine to a C-5 Galaxy aircraft before running airflow tests at the 155th Air Refueling Wing, Nebraska National Guard air base, Nebras... More

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist for the National

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist for the National

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, watches the fluorescent tracer particles in real-time on a computer after they were released by... More

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, collects a surface sample for particle disposition, April 6, 2020, from inside a C-17... More

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, collects a surface sample for particle disposition, April 6, 2020, from inside a C-17... More

David Silcott, chief executive officer for S3I, places

David Silcott, chief executive officer for S3I, places

David Silcott, chief executive officer for S3I, places fluorescent tracer particles into a nebulizer that is being aerosolized into the a KC-46 military transport aircraft, April 10, 2020, and traced using an I... More

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for

Dillan Cunningham, director of special projects for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, watches the fluorescent tracer particles in real-time on a computer after they were r... More

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist, aerosol and

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist, aerosol and

Sean Kinahan, senior threat scientist, aerosol and sampling expertise for the National Strategic Research Institute at the University of Nebraska, discusses particle airflow testing and the dynamics of the proc... More