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GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTER (ATDA) - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9A - LIFTOFF - ATLAS/AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTE...

S66-32139 (1 June 1966) --- An Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) atop an Atlas launch vehicle is launched from Kennedy Space Center's Pad 14 at 10 a.m., June 1, 1966. The ATDA is a rendezvous and docking ... More

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 - EARTH-SKY - AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTER (ATDA) - MSC

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 - EARTH-SKY - AUGMENTED TARGET DOCKING ADAPTER (AT...

S66-37923 (3 June 1966) --- The Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) as seen from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during one of their three rendezvous in space. The ATDA and Gemini-9 spacecraft are 66.5 feet apart. ... More

GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - ATDA

GEMINI-9 - EARTH SKY - ATDA

S66-37972 (3 June 1966) ?-- The Augmented Target Docking Adapter (ATDA) is photographed from the Gemini-9 spacecraft during one of three rendezvous occasions in space. The ATDA and Gemini-9 spacecraft are 35.5 ... More

Interior view of KSC's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building

Interior view of KSC's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building

S69-19197 (1969) --- Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) Manned Spacecraft Operations Building (MSOB) showing Apollo Spacecraft 106 Command and Service Modules (CSM) being moved to integrated work... More

Interior view of KSC's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building

Interior view of KSC's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building

S69-19190 (31 Jan. 1969) --- Interior view of the Kennedy Space Center's Manned Spacecraft Operations Building showing Apollo Spacecraft 106/Command/Service Module being moved to integrated work stand number on... More

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 9/28/1976 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 9/28/1976 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 9/28/1976 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

KC 46 VACUUM PUMP AND WHITEY CONOFLOW CONCESSION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 9/28/1976 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/7/1977 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/7/1977 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/7/1977 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/7/1977 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

INSTALLED TEST SECTION AND ADAPTERS

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 12/7/1977 Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

ROTARY ENGINE HOUSING WITH INSTRUMENT PROBE ADAPTERS INSTALLED

ROTARY ENGINE HOUSING WITH INSTRUMENT PROBE ADAPTERS INSTALLED

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 2/21/1979 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

ROTARY ENGINE HOUSING WITH INSTRUMENT PROBE ADAPTERS INSTALLED

ROTARY ENGINE HOUSING WITH INSTRUMENT PROBE ADAPTERS INSTALLED

The original finding aid described this as: Capture Date: 2/21/1979 Photographer: MARTIN BROWN Keywords: Larsen Scan Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

STS106-375-017 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-017 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-030 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-030 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-020 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-020 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-013 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-013 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-032 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-032 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-026 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-026 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-025 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-025 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-033 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-033 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-014 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-014 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-029 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-029 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-031 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-031 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-028 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-028 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-034 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-034 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-018 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-018 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-016 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-016 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-027 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-027 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-021 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-021 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-015 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-015 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-022 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-022 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-035 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-035 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-019 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-019 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

STS106-375-024 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlantis during STS-106 mission

STS106-375-024 - STS-106 - Flyaround views of the ISS taken from Atlan...

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Views of the International Space Station (ISS) taken from Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the final flyaround of the STS-106 mission. The ISS... More

AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Robert A. Mendenhall, an aircraft machinist, manufactures yoke adapters to be used on aircraft weapons pylons

AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Robert A. Mendenhall, an aircraft machinist, ...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Macdill Air Force Base State: Florida (FL) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: AMN Charles Kohlenberg Release Status:... More

M16A2 rifles with blank adapters and M70 scout sniper rifles are stacked along a bench during a field training exercise

M16A2 rifles with blank adapters and M70 scout sniper rifles are stack...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: Quantico State: Virginia (VA) Country: United States Of America (USA) Scene Camera Operator: CPL D.A. Haynes, Usmc Release Status: Released to P... More

An aero 12C bomb skid equipped with two Aero 39B bomb skid adapters for nitrogen bottles stands on the deck of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69). The EISENHOWER is participating in a week of carrier qualifications testing off the Virginia Capes

