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map from "Två Månader i Egypten. Anteckningar ... Med 2 Kartar, 16 träsnitt, etc"

Bridges. Highway bridge across an arm of Norris Lake which has been developed by the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority), with local cooperation, for recreational uses. Note that, as on all TVA bridges where view is of importance, the parapet consists of a solid portion and an open rail to permit good view

Bridges. Highway bridge near Soddy, Tennessee, where, in cooperation with work relief agencies and the governing body of the county, TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) developed an arm of Chickamauga Lake for recreational uses

Norris Dam and powerhouse. Night view of Norris Dam with floodlighting. The more spectacular dams of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) are equipped to be floodlit at night and are popular excursion points. Pinpoint lights along top of dam are small lenses in back of the handrail bracket road lighting fixtures. Wet spots on dam are the result of small shrinkage cracks during initial years which later sealed themselves by the sediment contained in the water

General planning. In bringing down its overall planning program to actual cases, the Authority works in intimate contact with local political institutions, and county, city, and state planning agencies, most of which owe their existence to TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) instigation. Models, designs, surveys, drafts of ordinances and legislation are developed by TVA technicians to assist in the physical replanning of the valley

Chickamauga Dam and powerhouse. One of the headquarters buildings of farmers' cooperatives which distribute TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) power. With comfortable lounges, meeting rooms, and up-to-snuff shops, garages and offices, such buildings become centers of interest in the small towns in which they are located (quoted from previously written caption). Headquarters building of the rural power distribution cooperative at Shelbyville, Tennessee (see general comments under K 2382). In the design of these structures a certain degree of uniformity is observed to express the fact that they are parts of a nationwide system. The symbol REA stands for Rural Electrification Administration which by engineering, financing, and general guidance promotes rural electrical cooperatives throughout the United States and its territories. Each design is individually developed, however, from the special requirements of the organization and with attention to location and site characteristics

One of the groups of tourists' cabins at Cove Lake State Park. The general appearance of the structures, as others built by the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority), is more or less traditional because it was thought that too great a deviation in this remote area would prevent ready popular acceptance of the main principles of the demonstration

Refreshments concession inside the Norris visitors' building (compare with notes on K 1867). In the design of such facilities the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) wanted to demonstrate simple, clean, efficient arrangements which at the time were not known or appreciated in the valley

Miscellaneous design. In the course of its construction programs, the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) has occasion to design and construct many different types of buildings, always with an earnest effort to set examples which are within the ability of local residents or organizations to follow. This school at Fontana, erected for the children of TVA employees, is operated in collaboration with the North Carolina State Department of Education and a large portion of it will remain in permanent use,

Wheeler dam and powerhouse. Visitors' reception room in Wheeler control building. Windows on three sides and overlook terrace adjoining offer complete view of plant and surroundings. Fourth wall used for description of TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) program. Floor: gray-brown terrazo, divided into large squares by white metal strips. Wainscot, window sills, trim around doorway and curb at footlights brownish-red precast terrazo. Walls burlap covered, painted subdued tan. Windows aluminum. Ceiling and upper part of walls, plaster painted warm gray with warm off-white reflecting circles and cove across end (ceiling acoustic plaster). Lighting indirect. Lights in cove across end of room also throw downward, directed by lenses toward wall display and shielded by aluminum louvers. Behind curb inclined contol lens footlights and louver (aluminum) shielding air exhaust. Supply through ceiling grilles which border ceiling on two sides. Deep trim around doorway intended as shield while passing footlights. Display in gray, black and tan, keyed with general color scheme. Guard's desk of natural oak and ebomized birch, with raised ledge for visitor's registration

This interesting combination of gauge house and navigation lightpole with service ladders and handrails developed into decorative features is typical of TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) navigation projects all up and down the river

Agriculture being still the predominant occupation in the Valley, the TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) programs included a demonstration of good agricultural practices. The barn shown here was built in the course of such programs and served the double purpose of demonstration and the provision of pasteurized milk for construction employees

