PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

Topic: abundance

1375
1375
slider-holder
2016
slider-holder
2016
553 media by topicpage 1 of 6
Allegory of Abundance

Allegory of Abundance

Anonymous, French, 17th century

[The great abundance of fish and game in Virginia; man hunting with muskets and falcons, and fishing]

[The great abundance of fish and game in Virginia; man hunting with mu...

Illus. in: DeBry, Americae XI. Reference copy may be in LOT 4433. This record contains unverified, old data from caption card, with subsequent revisions. Caption card tracings: Shelf.

Female Personification of Summer or Abundance

Female Personification of Summer or Abundance

Sebastián de Herrera-Barnuevo (Spanish, Madrid 1619–1671 Madrid)

Allegorical Figure of Abundance

Allegorical Figure of Abundance

Anonymous, Italian, first half of the 18th century

Study of a Woman (Etude de femme / Abundance)

Study of a Woman (Etude de femme / Abundance)

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes (French, Lyons 1824–1898 Paris)

"Abundance" Textile

"Abundance" Textile

André Mare (French, Argentan 1887–1932 Paris)

Mothers, Give from your Abundance (Mütter gebt von eurem Überfluss)

Mothers, Give from your Abundance (Mütter gebt von eurem Überfluss)

Käthe Kollwitz (German, Kaliningrad (Königsberg) 1867–1945 Moritzburg)

Range :  34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 photograph of Saturn was taken on the last day it could be captured within a single narrow angle camera frame as the spacecraft neared the planet for it's closest approach on Nov. 12, 1980. Dione, one of Saturn's innermost satellites, appears as three color spots just below  the planet's south pole. An abundance of previously unseen detail is apparent in the rings. For example, a gap in the dark, innermst ring, C-ring or Crepe Ring, is clearly shown. Also, material is seen inside the relatively wide Cassini Division, seperating  the middle, B-ring from the outermost ring, the A-ring. The Encke division is shown near the outer edge of A-ring. The detail in the ring's shadows cast on the planet is of particular interest. The broad dark band near the equator is the shadow of B-ring. The thinner, brighter line just to the south is the shadow  of the less dense A-ring. ARC-1980-AC80-7003

Range : 34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 ...

Range : 34 million km. ( 21.1 million miles) P-22993C This Voyager 1 photograph of Saturn was taken on the last day it could be captured within a single narrow angle camera frame as the spacecraft neared the p... more

Ashley River Road - An Abundance of Camellias

Ashley River Road - An Abundance of Camellias

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Original Caption: Camellias fill the garden paths of Middleton Place, whether still blooming on the bushes or carpeting the paths with petals. Location: ... more

Grand Mesa Scenic and Historic Byway - Finding Fish in Abundance

Grand Mesa Scenic and Historic Byway - Finding Fish in Abundance

The original finding aid described this photograph as: Original Caption: Avid anglers will find trout like this in abundance on the Grand Mesa Scenic and Historic Byway. Location: Location: Colorado (39.051° ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,  Fla. -- The abundance of water and marshes surrounding Launch Pad 39A becomes apparent from the vantage point of the Vehicle Assembly Building roof as the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The abundance of water and marshes surr...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The abundance of water and marshes surrounding Launch Pad 39A becomes apparent from the vantage point of the Vehicle Assembly Building roof as the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts of... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on Runway 15 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the STS-91 mission. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, as is apparent from the abundance of native vegetation and water surrounding the landing strip. Main gear touchdown was at 2:00:18 p.m. EDT on June 12, 1998, landing on orbit 155 of the mission. The wheels stopped at 2:01:22 p.m. EDT, for a total mission-elapsed time of 9 days, 19 hours, 55 minutes and 1 second. The 91st Shuttle mission was the 44th KSC landing in the history of the Space Shuttle program and the 15th consecutive landing at KSC. During the mission, the orbiter docked with the Russian space station Mir for the ninth time, concluding Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. STS-91 also featured first flights for both the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and the Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew included Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin of the Russian Space Agency. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas also returned to Earth from Mir as an STS-91 crew member after 141 days in space KSC-98dc734