An aero 12C bomb skid equipped with two Aero 39B bomb skid adapters fo...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69) Country: Atlantic Ocean (AOC) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy E. Didas Release Status: Released to Public Combi... More

Ordnance multiple ejector racks (MER) are stored on Aero 83A transport adapters mounted on Aero 21A weapons skids aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

Ordnance multiple ejector racks (MER) are stored on Aero 83A transport...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69) Country: Mediterranean Sea (MED) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy Lee Didas Release Status: Released to Public C... More

Ordnance multiple ejector racks (MER) are stored on Aero 83A transport adapters mounted on Aero 21A weapons skids aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69)

Ordnance multiple ejector racks (MER) are stored on Aero 83A transport...

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Base: USS Dwight D Eisenhower (CVN 69) Country: Mediterranean Sea (MED) Scene Camera Operator: PH2 Tracy Lee Didas Release Status: Released to Public C... More

S88E5140 - STS-088 - Stowage bag in the entrance to a PMA

S88E5140 - STS-088 - Stowage bag in the entrance to a PMA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Various views of a stowage bag floating in the entrance to one of the Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) during the STS-88 mission. A crewmembers feet an... More

S88E5139 - STS-088 - Stowage bag in the entrance to a PMA

S88E5139 - STS-088 - Stowage bag in the entrance to a PMA

The original finding aid described this as: Description: Various views of a stowage bag floating in the entrance to one of the Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) during the STS-88 mission. Subject Terms: STOWA... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -  Workers in KSC's Vertical Processing Facility stow cable and adapters into a protective enclosure for the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, STS-82.  Liftoff aboard Discovery is targeted Feb. 11 with a crew of seven.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in KSC's Vertical Processing Fac...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in KSC's Vertical Processing Facility stow cable and adapters into a protective enclosure for the second Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission, STS-82. Liftoff aboard D... More

The container transporting the Node 1, the first  element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the  first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, is moved into the Space Station Processing  Facility high bay June 23 after its arrival from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center  (MSFC).  The Node 1 module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle  Endeavour in July 1998 along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The  18-foot in diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co.  at MSFC. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the  living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will  serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock  and other space station elements KSC-97PC924

The container transporting the Node 1, the first element of the Inter...

The container transporting the Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, is moved into the Space S... More

Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, is unloaded in its container from an Air Force C-5 jet cargo transport at  KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility runway on June 23 after its arrival from NASA’s  Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The module was then transported to the Space  Station Processing Facility. The Node 1 module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard  the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998 along with Pressurized Mating Adapters  (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was  manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a  connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station.  It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other Space Station elements KSC-97PC922

Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be ma...

Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, is unloaded in its container from an Air Force C-5 jet c... More

Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, is unloaded in its container from an Air Force C-5 jet cargo transport at  KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility runway on June 23 after its arrival from NASA’s  Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The module was then transported to the Space  Station Processing Facility. The Node 1 module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard  the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998 along with Pressurized Mating Adapters  (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot in diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was  manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a  connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station.  It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other Space Station elements KSC-97PC923

Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be ma...

Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, is unloaded in its container from an Air Force C-5 jet c... More

The Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processing Facility high bay   after its arrival at KSC from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).  The Node 1  module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998  along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot in diameter, 22- foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in  space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working  areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports  to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station  elements KSC-97PC931

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to b...

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processi... More

The Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processing Facility high bay   after its arrival at KSC from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).  The Node 1  module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998  along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot in diameter, 22- foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in  space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working  areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports  to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station  elements KSC-97PC928

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to b...

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processi... More

The Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processing Facility high bay   after its arrival at KSC from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).  The Node 1  module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998  along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot in diameter, 22- foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in  space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working  areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports  to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station  elements KSC-97PC930

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to b...

