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Wall Fountain (laver) in the form of a Turret

Turret Laver

Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae: Octagonal Temple with a dome, surmounted by a domed turret, crowned with an eagle

Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae: The upper portion of Trajan's Column, showing arabesque work on the crowning turret

View of an unidentified structure with a turret.

View of an unidentified structure with a turret.

Turret Clock. Dent.

House with a Turret, rue de la Tixéranderie, Paris

House with a Turret, rue de la Tixéranderie, Paris

House with a Turret, rue de la Tixéranderie, Paris

House with a Turret, rue de la Tixéranderie, Paris

Turret top for Whitby, William P. Chapman House, Rye, New York

[View of an unidentified structure with a turret.]

[View of an unidentified structure with a turret.]

[View of an unidentified structure with a turret.]

[View of an unidentified structure with a turret.]

The turret of the Monitor shows fifteen marks where she was hit by rebel shot...

After deck and turret of Monitor Kaatskill. Taken at Charleston Harbor, S. [C.].

After deck and turret of Monitor Kaatskill. Taken at Charleston Harbor, S. [C.].

The turret of the Monitor shows fifteen marks where she was hit by rebel shot...

The turret of the Monitor shows fifteen marks where she was hit by rebel shot...

Tourelle Rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, 22 (House with a Turret, No 22, rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, Paris) (called the Turret of Marat)

After deck and turret of Monitor Kaatskill. Taken at Charleston Harbor, S. [C.].

Model of a section of an armoured turret

Turret engines of Monitor CAMANCHE, San Francisco

Turret Mountain from Lake near the Summit, Dutch Flat and Donner Lake Wagon Road, Placer County

[Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, 1876: "Monitor Turret"]

House with a Turret, rue de la Tixéranderie, Paris

[James River, Va. Deck and turret of U.S.S. Monitor]

U.S.S. Miantonomoh, 10 inch guns and forward turret

U.S.S. New York, forward turret and bridge

U.S.S. Brooklyn, forward turret and bridge

U.S.S. Indian[a]; 13 inch guns, forward turret

Lahore - turret fortifications of railway station

U.S.S. Oregon, breech of 13-inch guns in after turret

U.S.S. Oregon, forward turret and bridge

U.S.S. Oregon, forward from top of after turret

U.S.S. Brooklyn forward turret

U.S.S. Oregon, forward from after turret

U.S.S. Massachusetts, interior of turret

Wreck of the Vizcaya, Battle of Santiago, top of forward turret, 1898

U.S.S. Oregon, Capt. Clark and officers and crew of after 13 inch turret, Battle of Santiago

U.S.S. Oregon, Lieut. Elerle, in charge of 13-inch turret, watching the [Cristobal] Colon, Battle of Santiago

U.S.S. Iowa, view of forward turret and bridge

Side turret and mast of the wrecked Spanish cruiser "Viscaya"

Rear turret of the Spanish cruiser "Viscaya

Rear turret of the Spanish cruiser "Viscaya"

Dome and turret crowned cathedral roof and three of the "volcanic marvels," Leon, Nicaragua, C. A.

"Hercules" Placing Turret on Connecticut

Turret and 14" gun on NEW YORK

Crane Hercules, Placing Turret Number 3, Weight 114 Tons, on 'Florida'

Crane Hercules, Placing Turret Number 3, Weight 114 Tons, on 'Florida'

Turret Foundation, Looking North, Monthly Progress Photo, Yard Labor

Crane Hercules, with Turret Number 2, Weight 220,000 Pounds. U.S.S. New York in Tow Off Ordnance Dock

Crane Hercules, Lifting Turret Number 2, U.S.S. New York, From Shore to Deck, Shown Swinging Clear, Weight 220,000 Pounds

Crane Hercules Placing Turret Number 2, Weight 220,000 Pounds, in Position Aboard U.S.S. New York, Lowering Turret

[Woman working turret lathe in training school, Lincoln Motor Co., Detroit, Mi., during World War I]

U.S.S Arizona, 14-inch Turret Track & Liner Turning Machine, General View

U.S.S Arizona, 14-inch Turret Track & Liner Turning Machine, Method of Supporting Turret while Machining Upper Track Liner

U.S.S Arizona, 14-inch Turret Track & Liner Turning Machine, Method of Supporting Turret while Machining Upper Track Liner

U.S.S Arizona, 14-inch Turret Track & Liner Turning Machine, General View

Airplanes - Instruments - Tachometer Drive. Boring, facing and reaming driven gear hole. Six turret operations. Tillotson Mfg. Co., Toledo, O. (Sub-contract with the Willys-Overland Co.)