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Discovery nears touchdown on Runway 15 of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) to complete the STS-91 mission. The SLF is nestled among the wilds of the Merritt Island ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Satish Krishnan (right) from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory places a Mars microprobe on a workstand. In the background, Chris Voorhees watches. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1628

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Satish Krishnan (right) from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory places a Mars microprobe on a workstand. In the backgr... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), Tandy Bianco, with Lockheed Martin, and Satish Krishnan (foreground) and Chris Voorhees (behind him), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, observe a Mars microprobe on the workstand. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millelnnium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1629

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), Tandy Bianco, with Lockheed Martin, and Satish Krishnan (foreground) and Chris Voorhees (behind him), from the Jet... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander is prepared to receive a number of microprobes being added to the spacecraft. Scheduled to be launched on Jan. 3, 1999, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1625

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), the Mars Polar Lander is prepared to receive a number of microprobes being added to the spacecraft. Scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees and Satish Krishnan from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove a microprobe which will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1627

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees and Satish Krishnan from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove a microprobe which will hitchhike on... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1626

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), the two Mars microprobes are shown mounted on opposite sides of the Mars Polar Lander. The two microprobes and the lander are scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1648

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), the two Mars microprobes are shown mounted on opposite sides of the Mars Polar Lander. The two microprobes and th... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), JPL workers mount a Mars microprobe onto the Mars Polar Lander. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1645

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), JPL workers mount a Mars microprobe onto the Mars Polar Lander. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the lander, sch... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), a JPL worker carries a Mars microprobe to the Mars Polar Lander at left. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1646

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), a JPL worker carries a Mars microprobe to the Mars Polar Lander at left. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the la... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees (front) watches while Satish Krishnan (back) places a Mars microprobe on a workstand. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1642

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees (front) watches while Satish Krishnan (back) places a Mars microprobe on a workstand. Two micropro... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), a JPL worker checks the Mars microprobe. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1643

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), a JPL worker checks the Mars microprobe. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1641

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars mic... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), two JPL workers measure a Mars microprobe. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1644

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), two JPL workers measure a Mars microprobe. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to ... more

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), JPL workers prepare to mount a Mars microprobe onto the Mars Polar Lander. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars KSC-98pc1647

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsula...

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF-2), JPL workers prepare to mount a Mars microprobe onto the Mars Polar Lander. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the ... more

Hematite Abundance on Martian Surface

Hematite Abundance on Martian Surface

Hematite Abundance on Martian Surface NASA/JPL/ASU

Abundance of Very Large Impact Craters on Mathilde

Abundance of Very Large Impact Craters on Mathilde

Abundance of Very Large Impact Craters on Mathilde NASA/JPL/JHUAPL

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>comes to rest on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. Workers check the spacecraft’s position. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0102

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter <...

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>comes to rest on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. Workers check the spacecraft’s position. The Mars Od... more

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</a> is safely placed on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0103

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</...

The <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter</a> is safely placed on a workstand in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science in... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check the movement of the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> as it is carried to the workstand at right. The circular object facing forward on the spacecraft is a high-gain antenna. On the right side is the rectangular solar array assembly. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0100

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers check the movement of the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> as it is carried to the workstand at right. The ... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>as it is lowered to a workstand. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0101

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href=http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/>2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>as it is lowered to a workstand. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter carr... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> to a workstand (left). The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0099

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a> to a workstand (left). The spacecraft carries three science... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>is lifted from a platform by an overhead crane while workers help guide it. The Odyssey is being moved to a workstand in the SAEF-2. The spacecraft carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0098

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a hr...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the 2001 <a href="http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/">Mars Odyssey Orbiter </a>is lifted from a platform by an overhead crane while workers help guide it. The... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers oversee removal of the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0121

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers overse...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers oversee removal of the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of th... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter is moved toward a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0123