Recreational structures. Big Ridge Lake. Diving tower, beach and bath house may be seen in the background. This forty-five acre body of water has proved an attractive recreation spot for thousands of visitors since it was first opened to the public in May 1934. Encircled by the 3,500 acres of wooded hills in Big Ridge Park, the resort is provided with a boathouse, bath house, a public lodge, nineteen modern vacation cabins and a beach with a specially constructed pool for children. Located on the eastern boundary of Norris reservoir about twenty-five miles northeast of Knoxville, Tennessee, the lake was formed by constuction of a small dam across one of the arms of the reservoir. This recreation area and the 3,800 acre Noris Park near Norris Dam were developed by the National Park Service and the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) in cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). This is one of many comparable parks on TVA reservoirs, most of which are in use and greatly enjoyed by tourists as well as residents of the surrounding area who previously had few, if any, outdoor opportunites for ourtdoor sport and recreation. The completion of other recreational parks has been prevented by the war

General planning. In the reception room of Norris powerhouse the guide explains to a group of visitors the functioning of the project and will follow up by an explanation of the relation of the particular dam to the integrated system and to the general program of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority). See also comments relating to K 1132

One of the TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) switchyards near Memphis, Tennessee. While such installations tend to be clearcut and orderly in the nature of their layouts, the TVA also puts particular stress on the minor buildings which occur in conjuction with them, as demonstations of architectural design generally applicable to smaller structures

Bridges. Bridge on Norris freeway which was built by TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) as construction road, and later turned over to the state as part of the highway system. The bridge is of reinforced concrete and is cantilevered on the land side of the foundations to meet the highway fill. Note, also, comments on K 4203

Demountable employee housing. Three-bedroom war workers' house constructed in five slices. On this project, where the houses went into an existing community in Alabama to provide housing for employees of chemical and metallurgical industries of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority), the local desire for traditional appearance was accommodated by the use of a pitched roof. Each side of the roof is hinged at the eaves and is laid down, during transport, over the ceiling to bring overall height within normal highway clearances

Employee housing. One of the house types at the construction village at Wheeler, Alabama. Most early house types of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) were more or less in harmony with local traditional building design to minimize avoiding conflict with strongly held prejudices, but improvements in detail and a closer approach to thoroughly modern concepts were sought for and attained on each subsequent project

Recreational structures. Another view of concession building near Chickamauga Dam (compare with K 2411). Grading and planting unfinished. Boat harbors are built by TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) on well-sheltered lake arms close to centers of population. Concession buildings serve as supply headquarters and also accommodate large numbers of visitors who come to watch fun

Norris Dam and powerhouse. View of reception room at the TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) first project which was experimental and somewhat small compared to visitors' traffic in peacetime. Guard sits behind special desk with raised rim, used by visitors when they register. Large window behind guard looks out over switchyard and over route taken by visitors upon completion of their inspection trip

Cove Lake Park was built under TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) direction by the Tennessee State Department of Conservation with the assistance of the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) on an arm of Norris Lake. It was initiated as a demonstration of standards appropriate to valley conditions

Cove Lake Park was built under TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) direction by the Tennessee State Department of Conservation with the assistance of the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) on an arm of Norris Lake. It was initiated as a demonstration of standards appropriate to valley conditions

Recreational structures. Boat harbor at Norris, with parking spaces in foreground. Harbor was obtained practically without added expense by application of design to the quarrying operations which furnished the concrete aggregate for the dam. This view, which shows only a portion of the parking space, indicates the tremendous popularity enjoyed by TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) resorts, all the parking spaces being jammed full on summer holidays

Visitors' buildings. Because the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) system is owned by the public, visitors are encouraged to inspect the projects, and do so in large numbers. Many of them arrive after traveling long distances; therefore, restrooms and refreshment concessions are provided. The photograph shows such facilities at south end of Pickwick Landing Dam, divided between twin buildings which straddle the earthfill portion of the dam. The buildings front on an overlook terrace which connects with broad stairs to the lock operating deck below

