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Moonrise moon shimoga, science technology.

Moonrise moon shimoga, science technology.

Three hundred sixty world circle, travel vacation.

Three hundred sixty world circle, travel vacation.

Person woman naked, people.

Person woman naked, people.

Lego aircraft space travel.

Lego aircraft space travel.

Dome observatory circle, places monuments.

Dome observatory circle, places monuments.

Cake christmas fruit, food drink.

Cake christmas fruit, food drink.

Houses apartments windows, architecture buildings.

Houses apartments windows, architecture buildings.

Mountains universe night sky.

Mountains universe night sky.

Solar eruption fire, science technology.

Solar eruption fire, science technology.

Moon space travel space.

Moon space travel space.

Universe from BL Royal 19 C I, f. 34v

Universe from BL Royal 19 C I, f. 34v

Universe from BL Royal 19 C I, f. 34v

Universe from BL Royal 19 C I, f. 34v

Mahavira Sitting at the Top of the Universe: Folio from a Kalpasutra Manuscript

Mahavira Sitting at the Top of the Universe: Folio from a Kalpasutra Manuscript

Universe from BL Royal 19 A IX, f. 149

Universe from BL Royal 19 A IX, f. 149

[Medieval universe, with heaven above, bands containing stars, and earth below]

[Medieval universe, with heaven above, bands containing stars, and earth below]

[Earth-centered universe, with orbits of moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the firmament in concentric circles]

[Earth-centered universe, with orbits of moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the firmament in concentric circles]

[An illustration of the Ptolemaic concept of the universe showing the earth in the center]

[An illustration of the Ptolemaic concept of the universe showing the earth in the center]

Jupiter, Neptune and Pluto dividing the universe

Jupiter, Neptune and Pluto dividing the universe

[Title page of De revolutionibus orbium coelstium, with statement that the sun, and not the earth, is the center of our universe]

[Title page of De revolutionibus orbium coelstium, with statement that the sun, and not the earth, is the center of our universe]

[Atlas, dressed like an ancient king, holding earth centered universe on his shoulders]

[Atlas, dressed like an ancient king, holding earth centered universe on his shoulders]

[Illustration showing Descartes' mechanical view of a universe filled with plenum and a system of vortexes that carries planets around the sun]

[Illustration showing Descartes' mechanical view of a universe filled with plenum and a system of vortexes that carries planets around the sun]

The figure of the World.

The figure of the World.

[Three maps of the cosmological systems of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Brahe].

[Three maps of the cosmological systems of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Brahe].

Planisphere celeste septentrional ; Planisphere celeste meridional /

Planisphere celeste septentrional ; Planisphere celeste meridional  /

Planisphaerivm Aratevm sive Compages Orbivm Mvndanorvm ex hypothesi Aratea in plano expressa.

Planisphaerivm Aratevm sive Compages Orbivm Mvndanorvm ex hypothesi Aratea in plano expressa.

La sphere artificielle ou armilaire oblique : elevée sur l'horizon a la latitude de Paris /

La sphere artificielle ou armilaire oblique : elevée sur l'horizon a la latitude de Paris  /

[Collection of nine images including astronomical instruments, celestial charts, and a world map].

[Collection of nine images including astronomical instruments, celestial charts, and a world map].

Planisphaerium coeleste : secundum restitutionem Hevelianam et Hallejanam /

Planisphaerium coeleste : secundum restitutionem Hevelianam et Hallejanam /

In Provincial congress, New-York, June 2, 1775. Friends and countrymen. The parent of the universe, hath divided this earth amongst the children of men, and drawn out the line of their habitation ... To the inhabitants of the province of Quebec.

In Provincial congress, New-York, June 2, 1775. Friends and countrymen. The parent of the universe, hath divided this earth amongst the children of men, and drawn out the line of their habitation ... To the inhabitants of the province of Quebec.

Kujang chʻŏnsang yŏlchʻa punya chido.

Kujang chʻŏnsang yŏlchʻa punya chido.

Introduction a la géographie: carte des diverses positions de la sphere, des systhèmes de l'Univers, des planettes, des eclypses &. /

Introduction a la géographie: carte des diverses positions de la sphere, des systhèmes de l'Univers, des planettes, des eclypses &. /

Door dit hemels pleyn wert vertoondt den gehelen loop des hemels der vaste sterren met haer beeltenisse /

Door dit hemels pleyn wert vertoondt den gehelen loop des hemels der vaste sterren met haer beeltenisse /

The Bombardment of All the Thrones of Europe and the Fall of the Tyrants for the Happiness of the Universe (Bombardement de Tous les Trônes de l'Europe et la Chûte des Tyrans pour la Bonheur de l'Univers)

The Bombardment of All the Thrones of Europe and the Fall of the Tyrants for the Happiness of the Universe (Bombardement de Tous les Trônes de l'Europe et la Chûte des Tyrans pour la Bonheur de l'Univers)

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

flora from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

flora from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

Portunus from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

Portunus from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

portrait from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

map from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

fauna from "The Voyages and Travels of Capt. Cook, Mungo Park, La Perouse, and others; ... with a ... geographical description of the World. Embellished with ... engravings and maps. (The World or the present state of the Universe. ... Vol. II.)"