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar arra...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter is moved toward a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and al... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a close look at the back side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0160

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 take a close look at the back side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science inst... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter onto a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0124

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help g...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers help guide the solar array from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter onto a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraf... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a visual check of the front side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0159

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 make a visual check of the front side of the opened solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The Mars Odyssey carries three science i... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help guide the solar array just removed from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter toward a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0122

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help gu...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 help guide the solar array just removed from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter toward a nearby workstand. This will give workers access to other compon... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach an overhead crane to the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to move the component to a workstand. This will give workers access to other components of the spacecraft and allow inspection of the array. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0120

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach...

In the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2, workers attach an overhead crane to the solar array on the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter to move the component to a workstand. This will give workers access t... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open the solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, allowing inspection of the panels and giving them access to other components. The Mars Odyssey carries three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment as related to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0158

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open th...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly & Encapsulation Facility -2 open the solar array panels from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, allowing inspection of the panels and giving them access to other components. The M... more

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter pose in front of the spacecraft in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0195

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectr...

Two technicians involved with the installation of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter pose in front of the spacecraft in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; ... more

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II) .; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0188

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is in...

Technicians check out the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II) .; The orbiter will carry three scien... more

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0192

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be ins...

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS)into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).The orbiter will carry three science ins... more

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0193

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be i...

Technicians guide The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers attach a crane to the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); to move it into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter.; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0190

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers attach a crane to the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS); to move it into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter.; The orbiter will... more

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0194

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Ma...

The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is installed by technicians on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the ... more

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0191

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to...

An overhead crane moves The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) into place to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2).; The orbiter will carry three sc... more

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is moved to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II).; The orbiter will carry three science instruments: the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. [The GRS is a rebuild of the instrument lost with the Mars Observer mission.] The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0189

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is move...

Technicians examine the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) before it is moved to be installed on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility II (SAEF II).; The orbiter will carry th... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0264

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 adjust the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0258

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morpholog... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help put the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) in its place on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0262

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers help put the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) in its place on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of ... more

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0259

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility ...

At a work bench in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, workers test the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralo... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead crane lifts and moves the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) toward the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0260

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead c...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, an overhead crane lifts and moves the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) toward the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and m... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers check the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter (background). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0257

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), workers check the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) before attaching to the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter (background). THEMIS will map the m... more

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0263

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check ...

Workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 check the placement of the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on the Mars Odyssey Orbiter. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of ... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), left, is moved toward the Mars Odyssey Orbiter, at right. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0261

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF 2), the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), left, is moved toward the Mars Odyssey Orbiter, at right. THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morph... more

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) attach logos to the Mars Odyssey solar panels, which are undergoing illumination testing. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0366

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2...

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) attach logos to the Mars Odyssey solar panels, which are undergoing illumination testing. The orbiter will carry three science ins... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter sits on a workstand (left) while workers at right prepare its solar arrays for illumination testing. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0371

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), the ...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter sits on a workstand (left) while workers at right prepare its solar arrays for illumination testing. The orbiter w... more

Workers attach reflective panels to the Mars Odyssey solar arrays for illumination testing. The Mars Orbiter is at left on a workstand. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0369

Workers attach reflective panels to the Mars Odyssey solar arrays for ...

Workers attach reflective panels to the Mars Odyssey solar arrays for illumination testing. The Mars Orbiter is at left on a workstand. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Sp... more

A worker (left) records data during illumination testing on the Mars Odyssey solar arrays he stands behind. The 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0370

A worker (left) records data during illumination testing on the Mars O...

A worker (left) records data during illumination testing on the Mars Odyssey solar arrays he stands behind. The 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer... more

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) set up the Mars Odyssey solar panels for illumination testing. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0365

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2...

Workers in the in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2) set up the Mars Odyssey solar panels for illumination testing. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma... more

Workers set up illumination testing for the Mars Odyssey solar panels. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0367

Workers set up illumination testing for the Mars Odyssey solar panels....