Airplanes - Ordnance - Airplanes and parts manufactured for government use. 5-L Hull, top view, showing Peirce Turret Ring, Scarf gun mount and bomb sight. At Naval Aircraft factory, Philadelphia, PA. U.S. Navy Department

Airplanes - Instruments - Tachometer Drive. Boring and tapping housing for driving gear and shaft. Six turret operations and one cross-carriage facing operating. Tillotson Mfg. Co., Toledo, O. (Sub-contract with the Willys-Overland Co.)

Airplanes - Manufacturing Plants - Manufacturing Aircraft Parts for Government. Turret lathes in plant of Wolverine Brass Works, Grand Rapids, Mich

Airplanes - Engines - Manufacture of 80 H. P. LE Rhone engine by Union Switch and Signal Co., Swissvale, PA. Heavy duty turret latches for major parts

["Surprise Valley Farm," Arthur Curtiss James property, Beacon Hill Road, Newport, Rhode Island. Detail of masonry with turret in background]

["Surprise Valley Farm," Arthur Curtiss James property, Beacon Hill Road, Newport, Rhode Island. Archway with turret and weathervane in background]

Jefferson Market Court, southwest corner of Sixth Avenue and...

In North American's modern machine shop, another aircraft part is finished on a huge turret lathe, N[orth] A[merican] Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

Parade of M-4 (General Sherman) and M-3 (General Grant) tanks in training maneuvers, Ft. Knox, Ky. Note the lower design of the M-4, the larger gun in the turret and the two hatches in front of the turret

Parade of M-4 (General Sherman) and M-3 (General Grant) tanks in training maneuvers, Ft. Knox, Ky. Note the lower design of the M-4, the larger gun in the turret and the two hatches in front of the turret

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Ready for installation in Chrysler M-3 tanks, these routh turret castings, which weigh 4,000 pounds each, have just been received at the huge Detroit tank arsenal where 10,000 men are turning out these twenty-eight ton rolling arsenals

Chrysler tank arsenal. This is a milling operation. The four-pound metal piece with the aperture is actually the turret for a 37 mm anti-aircraft gun, part of the equipment for an M-3 tank. Extreme accuracy is required in the milling of these parts, because it is important that they be able to move freely. The gun is designed for straight away shooting, as well as serial shooting. The twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks are made in Detroit, at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Traveling overhead hoists are used throughout the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit, for moving heavy castings from one production operation to another. These workers are removing the rotor casing for a 75 mm gun turret from a machine which grinds the outside rim. The twenty-eight ton "medium" tanks M-3s produced here carry 75 mm field guns and 37 mm anti-aircraft guns as well as several machine guns and other small arms

A standard turret lathe being used for boring operations on seventy-five millimeter pack howitzers at the Erie, Pennsylvania, General Electric plant. A set-up for finish reaming the bore and roughing and finishing the powder chamber is shown with seven tubes in the foreground. These howitzers are being produced largely on machinery formerly used for making streetcar motors

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). This turret casting for an M-3 tank weighs 4,000 pounds. The worker is completing one of the several milling operations necessary to insure perfect fit, for the gun which will fire from behind the turret must have freedom of movement. The tank itself, which might be termed an arsenal on tracks, weighs twenty-eight tons. It is now in mass production at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit

M-4 tanks. M-4's are thoroughly tested before being shipped to the battlefront. The tank shown here, at the Aberdeen, Maryland, proving grounds carries both cannon and machine gun in the revolving turret. This is the welded hull construction

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). This turret casting for an M-3 tank weighs 4,000 pounds. The worker is completing one of the several milling operations necessary to insure perfect fit, for the gun which will fire from behind the turret must have freedom of movement. The tank itself, which might be termed an arsenal on tracks, weighs twenty-eight tons. It is now in mass production at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit

The M-7 is the Army's newest tank destroyer and is really a "killer." Being tested for desert warfare at Iron Mountains, California. It carries both a 105mm Howitzer and a 50 caliber gun. Lieutenant M. Hutchison of Enterprise, Alabama is at the extreme right. Corporal L. Roberts from Graham, Texas is at post behind the Howitzer. Corporal Downing, whose home is Dekalb, Missouri, is in the turret

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). This is a radial drill with index fixtures, for drilling and tapping holes in the 4,000 pound turret casting for the mounting plate of the 37 mm anti-aircraft gun of the Chrysler medium tank, the M-3. These twenty-eight ton steel monsters are being turned out in quantity by 10,000 workers at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Ten thousand skilled workers are turning out twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit. This man is checking the sub-assembly of a cupola to be installed on the top of a gun turret of one of these rolling arsenals