A celestial planisphere, or map of the heavens /

A celestial planisphere, or map of the heavens /

Der gestirnte Himmel : südliche Halbkugel /

Der gestirnte Himmel : südliche Halbkugel /

Der gestirnte Himmel : nördliche Halbkugel /

Der gestirnte Himmel : nördliche Halbkugel /

Planisphaerium coeleste.

Planisphaerium coeleste.

Ipotesi relativa alla sviluppata origine del Creato Sulla Teoria Fluidale Elettro-Magnetiga : con il nuovo planisferio celeste che da a conoscere in ogni istante I passaggi di ogni costellazione boreale ed Australe per Tutti I meridiani del mondo /

Ipotesi relativa alla sviluppata origine del Creato Sulla Teoria Fluidale Elettro-Magnetiga : con il nuovo planisferio celeste che da a conoscere in ogni istante I passaggi di ogni costellazione boreale ed Australe per Tutti I meridiani del mondo /

The universe after Cosmas, [A.D.] 550.

The universe after Cosmas, [A.D.] 550.

Glory to the grand architect of the universe. The W. Lodge of St. John No. 2, regularly constituted under the auspices of the Grand Orient of Malta, to all Freemasons over the globe, greeting, strength & union ... In witness whereof, done and de

Glory to the grand architect of the universe. The W. Lodge of St. John No. 2, regularly constituted under the auspices of the Grand Orient of Malta, to all Freemasons over the globe, greeting, strength & union ... In witness whereof, done and de

King Teebaw's palace at Mandalay, the centre of the universe.

King Teebaw's palace at Mandalay, the centre of the universe.

The Universe Is Created

The Universe Is Created

The Universe Is Created

The Universe Is Created

The Universe is Created (L'Univers est créé), from Fragrance (Noa Noa)

The Universe is Created (L'Univers est créé), from Fragrance (Noa Noa)

Atlas Joe; or, the fearful responsibilities of a self-appointed manager of the universe / F. Opper.

Atlas Joe; or, the fearful responsibilities of a self-appointed manager of the universe / F. Opper.

The most important thing in the universe / L.M. Glackens.

The most important thing in the universe / L.M. Glackens.

Stars of the first 5 magnitudes visible in Northern latitudes /

Stars of the first 5 magnitudes visible in Northern latitudes /

Stars of the first 5 magnitudes visible in Northern latitudes /

Stars of the first 5 magnitudes visible in Northern latitudes /

Thurston, world's famous magician the wonder show of the universe.

Thurston, world's famous magician the wonder show of the universe.

Thurston the great magician the wonder show of the universe.

Thurston the great magician the wonder show of the universe.

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues II

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues II

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues I

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues I

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues III

Statues and sculpture. Four mothers of the universe statues III

["Miss Universe" and a bevy of other beauties]

["Miss Universe" and a bevy of other beauties]

Betty Boop - Be Human (1936)

Betty Boop - Be Human (1936)

Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light with the ultraviolet camera

Earth, photographed in far-ultraviolet light with the ultraviolet camera

Cresent Earth rises above lunar horizon

Cresent Earth rises above lunar horizon

Crescent Earth eclipsed by silhouetted horizon of the moon

Crescent Earth eclipsed by silhouetted horizon of the moon

Alternate high tech Mayan universe : note

Alternate high tech Mayan universe : note

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program. n/a

This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program. n/a

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Hangar AO at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, payload processing technicians begin prelaunch checkout work of NASA’s X-Ray Timing Explorer XTE as it rests on a payload support structure after its arrival from the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Launch Complex 17 at the Cape on a Delta II rocket on Aug. 31, 1995. After launch, the XTE will gather data on X-ray sources in our galaxy and the universe. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-95PC-1195

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Hangar AO at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, payload processing technicians begin prelaunch checkout work of NASA’s X-Ray Timing Explorer XTE as it rests on a payload support structure after its arrival from the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Launch Complex 17 at the Cape on a Delta II rocket on Aug. 31, 1995. After launch, the XTE will gather data on X-ray sources in our galaxy and the universe. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-95PC-1195

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious "dark matter" that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc587