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processi... More

The Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processing Facility high bay   after its arrival at KSC from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).  The Node 1  module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998  along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22- foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in  space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working  areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports  to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station  elements KSC-97PC927

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to b...

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processi... More

The Node 1, the first element of the International  Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the  Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processing Facility high bay   after its arrival at KSC from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).  The Node 1  module is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998  along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot in diameter, 22- foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at MSFC. Once in  space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working  areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports  to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station  elements KSC-97PC929

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to b...

The Node 1, the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first to be launched on the Space Shuttle, rests in its container in the Space Station Processi... More

A close-up view of the  Node 1 in its work stand  in the Space Station Processing Facility shows two of its six hatches that will serve as  docking ports. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six  hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC941

A close-up view of the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station...

A close-up view of the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility shows two of its six hatches that will serve as docking ports. The module is the first element of the International Sp... More

A close-up view of the  Node 1 in its work stand  in the Space Station Processing Facility shows one of its six hatches that will serve as  docking ports. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six  hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC940

A close-up view of the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station...

A close-up view of the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility shows one of its six hatches that will serve as docking ports. The module is the first element of the International Sp... More

Covered in a protective sheath, International  Space Station  Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station  Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to  be manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six  hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation  module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC933

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 i...

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International... More

Covered in a protective sheath, International  Space Station  Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station  Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to  be manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six  hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation  module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC932

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 i...

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International... More

KSC workers begin to remove a protective  sheath from the Node 1  in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The  module is the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactured in the  United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The Node 1  is  currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998, along  with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot- long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at  Marshall Space Flight  Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living  and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as  docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other  space station elements KSC-97PC938

KSC workers begin to remove a protective sheath from the Node 1 in i...

KSC workers begin to remove a protective sheath from the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be manufactur... More

Covered in a protective sheath, International  Space Station  Node 1 is hoisted from its transporting container for installation in its work  stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the  International Space Station to be manufactured in the United States and the first  scheduled to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift  off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating  Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was  manufactured by the Boeing Co. at  Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the  Node 1 will function as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the  International Space Station. It has six hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S.  laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC935

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 i...

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 is hoisted from its transporting container for installation in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the fi... More

Covered in a protective sheath, International  Space Station  Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station  Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to  be manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six  hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation  module, an airlock and other space station KSC-97PC936

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 i...

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 is hoisted for installation in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International... More

A KSC payloads processing employee removes   a protective sheath part of the  Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station Processing  Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six  hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation  module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC939

A KSC payloads processing employee removes a protective sheath part ...

A KSC payloads processing employee removes a protective sheath part of the Node 1 in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Stati... More

Covered in a protective sheath, International  Space Station  Node 1 is installed in its work stand in the Space Station Processing  Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1  is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. It has six  hatches that will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation  module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC934

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 i...

Covered in a protective sheath, International Space Station Node 1 is installed in its work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station ... More

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the International Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the ISS to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS. The six hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S. habitation module, an airlock and other Space Station elements KSC-97PC942

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the International Spa...

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the International Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the U... More

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six  hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC943

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space...

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be ... More

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six  hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC945

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space...

Members of the STS-88 crew examine the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be ... More

Members of the STS-88 crew pose with the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to be  manufactured in the United States and the first scheduled to be launched on the Space  Shuttle. The Node 1 is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour  in July 1998, along with Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) 1 and 2. The 18-foot-in-diameter, 22-foot-long aluminum module was manufactured by the Boeing Co. at   Marshall Space Flight Center. Once in space, the Node 1 will function as a connecting  passageway to the living and working areas of the International Space Station. The six  hatches on the Node 1 will serve as docking ports to the U.S. laboratory module, U.S.  habitation module, an airlock and other space station elements KSC-97PC944

Members of the STS-88 crew pose with the Node 1 of the Internation Spa...

