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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, technicians in NASA’s AO Building on Cape Canaveral Air Station move the Wind spacecraft to a work stand. Wind is scheduled for launch on a Delta II expendable launch vehicle. Wind is the first of two missions of the Global Geospace Science Initiative, part of the worldwide collaboration for the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics ISTP program. It will carry six U.S. instruments, one French instrument and the first Russian instrument to ever fly on an American satellite, as part of an effort to measure properties of the solar wind before it reaches Earth. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-94PC-1147

U.S. Air Force personnel with the 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, prepare pallets of sacks of wheat flour in preparation for loading onto a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft which will fly into Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina on a relief mission. The three-year-old relief effort has been able to resume their relief missions after a five month hold due to aircraft receiving ground fire over Sarajevo. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents.PHOTO by TECH. SGT. Bruce Sherwood

U.S. Air Force personnel with the 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, prepare pallets of sacks of wheat flour in preparation for loading onto a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft which will fly into Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina on a relief mission. The three-year-old relief effort has been able to resume their mission after a five month hold due to aircraft receiving ground fire over Sarajevo. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents

A U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft from the 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, lands to be reloaded with more relief supplies to be flown to Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. The three-year-old relief effort has been able to resume their mission after a five month hold due to aircraft receiving ground fire over Sarajevo. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents

A U.S. Air Force forklift driver with the 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, moves pallets of sacks of wheat flour in preparation for loading onto a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft which will fly into Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina on a relief mission. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents. For recreation, the personnel have set up a basketball hoop

U.S. Air Force SENIOR AIRMAN Woodruff, 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, places sacks of wheat flour on a pallet in preparation for loading onto a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules which will fly the flour into Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina on a relief mission. The three-year-old relief effort has been able to resume their mission after a five month hold due to aircraft receiving ground fire over Sarajevo. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents

A U.S. Air Force forklift driver moves pallets of sacks of wheat flour in preparation for loading onto a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules aircraft which will fly into Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina on a relief mission. The three-year-old relief effort has been able to resume their relief mission after a five month hold due to aircraft receiving ground fire over Sarajevo. The C-130 crews fly two missions a day into the Sarajevo airport dropping off approximately 30 metric tons of wheat flour to the besieged residents. The personnel are attached to the 37th Airlift Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. The U.S. Laboratory module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0297

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC-00pp0298

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The floor of the Space Station Processing Facility is filled with racks and hardware for testing the various components of the International Space Station (ISS). The large module in the center of the floor (top) is the U.S. Lab, Destiny. Expected to be a major feature in future research, Destiny will provide facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research. It is scheduled to be launched on mission STS-98 (no date determined yet for launch). At top left are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined KSC00pp0298

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Station Processing Facility is filled with hardware, components for the International Space Station. Lined up (left to right) are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined. KSC-00pp0292

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Space Station Processing Facility is filled with hardware, components for the International Space Station. Lined up (left to right) are the Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules Raffaello and Leonardo and the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3). Italy's major contributions to the ISS program, Raffaello and Leonardo are reusable logistics carriers to resupply and return station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. They are slated as payloads on missions STS-102 and STS-100, respectively. Dates have not yet been determined for the two missions. The PMA-3, once launched, will be mated to Node 1, a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of the Space Station. The primary purpose of PMA-3 is to serve as a Shuttle docking port through which crew members and equipment will transfer to the Space Station during later assembly missions. PMA-3 is scheduled as payload on mission STS-92, whose date for launch is not yet determined. KSC00pp0292

Mural in town, depicting the chapel of San Elizario, founded in 1789, which is often mistaken for a Spanish mission, since it lies quite near two missions in nearby El Paso, Texas

Small grotto outside the chapel of San Elizario, founded in 1789, is often mistaken for a Spanish mission, since it lies quite near two missions in nearby El Paso, Texas

Religious figure at the chapel of San Elizario, founded in 1789, is often mistaken for a Spanish mission, since it lies quite near two missions in nearby El Paso, Texas

The chapel of San Elizario, founded in 1789, is often mistaken for a Spanish mission, since it lies quite near two missions in nearby El Paso, Texas

3490a: At Chkalovsky Airfield in Star City, Russia on the outskirts of Moscow, Expedition 41 Commander Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) is greeted by his daughters Nov. 10, just hours after he, NASA Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst landed in Kazakhstan in their Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft to complete a 165-day mission on the International Space Station. Suraev completed his second flight in space and has now logged 334 days in space on his two missions. NASA/Stephanie Stoll jsc2014e092491