Under the supervision of Boeing technicians, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), a payload slated to fly on STS-91, is undergoing a final weight and balance check on the Launch Package Integration Stand in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). Next, it will be placed in the Payload Canister and transported to Launch Complex 39A where it will be installed into Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay. Weighing in at approximately three tons, the AMS is a major particle physics experiment that will look for cosmic antimatter originating from outside our galaxy. The data it gathers could also give clues about the mysterious "dark matter" that may make up 90 percent or more of the universe. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, and the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc587

A SPACEHAB Single Module (top) and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment are secure in Discovery's payload bay shortly before the payload bay doors are closed for the flight of STS-91 at Launch Pad 39A. Launch is planned for June 2 with a window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The single SPACEHAB module houses experiments to be performed by the astronauts and serves as a cargo carrier for items to be transferred to and from the Russian Space Station Mir. The AMS experiment is the first of a new generation of space-based experiments which will use particles, instead of light, to study the Universe and will search for both antimatter and "dark matter," as well as measure normal matter cosmic and gamma rays. STS-91 will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc637

A SPACEHAB Single Module (top) and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment are secure in Discovery's payload bay shortly before the payload bay doors are closed for the flight of STS-91 at Launch Pad 39A. Launch is planned for June 2 with a window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The single SPACEHAB module houses experiments to be performed by the astronauts and serves as a cargo carrier for items to be transferred to and from the Russian Space Station Mir. The AMS experiment is the first of a new generation of space-based experiments which will use particles, instead of light, to study the Universe and will search for both antimatter and "dark matter," as well as measure normal matter cosmic and gamma rays. STS-91 will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc637

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment and four Get Away Special (GAS) payload canisters are secure in Discovery's payload bay shortly before the payload bay doors are closed for the flight of STS-91 at Launch Pad 39A. Launch is planned for June 2 with a window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The AMS experiment is the first of a new generation of space-based experiments which will use particles, instead of light, to study the Universe and will search for both antimatter and "dark matter," as well as measure normal matter cosmic and gamma rays. The GAS Program, initiated to provide extremely low-cost access to space, is managed by the Shuttle Small Payloads Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Eight GAS experiments will be conducted on STS-91. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc639

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment and four Get Away Special (GAS) payload canisters are secure in Discovery's payload bay shortly before the payload bay doors are closed for the flight of STS-91 at Launch Pad 39A. Launch is planned for June 2 with a window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The AMS experiment is the first of a new generation of space-based experiments which will use particles, instead of light, to study the Universe and will search for both antimatter and "dark matter," as well as measure normal matter cosmic and gamma rays. The GAS Program, initiated to provide extremely low-cost access to space, is managed by the Shuttle Small Payloads Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Eight GAS experiments will be conducted on STS-91. The mission will also feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew includes Commander Charles Precourt; Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; Janet Kavandi, Ph.D.; and Valery Ryumin, with the Russian Space Agency. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc639

STS093-S-001 (September 1998) --- This is the STS-93 mission insignia designed by the crew members. Space shuttle Columbia will carry the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) into low Earth orbit initiating its planned five-year astronomy mission. AXAF is the third of NASA's great observatories, following the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). AXAF will provide scientists and order-of magnitude improvement over current capabilities at X-ray wavelengths. In the words of the crew, "Observations of X-ray emissions from energetic galaxies and clusters, as well as black holes, promise to greatly expand current understanding of the origin and evolution of our universe." The patch depicts AXAF separating from the space shuttle Columbia after a successful deployment. A spiral galaxy is shown in the background as a possible target for AXAF observations. The two flags represent the international crew, consisting of astronauts from both the United States and France. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA sts093-s-001

STS093-S-001 (September 1998) --- This is the STS-93 mission insignia designed by the crew members. Space shuttle Columbia will carry the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) into low Earth orbit initiating its planned five-year astronomy mission. AXAF is the third of NASA's great observatories, following the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). AXAF will provide scientists and order-of magnitude improvement over current capabilities at X-ray wavelengths. In the words of the crew, "Observations of X-ray emissions from energetic galaxies and clusters, as well as black holes, promise to greatly expand current understanding of the origin and evolution of our universe." The patch depicts AXAF separating from the space shuttle Columbia after a successful deployment. A spiral galaxy is shown in the background as a possible target for AXAF observations. The two flags represent the international crew, consisting of astronauts from both the United States and France.    The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA sts093-s-001

During the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out the flight deck on the orbiter Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1688

During the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out the flight deck on the orbiter Columbia, in the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1688

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, aboard the orbiter Columbia, STS-93 Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins listens to Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The rest of the crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1693

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, aboard the orbiter Columbia, STS-93 Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins listens to Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The rest of the crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1693

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out her seat in the orbiter Columbia. Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1689