Members of the STS-88 crew pose with the Node 1 of the Internation Space Station in the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility. The module is the first element of the International Space Station to b... More

International Space Station (ISS) contractors  erect access scaffolding around the Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1) for the ISS in  KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be  attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground  processing. The white flight cables around PMA-1 will assist in connecting the node to  the U.S.-financed, Russian-built Functional Cargo Block, a component that supplies early  power and propulsion systems for the station. Node 1 with two adapters attached will be  the first element of the station to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on  STS-88 in July 1998 KSC-97PC1137

International Space Station (ISS) contractors erect access scaffoldin...

International Space Station (ISS) contractors erect access scaffolding around the Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1) for the ISS in KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector ... More

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or  PMAs, for the International Space Station arrive in KSC’s Space Station Processing  Facility in July. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the  space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. The adapter will  house space station computers and various electrical support equipment and eventually  will serve as the passageway for astronauts between the node and the U.S-financed,  Russian-built Functional Cargo Block. Node 1 with two adapters attached will be the first  element of the station to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in  July 1998 KSC-97PC1140

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or PMAs, for the Intern...

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or PMAs, for the International Space Station arrive in KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility in July. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to ... More

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or  PMAs, for the International Space Station arrive in KSC’s Space Station Processing  Facility in July. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to Node 1, the  space station’s structural building block, during ground processing. The adapter will  house space station computers and various electrical support equipment and eventually  will serve as the passageway for astronauts between the node and the U.S-financed,  Russian-built Functional Cargo Block. Node 1 with two adapters attached will be the first  element of the station to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 in  July 1998 KSC-97PC1139

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or PMAs, for the Intern...

The first of two Pressurized Mating Adapters, or PMAs, for the International Space Station arrive in KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility in July. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be attached to ... More

International Space Station (ISS) contractors  erect access scaffolding around the Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1) for the ISS in  KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector that will be  attached to Node 1, the space station’s structural building block, during ground  processing. The white flight cables around PMA-1 will assist in connecting the node to  the U.S.-financed, Russian-built Functional Cargo Block, a component that supplies early  power and propulsion systems for the station. Node 1 with two adapters attached will be  the first element of the station to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on  STS-88 in July 1998 KSC-97PC1138

International Space Station (ISS) contractors erect access scaffoldin...

International Space Station (ISS) contractors erect access scaffolding around the Pressurized Mating Adapter-1 (PMA-1) for the ISS in KSC’s Space Station Processing Facility. A PMA is a cone-shaped connector ... More

Workers rotate the Node 1, part of the primary payload of the first Space Shuttle launch of an International Space Station (ISS) element, during processing activities in the Space Station Processing Facility. Along with two Pressurized Mating Adapters, Node 1 is scheduled to be launched aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in July 1998. The 22-foot-long module has a diameter of 18 feet. Node 1 will serve as a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the ISS KSC-97PC1270

Workers rotate the Node 1, part of the primary payload of the first Sp...

Workers rotate the Node 1, part of the primary payload of the first Space Shuttle launch of an International Space Station (ISS) element, during processing activities in the Space Station Processing Facility. A... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc645

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing by Boeing technicians in its workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc646

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing by Boeing technicians in its workstand in the Space ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Unity node is the first element of the ISS to be manufactured in the United States and is currently scheduled to lift off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-88 later this year. Unity has two PMAs attached to it now that this mate is completed. PMAs are conical docking adapters which will allow the docking systems used by the Space Shuttle and by Russian modules to attach to the node's hatches and berthing mechanisms. Once in orbit, Unity, which has six hatches, will be mated with the already orbiting Control Module and will eventually provide attachment points for the U.S. laboratory module; Node 3; an early exterior framework or truss for the station; an airlock; and a multi-windowed cupola. The Control Module, or Functional Cargo Block, is a U.S.-funded and Russian-built component that will be launched aboard a Russian rocket from Kazakstan KSC-98pc644

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The International Space Station's (ISS) Unity node, with Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 attached, awaits further processing in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The... More