Workers set up illumination testing for the Mars Odyssey solar panels. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), workers at right attach reflective panels to the Mars Odyssey solar arrays during illumination testing. The Mars Orbiter is at left on a workstand. The orbiter will carry three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0368

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), workers at right attach reflective panels to the Mars Odyssey solar arrays during illumination testing. The Mars Orbiter is at left on a worksta... more

Two Russian scientists look over the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), after its removal from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEND was built by Russia’s Space Research Institute (IKI). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The orbiter will carry two other science instruments: THEMIS and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0414

Two Russian scientists look over the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEN...

Two Russian scientists look over the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), after its removal from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEND was built by Russia’s Space Re... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), workers prepare to remove the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEND was built by Russia’s Space Research Institute (IKI). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The orbiter will carry two other science instruments: THEMIS and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0411

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), work...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), workers prepare to remove the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), a worker removes the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEND was built by Russia’s Space Research Institute (IKI). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The orbiter will carry two other science instruments: THEMIS and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0412

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), a wo...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2 (SAEF-2), a worker removes the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEN... more

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, a Russian scientist (SAEF-2) looks over the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), after its removal from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter. The HEND was built by Russia’s Space Research Institute (IKI). The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The orbiter will carry two other science instruments: THEMIS and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta 7925 rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0413

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, a Russian sci...

In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility 2, a Russian scientist (SAEF-2) looks over the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND), part of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), after its removal from the 20... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is in vertical position in the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0463

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is in vertical position in th...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is in vertical position in the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch Apr... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is eased into a vertical position to be lifted up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0462

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is eased into a vertical posi...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is eased into a vertical position to be lifted up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, s... more

On Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers maneuver the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket into a vertical position . The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0461

On Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers maneuver...

On Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers maneuver the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket into a vertical position . The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for laun... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0455

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, C...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey conta... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted vertically up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0464

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted vertically up the g...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted vertically up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April ... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0457

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, C...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket arrives on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey conta... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket suspended in the the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is reflected in the pool nearby. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0465

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket suspended in the the gantry o...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket suspended in the the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is reflected in the pool nearby. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, s... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket backs into position to be lifted for erection on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0456

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket backs into position to be lif...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket backs into position to be lifted for erection on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for la... more

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lift the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket to a vertical position. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0458

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Stat...

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lift the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket to a vertical position. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled fo... more

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted into place in the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0460

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted into place in the g...

The first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket is lifted into place in the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April ... more

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lift the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket to a vertical position. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled for launch April 7, 2001. Mars Odyssey contains three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0459

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Stat...

Cranes on the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lift the first stage of a Boeing Delta rocket to a vertical position. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, scheduled fo... more

A third solid rocket booster is lifted up the gantry between two others on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated with a Delta 7925 rocket for launch April 7, 2001. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, containing three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0420

A third solid rocket booster is lifted up the gantry between two other...

A third solid rocket booster is lifted up the gantry between two others on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated with a Delta 7925 rocket for launch April 7, 2001. The rocket wil... more

A crane lifts a solid rocket booster on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with a Delta 7925 rocket for launch April 7, 2001. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, containing three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0418

A crane lifts a solid rocket booster on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canavera...

A crane lifts a solid rocket booster on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with a Delta 7925 rocket for launch April 7, 2001. The rocket will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey ... more

Two solid rocket boosters, in the background, are lifted up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for stacking with a Delta 7925 rocket. The rocket, scheduled to launch April 7, 2001, will carry the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter, containing three science instruments: THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE). THEMIS will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface using a high-resolution camera and a thermal infrared imaging spectrometer. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. The MARIE will characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers KSC01pp0417

Two solid rocket boosters, in the background, are lifted up the gantry...

Two solid rocket boosters, in the background, are lifted up the gantry on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for stacking with a Delta 7925 rocket. The rocket, scheduled to launch April 7, 2001... more