Norris Dam and powerhouse. Night view of Norris Dam with floodlighting. The more spectacular dams of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) are equipped to be floodlit at night and are popular excursion points. Pinpoint lights along top of dam are small lenses in back of the handrail bracket road lighting fixtures. Wet spots on dam are the result of small shrinkage cracks during initial years which later sealed themselves by the sediment contained in the water

General planning. Refrigerated barge designed and built by the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) in collaboration with the University of Tennessee to encourage the fruit and vegetable freezing industry in the Valley and the marketing of its products over the inland waterways system. The architects of the Authority cooperated in the design of the superstructure which was erected on a standard steel barge. Sheathing is of T and G boards, roof of galvanized sheet metal. Glass-enclosed cabin at one end houses refrigerating machinery, at other end crew's quarters. Colors are light shades of grey, with upper and lower bands of superstructure in maroon. Visible part of windows is the screen frame; glazed sash is behind and its frame is painted black to eliminate its competetion with the screen frame and its...

Recreational structures. Development of difficult topography at the ramp leading to one of TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) boat harbors on Norris Lake. Semi-concealed structure is public comfort station

Pickwick Dam. Reception room of a powerhouse which is somewhat difficult to reach (therefore, supplementary visitors' facilities were developed at the opposite end of the dam in separate buildings). Rest rooms, elevators, stairway, overlook balcony, and control room can be viewed either through glass doors from this room or from large plate glass openings of the overlook balcony. Terrazzo floor and base, burlap covered plaster walls, acoustic plaster ceiling. Graphic display is in a shallow wall niche between control room doors; top line shows three functions of projects in cross-sectional perspectives; photographs elaborate on TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) program; map of valley is applied to specially constructed movable table

Picnic shelter, more or less typical of many such structures on TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) recreational properties. All were built with CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) or similar work relief assistance with local materials to minimize cash expense

Guntersville Dam and powerhouse. Closeup view of powerhouse. Note texture of concrete on electrical bay which is typical of most TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) projects. Pattern is produced by alternating directions of grain in adjoining form panels. Rough-sawn lumber is used to make grain more pronounced. Heavy texture conceals color and surface irregularities of concrete and will become particularly valuable as concrete ages. Office floor is above flood level and has continuous glass brick strip

Lodge in Norris Park. This is one of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) outdoor recreational resorts developed by the TVA in cooperation with the National Park Service and the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) of Norris Lake. The lodge contains facilities for dining and dancing and has a beautiful view of the lake from dining terrace. The park is developed in a rustic style native to the surrounding territory principally because the CCC program, which needed such opportunites, could furnish only low-skilled labor and practically no materials but those which could be procured by enrollees from local resources, such as timber and stone

Recreational structures. Another view of concession building near Chickamauga Dam (compare with K 2411). Grading and planting unfinished. Boat harbors are built by TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) on well-sheltered lake arms close to centers of population. Concession buildings serve as supply headquarters and also accommodate large numbers of visitors who come to watch fun

Norris Dam and powerhouse. View of reception room at the TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) first project which was experimental and somewhat small compared to visitors' traffic in peacetime. Guard sits behind special desk with raised rim, used by visitors when they register. Large window behind guard looks out over switchyard and over route taken by visitors upon completion of their inspection trip

The grocery store in the group of buildings shown in K 1870 was likewise designed as an offset to the usual dark and messy crossroads establishment typical of rural areas. While originally established to serve TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) employees, it is now used by residents of the vicinity in general

Pickwick Dam. Downstream view of first two units of powerhouse. Intended for an eventual length of six, it has been extended to four units since photograph was taken. Assembly and repair bay surmounted by offices and reception facilities, in left end. Concrete shows ordinary formwork composed of tongue-and-groove boards, whereas most TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) projects make use of special formwork described in connection with Guntersville powerhouse