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbiter landings at the Kennedy Space Center are made on one of the largest runways in the world. The runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest of the Vehicle Assembly Building and is 4,572 meters (15,000ft) long and 91.4 meters (300ft) wide -- about as wide as the length of a football field. It has 305 meters (1000ft) of paved overruns at each end and the paving thickness is 40.6cm (15 inches) at the center. At left in the photo is the Aircraft Ground Equipment Shed; in the center is the Landing Aids Control Building (LACB) which supports landing operations and houses operations personnel. Located at the northeast corner of the parking apron is the Mate/Demate device (MDD) used to raise and lower the orbiter from its 747 carrier aircraft during ferry operations. The open-truss steel structure is equipped with hoists, adapters and movable platforms for access to certain orbiter components and equipment. It also is equipped with lightning protection devices. The MDD is 45.7 meters (150ft) long, 28.3 meters (93ft) wide and 32 meters (105ft) high. On the landing area in front of the SLF is a T-38 jet airplane. KSC-98PC-1040

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbite...

From the air over KSC can be seen the Shuttle Landing Facility. Orbiter landings at the Kennedy Space Center are made on one of the largest runways in the world. The runway is located 3.2 km (2 miles) northwest... More

STS088-S-001 (September 1998) --- Designed by the crew members, this STS-88 patch commemorates the first assembly flight to carry United States-built hardware for constructing the International Space Station (ISS). This flight's primary task is to assemble the cornerstone of the space station: the Node with the Functional Cargo Block (FGB). The rising sun symbolizes the dawning of a new era of international cooperation in space and the beginning of a new program: the International Space Station. The Earth scene outlines the countries of the Station Partners: the United States, Russia, those of the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan, and Canada. Along with the Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMA) and the Functional Cargo Block, the Node is shown in the final mated configuration while berthed to the space shuttle during the STS-88/2A mission. The Big Dipper Constellation points the way to the North Star, a guiding light for pioneers and explorers for generations. In the words of the crew, "These stars symbolize the efforts of everyone, including all the countries involved in the design and construction of the International Space Station, guiding us into the future."    The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA sts088-s-001

STS088-S-001 (September 1998) --- Designed by the crew members, this S...

STS088-S-001 (September 1998) --- Designed by the crew members, this STS-88 patch commemorates the first assembly flight to carry United States-built hardware for constructing the International Space Station (I... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour, workers and STS-88 crew members on a movable work platform or bucket move closer to the rear of the orbiter's crew compartment. While Endeavour is being prepared for flight inside Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, the STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. A KSC worker (left) maneuvers the platform to give Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman (right) a closer look. Looking on is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour, workers and STS-88 crew members on a movable work platform or bucket move closer to the rear of the orbiter's crew compar... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow makes a visual inspection of windows on the Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for launch on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1226

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Pilot Frederick W. Sturckow makes a visual inspection of windows on the Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour. The STS-88 crew members ar... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists (left to right) Jerry L. Ross; Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; and James H. Newman examine equipment that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their upcoming flight. Launch of Mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Other crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1213

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists (left to right) Jerry L. Ross; Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; and James H. Newman examine equipment ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (left) and James H. Newman (right foreground) get a close look at the Orbiter Docking System. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. While on orbit during STS-88, Unity will be latched atop the Orbiter Docking System in the forward section of Endeavour's payload bay for the mating of the two modules. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1218

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeav...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (left) and James H. Newman (right foreground) get a c... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a Russian cosmonaut; James H. Newman (center); and Jerry L. Ross conduct a sharp-edge inspection of the Unity connecting module, which is the primary payload on their upcoming mission. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1223

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a Russian cosmonaut; James H. Newman (center); and Jerry L. Ross conduct a sharp-edge i... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbox that will be on the Space Shuttle Endeavour during their flight. Talking to Ross is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, while Henry Thacker (facing camera), of Flight Crew Systems at KSC, looks on. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1215