Chrysler tank arsenal. The firepower is inserted into the upper turret of an M-3 tank. These workers are installing an assembled 37 mm. anti-aircraft gun, which will then be protected by armor plate. Although this gun is designed for anti-aircraft use, it may also be used for straightway firing

Chrysler tank arsenal. Close work is done on this milling machine, designed for work on the turret of the 75 mm gun with which M-3 tanks are eqipped. The fittings must be perfect, in order that the gun may have as much play as possible. Four turning, tools and two facing tools are used

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Turret rings for the Chrysler twenty-eight ton medium tanks are flame hardened. This skilled workers is one of the 10,000 producing M-3 tanks at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit

Production. M-4 tanks. Cannon and front turret armored plate are lowered into place on an M-4 tank. Machine guns have already been installed and the General Sherman will be ready for the test track. Designed by the Army Ordnance Department and built under ordnance supervision, the M-4 embodies new advances in design based on battlefront experience. Cast steel construction of the hull expedites production

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Ten thousand skilled workers at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal,in Detroit,turning out twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks. This pair is attaching a hinge plate to the cupola of a gun turret which will be set on one of these rolling arsenals

A New York City manufacturer wishes to locate turret lathe, drill press, and arbor press facilities for the manufacture of a five-inch assembly housing

Bofors forty-millimeter mounts. The machine of bronze rings gears for the production of Bofors forty-millimeter anti-aircraft guns mounts and carriages at a large Midwest rubber factory involves skilled precision operations. Here an expert workman is making the final cut on a vertical turret lathe. When this operation is complete, the bronze ring will be moved to the gear for the concluding operation

Sharpshooter. Smiling from behind the turret of a China Air Task Force bomber is Technical Sergeant Douglas Radney, whose record of one confirmed plane destroyed and three probables qualified him for membership in the China Skeet and Gun Club. Radney was a member of the Tokyo bombers last year and had already earned himself the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Silver Star with a star and the Air Medal

Soldiers inspecting new trackless tank during demonstration at Fort Myer, Virginia. Tank was manufactured by the Trackless Tank Corporation of New York, and submitted to the Ordnance Department, U.S. Army, for inspection. Preliminary tests indicate that the tank may be adaptable for reconnaissance purposes, possibly replacing scout cars. Tank weighs 10 tons. During initial, brief tests at Fort Knox, Kentucky, it made 45 miles an hour across rough country, with a 37 mm gun and two machine guns mounted in its turret; its designer says it can travel 85 mph on level ground. It is powered by a 250 horsepower diesel engine, and carries 1/2-inch armor. Tentative plans of the Army call for a redesign of the superstructure for better arming of the tank

Flyweight calling for four inch capacity semi-automatic turret lathe, internal thread grinder, internal grinder, cylindrical grinder, and lapping and heat treating facilities

Worm shaft which may be made in a tool shop having turret lathe, tool room screw cutting lathe, horizontal milling machine, drill press, and heat treating facilities

Frankford Arsenal. Turning shell parts on a turret lathe

Delivery of the first heavy tanks. This is what happens when a truck gets in the path of Uncle Sam's new fifty-seven-ton giant tank. Running over this piece is as much trouble for the tank as running over a curb in an average automobile. The revolving turret on top of the tank contains a three-inch gun and a thirty-seven-millimeter antiaircraft gun

A Brooklyn machine manufacturing firm is seeking machine shop facilities for the machining of very large quantities of Navy brass forgings. Item: socket. Material: Navy brass, two and one-half inches by six inches. Tolerances: plus .002, minus .000. Machines needed: turret lathes, number three Barton and Oliver, number four Warner Swasey or one and one-half inch Jones Lamson. Forgings and inside drilling tools will be furnished

Antiaircraft gun carriage. A leveling socket for a thirty-seven millimeter antiaircraft gun carriage is machined in a turret lathe. The leveling assembly permits the gun to be kept on an even keel on all types of terrain. War program production scene in one of Pennsylvania's heavy industry plants now converted to the production of vitally needed military equipment. AETNA. Ellwood CIty, Pennsylvania

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. A woman employee operates a turret lathe under close supervision of a skilled machinist in a modern machine shop at the Inglewood, California, plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This plant produces the battle-tested ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

NYA (National Youth Administration) work center, Brooklyn, New York. Turret-lathe workers, Negro and white, who are receiving training in machine shop practice, carrying out an operation on a turret lathe

A skilled machinist on a turret lathe in North America's machine shop tests the accuracy of his work with a micrometer