This structure is fairly typical of the kind of accomodations provided for the recreation of unmarried TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) construction employees of both sexes. Whenever possible such structures are later converted to fill permanent needs of the region. During the construction of Norris Dam, the structure included a large lounge, a refreshment and lunch space, and auditorium with stage and projection room, capable of accomodating 300, library and reading room, barber and beauty shop, restrooms, administrative office and committee or lecture rooms. The auditorium was converted into a gymnasium. It now serves as a community building for the permanent residents of the town of Norris, a regular restaurant having replaced the refreshment room, while the county art center has been installed in place of the library, and the offices, display room, and storage room of the handicraft cooperative have taken up the space formerly occupied by the barber and beauty shop

One of the groups of tourists' cabins at Cove Lake State Park. The general appearance of the structures, as others built by the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority), is more or less traditional because it was thought that too great a deviation in this remote area would prevent ready popular acceptance of the main principles of the demonstration

Bridges. Another bridge on the Norris freeway, designed as a continuous concrete structure, cantilevered past the abutments. The simplicity of TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) bridges contrasts with considerable detail and ornamentation on the standard types of most state highway departments. Photograph illustrates unspoiled rural character of surroundings which was attained by purchase of broad strips of land either side of road and, further contracts with abutting land owners giving them right to cultivate TVA-owned strip in exchange for prohibiting signboards on their own property

Visitors' overlook building at Kentucky Dam. This structure is in the form of an open shed because the other functions of TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) visitors' buildings being accommodated in the nearby construction village, there was need for shelter only at this point. Since the project is in a hot climate, ample ventilation is promoted by the open front, a balustrade height opening toward the back underneath the display and grilles to ventilate the roof space. Most of the displays are arranged as transparencies, with natural illumination during the day, and with floodlights used as substitutes during the night

General planning. This photograph is included in the series as a vivid document on the impingement of Twentieth Century technology upon the neglected and backward rural scene. The meter on the wall of the rural shack indicates that it now receives its share of electricity from the power carried overland by the huge TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) transmission line. TVA program must resolve the conflict between between modern and ancient ways of life so that individuals, similar to those which are shown in the picture, will be benefited

Incidental features of engineering and other projects are designed with great care for their functional and aesthetic adequacy. The gantry crane shown here is typical of many more or less similar ones on TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) properties

Miscellaneous design. Another school built by the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority), primarily for children of its own employees at Norris, Tennessee, but operated in combination with state authorities and made available to children of county residents. It is used as a model school in the state teachers' training program

Employee housing. To accommodate construction personnel at projects, most of which are at some distance from population centers, the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) built permanent housing where there were reasons to expect such communities to be permanent. Being the single owner of land and of structures, the Authority used such housing projects to demonstrate modern principles of town planning of which other federal housing programs and private enterprise made use subsequently. The photograph shows a scene in the town of Norris, Tennessee, adjacent to Norris Dam

Demountable employee housing.This brand new type of housing accommodation was developed through several intermediate steps and experiments in prefabrication, in answer to the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority's) need for housing for temporary use on construction projects in remote localities. The scheme permits fabrication at a distance from the job (about 600 miles in this instance), thus reducing dependence on overtaxed accommodations at the construction project. After completion of the project, the demountable housing is quickly removed elsewhere. Some of the earlier TVA demountables have been moved three times from project to project. The design shown here is particularly light in weight due to full use of the recently developed stressed-skin system of plywood construction. It is built largely of weatherproof plywood. The large bay across the front greatly enhances the size of the living room. The trailer houses, on the basis of experience to date, are entirely competitive in cost with traditionally constructed housing of the same floor area. On account of being constructed in shops rather than in the field, they are produced with much closer tolerances, considerably better finish, and with equipment designed and constructed with greater detail and superior utilization of space