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clad in their blue flight suits, STS-88 Mission Specialists (from left) Sergei Krikalev, a cosmonaut from Russia; Jerry L. Ross; and James H. Newman examine equipment from a toolbo... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Jerry L. Ross check out equipment on the Unity connecting module, primary payload on the mission. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Scheduled for launch on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. The Unity connecting module will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, already on orbit after a November launch. Unity will have two Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) attached and 1 stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 will connect U.S. and Russian elements; PMA-2 will provide a Shuttle docking location. Eventually, Unity's six ports will provide connecting points for the Z1 truss exterior framework, U.S. lab, airlock, cupola, Node 3, and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, as well as the control module. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power through the early assembly stages. It provides fuel storage capability and a rendezvous and docking capability to the Service Module KSC-98pc1224

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Jerry L. Ross check out equipment on the Unity connecting module, pri... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bucket inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (far right) and James H. Newman (second from right) get a close look at the Orbiter Docking System. At left is the bucket operator and Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. The STS-88 crew members are in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1 to participate in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. While on orbit during STS-88, Unity will be latched atop the Orbiter Docking System in the forward section of Endeavour's payload bay for the mating of the two modules. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1219

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bu...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Lowered on a movable work platform or bucket inside the payload bay of orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (far right) and James H. Newman (second from righ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a Russian cosmonaut; and James H. Newman look over equipment for their upcoming flight. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1221

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility B...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a Russian cosmonaut; and James H. Newman look over equipment for their upcoming fli... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, workers James Neilhouse (left) and Melissa Groening (right) watch while STS-88 Mission Specialists James H. Newman (second from left) and Sergei Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, check overhead equipment. STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability. KSC-98pc1220

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour i...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, workers James Neilhouse (left) and Melissa Groening (right) watch while STS-88 Mission Specialists ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a cosmonaut from Russia; and Jerry L. Ross examine equipment that will be aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. Launch of mission STS-88 is targeted for Dec. 3, 1998. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Other crew members are Commander Robert D. Cabana, Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow and Mission Specialists Nancy J. Currie and James H. Newman. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1214

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Sergei Krikalev (left), a cosmonaut from Russia; and Jerry L. Ross examine equipment that will be aboard Space ... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana watches from inside Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour as worker Tracey Hackett cleans the outside of a window. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1227

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana watches from inside Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour as worker Tracey Hackett cleans the outside of a win... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana makes a visual inspection of the windows on Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1225

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Commander Robert D. Cabana makes a visual inspection of the windows on Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour. The STS-88 crew members are... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (crouching at left) and James H. Newman (far right) get a close look at equipment. Looking on is Wayne Wedlake (far left), with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center, and a KSC worker (behind Newman) who is operating the movable work platform or bucket. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1217

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle ...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour in Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (crouching at left) and James H. Newman (fa... More

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers them into the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (second from left) and James H. Newman (second from right) do a sharp-edge inspection. At their right is Wayne Wedlake, with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Below them is the Orbiter Docking System, the remote manipulator system arm and a tunnel into the payload bay. The STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), familiarizing themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1222

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers the...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- As the bucket operator (left) lowers them into the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour, STS-88 Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross (second from left) and James H. Newman (secon... More

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is shown with Pressurized Mating Adapters 1 (left) and 2 (right) attached. Unity is scheduled to undergo testing of the common berthing mechanism to which other space station elements will dock. Unity is the primary payload on mission STS-88, targeted to launch Dec. 3, 1998. Other testing includes the Pad Demonstration Test to verify the compatibility of the module with the Space Shuttle as well as the ability of the astronauts to send and receive commands to Unity from the flight deck of the orbiter. Unity is expected to be ready for installation into the payload canister on Oct. 25, and transported to Launch Pad 39-A on Oct. 27. The Unity will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module which should already be in orbit at that time KSC-98pc1247

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module,...

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, is shown with Pressurized Mating Adapters 1 (left) and 2 (right) attached. Unity is scheduled to u... More