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins checks out her seat in the orbiter Columbia. Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1689

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (left) and Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins (right) check equipment that will fly on mission STS-93. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. The other STS-93 crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1687

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (left) and Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins (right) check equipment that will fly on mission STS-93. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. The other STS-93 crew members are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1687

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman checks equipment that will fly on mission STS-93. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1690

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman checks equipment that will fly on mission STS-93. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1690

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, crew members pose for a photograph . From left they are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Above Ashby's head is Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman. Not shown is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley. Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1692

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, crew members pose for a photograph . From left they are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Above Ashby's head is Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman. Not shown is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley. Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander on a shuttle flight. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1692

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley checks out equipment in the orbiter Columbia. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1691

In the Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3, during the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) for mission STS-93, Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley checks out equipment in the orbiter Columbia. The CEIT provides an opportunity for crew members to check equipment and facilities that will be aboard the orbiter during their mission. The STS-93 mission will deploy the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), which comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the telescope, and the science instrument module (SIM). AXAF will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of a variety of high-energy objects to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The other STS-93 crew members are Mission Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France. Targeted date for the launch of STS-93 is March 18, 1999 KSC-98pc1691

The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's newest space telescope, is seen above at the unveiling ceremony at TRW Space and Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif. The photo was taken by Marshall Space Flight Center and appears on its <a href="http://www.msfc.nasa.gov/news">Marshall News Center Web site</a>, along with other digital images of the completely assembled observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, the CXO is the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Scientists believe its ability to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds give the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-chandra-xo2

The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's newest space telescope, is seen above at the unveiling ceremony at TRW Space and Electronics Group in Redondo Beach, Calif. The photo was taken by Marshall Space Flight Center and appears on its <a href="http://www.msfc.nasa.gov/news">Marshall News Center Web site</a>, along with other digital images of the completely assembled observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, the CXO is the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Scientists believe its ability to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds give the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-chandra-xo2

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (right) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0163

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (right) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0163

Cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, the Chandra X-ray Observatory reaches the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). Chandra arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0165

Cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, the Chandra X-ray Observatory reaches the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). Chandra arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0165

Cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, the Chandra X-ray Observatory waits to be moved inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). Chandra arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0166

Cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, the Chandra X-ray Observatory waits to be moved inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF). Chandra arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0166

At the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers (left) drive, by remote control, the rear bogie away from the VPF. The bogie is part of the tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System that helped move the Chandra X-ray Observatory (right) from the Shuttle Landing Facility into the VPF. Chandra arrived at KSC on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0167

At the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers (left) drive, by remote control, the rear bogie away from the VPF. The bogie is part of the tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System that helped move the Chandra X-ray Observatory (right) from the Shuttle Landing Facility into the VPF. Chandra arrived at KSC on Thursday, Feb. 4, aboard an Air Force C-5 Galaxy aircraft. In the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0167

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (left) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0164

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chandra X-ray Observatory is unloaded from an Air Force C-5 Galaxy transporter two days after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility on Feb. 4. The observatory sits cradled in the cargo hold of a tractor-trailer rig called the Space Cargo Transportation System, which closely resembles the size and shape of the Shuttle cargo bay. In the background (left) is the mate-demate device, used when an orbiter is returned to KSC on the back of a Shuttle carrier aircraft. Over the next few months, Chandra will undergo final tests and be mated to a Boeing-provided Inertial Upper Stage for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0164

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers check fittings and cables on the stand that will raise the Chandra X-ray Observatory to a vertical position. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0175

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers check fittings and cables on the stand that will raise the Chandra X-ray Observatory to a vertical position. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0175

Inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), the overhead crane lifts Chandra X-ray Observatory completely out of its protective container. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0172

Inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), the overhead crane lifts Chandra X-ray Observatory completely out of its protective container. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0172

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers check the placement of the Chandra X-ray Observatory on the stand on the floor. The stand will be used to raise the observatory to a vertical position. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0174

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers check the placement of the Chandra X-ray Observatory on the stand on the floor. The stand will be used to raise the observatory to a vertical position. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0174

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers begin moving the overhead crane carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory from its protective container to a stand on the floor. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0173

In the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers begin moving the overhead crane carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory from its protective container to a stand on the floor. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0173

Inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers attach the overhead cable to the Chandra X-ray Observatory to lift it out of its protective container. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0169

Inside the Vertical Processing Facility (VPF), workers attach the overhead cable to the Chandra X-ray Observatory to lift it out of its protective container. While in the VPF, the telescope will undergo final installation of associated electronic components; it will also be tested, fueled and mated with the Inertial Upper Stage booster. A set of integrated tests will follow. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe KSC-99pc0169