This photograph shows how the two halves of a trailer house, delivered individually, are assembled by simply rolling them together on previously prepared foundations which consist of a few posts driven into the ground connected by planks upon which the house halves roll by means of small wooden wheels. Each half is light enough to be towed behind a 3/4 ton truck or passenger car. They come fully equipped with all essential furniture and equipment, either built-in or stored inside during transport. They are connected to each other by a few bolts, while the roof sections meet in ridges over which a common cap is laid. The whole operation may take between one and three hours, including connection to previously prepared utilities. The section or halves measure 26' x 7'9," thus permitting highway transportation without special permits. Any number of sections can be combined. Two- and three-bedroom houses. Recreation buildings, bath houses, and even very large barracks, have been constructed by TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) on the same general plans but using more sections

One of the TVA's (Tennessee Valley Authority) switchyards near Memphis, Tennessee. While such installations tend to be clearcut and orderly in the nature of their layouts, the TVA also puts particular stress on the minor buildings which occur in conjuction with them, as demonstations of architectural design generally applicable to smaller structures

Demountable employee housing. Because many construction projects are in remote localities where the need for housing exists only during the construction period, the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) developed over a period of years its own method of prefabrication. Houses, recreation buildings, dormitories, washhouses, etc. have been constructed in three dimensional slices which are transported individually, fully equipped, and are coupled up on the site much like cars of a railroad train. Photograph shows one slice of a cabin, 7 1/2' x 22', in transit

Visitors' buildings. Partial view of interior of one of the twin buildings shown on photographs numbers 1986, 1983. This room serves as the guard station and also as reception room where the features of the project and the progress of the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) are explained to visitors before they are taken on inspection trips

Chickamauga Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Fort Loudon [i.e., Loudoun] Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Mississippi photographs - Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph.

Fort Loudon [i.e., Loudoun] Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Chickamauga Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) powerhouse at Tupelo, Mississippi

Chickamauga Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Chickamauga Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Chickamauga Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

Fort Loudon [i.e., Loudoun] Dam, Tennessee. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

TVA's defender. Lawrence Fly, legal light of the New Deal, photographed in Washington when he returned from his victory in New Orleans circuit court fight with opponents of the TVA. 8/14/35

President discusses power pool, Washington, D.C., Sept. 30. President Roosevelt discussed the question of pooling private and public electric power with private and government power experts at the White House today. After a conference that lasted most of the afternoon Frank R. McNinch, Chairman, Federal Power Commission, and Wendell L. Wilkie, President of Commonwealth and Southern Corporation, emerged from the President's office to state that President Roosevelt had agreed to consider pooling Government hydroelectric projects and private power facilities in the TVA area. The president's decision will not only mean an exchange between the Tennessee Valley Authority and private utilities of the Southeast but touch possibilities for Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and other public works projects. Harris and Ewing, Alexander Sachs, extreme right

Thomas Panter, Chief Eng. of the TVA investigating committee

Ed L. Morellead, Dean of Eng. M.I.T. before TVA Committee

Miscellaneous lot of photographs by Barbara Wright, e.g. University of Virginia, Franconia, New Hampshire, Maine. Mountaineer with electrified shanty. TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) client, Tennessee

Appear before the TVA Investigating Committee. Washington, D.C., May 26. David A. Lilienthal, left. Dr. Harcourt A, Morgan, Chairman of the TVA, in a huddle after appearing before the Joint Congressional Committee investigating the TVA, 52638

Says TVA inadequate for power needs in Tennessee Valley. Washington, D.C., Dec. 7. J.A. Krug, Chief Power Planning Engineer of the TVA, testifying before the Committee Investigating TVA, asserted that within eight y ears, either TVA or private utilities will have to expand power facilities in order to meet power demands in the 40,000 square mile area, and that practical and legal price settlements plans are under way for acquisition of integrated systems in the Tennessee Valley

Gas welding a joint in a line of spiral pipe at the TVA's new Douglas Dam on the French Broad River, Tenn. This dam will be 161 feet high and 1,682 feet long, with a 31,600-acre reservoir area extending 43 miles upstream. With a useful storage capacity of approximately 1,330,000 acre-feet, this reservoir will make possible the addition of nearly 100,000 kw. of continuous power to the TVA system in dry years and almost 170,000 kw. in the average year

Transmission towers in the switchyard of TVA's Chickamauga Dam, near Chattanooga, Tenn.

Tightening a nut on a guide vane operating seromotor in TVA's hydroelectric plant, Watts Bar Dam, Tennessee. Located 530 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River, the dam has an authorized power installation of 90,000 kw., which can be increased to a possible ultimate of 150,000 kw. The reservoir at the dam adds 370,000 acre-feet of water to controlled storage on the Tennessee River system

Construction at Douglas Dam (TVA), Tenn.

Insulators and transmission wires in the switchyard of the TVA's Chickamauga Dam, located near Chattanooga, 471 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River. The [dam] has an authorized power installation of 81,000 kw. The reservoir at the dam adds 377,000 acre-feet of water to controlled storage on the Tenn. River system. The power that passes through this switchyard serves many useful domestic, agricultural and industrial uses.

Construction work at the TVA's Douglas Dam, Tenn.

Early stage of construction work at the TVA's Douglas Dam, Tenn. In the background is a log coffer dam

The countryside near the TVA site of the Douglas Dam, Tenn.

A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used to make elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Ala.

Transmission towers in the switchyard of TVA's Chickamauga Dam, near Chattanooga, Tenn.

A carpenter at the TVA's new Douglas dam on the French Broad River, Tenn. This dam will be 161 feet high and 1,682 feet ong, with a 31,600-acre reservoir area extending 43 miles upstream. With a useful storage capacity of approximately 1,330,000 acre-feet, this reservoir will make possible the addition of nearly 100,000 kw. of continuous power to the TVA system in dry years and almost 170,000 kw. in the average year

Welder at work on Douglas Dam, Tenn. (TVA)

Large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area, Alabama

Switchyard at TVA's Wilson Dam hydroelectric plant, vicinity of Sheffield, Ala., 260 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River

Eight generator units in the generator room of a new addition to TVA's hydroelectric plant at Wilson Dam, Sheffield vicinity, Ala. Located 260 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River, the dam has an authorized power installation of 288,000 kw., which can be increased to a possible ultimate of 444,000 kw. The reservoir at the dam adds 377,000 acre-feet of water to controlled storage on the Tennessee River system

Crane operator at TVA's Douglas Dam, Tennessee

Carpenter at work on Douglas Dam, Tennessee (TVA)

Transmission line towers and high tension lines that carry current generated at TVA's Wilson Dam hydroelectric plant, near Sheffield, Ala.

[Electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area, Alabama]

Switch yard at TVA's Wilson Dam hydroelectric plant, vicinity of Sheffield, Ala., 260 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River

"Big Pete" Ramagos, rigger at work on dam (TVA) Douglas Dam, Tenn.

[Men working on telephone lines, probably near a TVA dam hydroelectric plant]

Early stages of construction work at the TVA's Douglas Dam, Tenn.

Generator works at the winding of a generator stator in a new addition to TVA's hydroelectric plant at Wilson Dam, Sheffield vicinity, Ala. Located 260 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River, the dam has an authorized power installation of 288,000 kw., which can be increased to a possible ultimate of 444,000 kw. The reservoir at the dam adds 377,000 acre-feet of water to controlled storage on the Tennessee River system

Construction at TVA's Douglas Dam, Tenn.

Countryside near the TVA site of the Douglas dam, Tenn.

Truck driver at TVA's Douglas Dam, Tennessee

Construction of Douglas Dam, TVA

Switchyard at TVA's Wilson Dam hydroelectric plant, vicinity of Sheffield, Ala., 260 miles above the mouth of the Tennessee River

Smoke stack of TVA chemical plant where elemental phosphorus is made, vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Alabama

A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area, Alabama

Transmission line towers and high tension lines that carry current generated at TVA's Wilson Dam hydroelectric plant, near Sheffield, Ala.

TVA chemical plant, where elemental phosphorus is made, vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Alabama

Electric phosphate smelting furnace used to make elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Alabama

TVA chemical plant, electric furnace loaded with phosphate, vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Alabama