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Workers in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) assist in removing the protective casing from the Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999. The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc299

The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, awaits processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc300

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved to its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc301

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc304

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc302

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc303

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is lowered into its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc305

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Z1 Integrated Truss Segment (ITS), a major element of the STS-92 mission scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis in January 1999, is moved toward its workstand for processing in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF). The Z-1 truss supports the staged buildup of International Space Station (ISS) on this third scheduled flight for ISS. The Z1 truss allows the temporary installation of the U.S. power module to Node 1. Early in the assembly sequence, the purpose of Z1 is to provide a mounting location for Ku-band and S-band telemetry and extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment. It also provides common berthing mechanism hardcover stowage. In addition, it will assist with the execution of nonpropulsive attitude control. The truss arrived at KSC on Feb. 17 for preflight processing in the SSPF KSC-98pc306

An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved into the center of the Space Station Processing Facility clean room at KSC for transition to the high bay. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc917

An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is moved from the low bay into the high bay at the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the ISS. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc916

An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is lifted from a rotation stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC to be placed on a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc918

Technicians carefully lower an Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) onto a work stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC . The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc921

An Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) is suspended in air after being lifted from a rotation stand in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC in order to be moved to a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc919

Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC prepare to lower an Integrated Equipment Assembly (IEA) onto a work stand. The IEA, a large truss segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is one of four power modules to be used on the International Space Station. The modules contain batteries for the ISS solar panels and power for the life support systems and experiments that will be conducted. This first IEA will fly on the Space Shuttle Endeavour as part of STS-97, scheduled to launch August 5, 1999 KSC-98pc920

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility watch as cables and a crane lift the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM) before mating it to the Z1 integrated truss structure, a component of the International Space Station (ISS). The Z1 truss will be used for the temporary installation of the P6 truss segment to the Unity connecting module. The P6 truss segment contains the solar arrays and batteries which will provide early station power. The truss is scheduled to be launched aboard STS-92 in late 1999 KSC-98pc1659

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility look at the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM) that will be attached to the Z1 integrated truss structure, a component of the International Space Station (ISS). The truss will be used for the temporary installation of the P6 truss segment to the Unity connecting module. The P6 truss segment contains the solar arrays and batteries which will provide early station power. The truss is scheduled to be launched aboard STS-92 in late 1999 KSC-98pc1662

Still suspended by a crane and cables in the Space Station Processing Facility, yet hidden by the top of the Z1 integrated truss structure, the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM) is lowered onto the truss for attachment. Workers at the top of a workstand guide it into place. A component of the International Space Station (ISS), the Z1 truss will be used for the temporary installation of the P6 truss segment to the Unity connecting module. The P6 truss segment contains the solar arrays and batteries which will provide early station power. The truss is scheduled to be launched aboard STS-92 in late 1999 KSC-98pc1661

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility watch the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM) lifted high to move it over to the Z1 integrated truss structure at right. It will be mated to the Z1 truss, a component of the International Space Station (ISS). The Z1 truss will be used for the temporary installation of the P6 truss segment to the Unity connecting module. The P6 truss segment contains the solar arrays and batteries which will provide early station power. The truss is scheduled to be launched aboard STS-92 in late 1999 KSC-98pc1660

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility look at the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM) that will be attached to the Z1 integrated truss structure, a component of the International Space Station (ISS). The Z1 truss will be used for the temporary installation of the P6 truss segment to the Unity connecting module. The P6 truss segment contains the solar arrays and batteries which will provide early station power. The truss is scheduled to be launched aboard STS-92 in late 1999 KSC-98pc1658

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, workers load the S0 truss segment onto a flatbed trailer for its transfer to the Operations and Checkout Bldg. for processing. The truss arrived at the SLF aboard a "Super Guppy" aircraft from Boeing in Huntington, Calif. During processing in the O&C, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0677

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The "Super Guppy" transport aircraft approaches the runway at the KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. On board is the S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field on the ISS. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 truss on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0671

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane removes the cover from the S0 truss segment beneath it. The S0 truss will undergo processing in the O&C during which the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0681

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The S0 truss segment is moved into the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C) for processing. The truss arrived at the SLF aboard a "Super Guppy" aircraft from Boeing in Huntington, Calif. During processing in the O&C, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0679

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), workers (at left) watch over the maneuvering of the overhead crane toward the S0 truss segment below it. The S0 truss will undergo processing in the O&C during which the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0683

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane is centered over the S0 truss segment before lowering. The crane will move it to a workstand in the O&C where it will undergo processing. In the foreground is the protective cover just removed. During the processing, the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0682

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the "Super Guppy" transport aircraft opens to reveal its cargo, a S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0673

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, workers watch as a S0 (S Zero) truss segment built for the International Space Station (ISS) is moved out of the "Super Guppy" aircraft that brought it to KSC from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. At right a cameraman records the exercise. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting ISS, is a 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the Canadian Mobile Transporter will be installed on the S0 truss, followed by power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0675

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane moves the S0 truss segment toward a workstand. The S0 truss will undergo processing in the O&C during which the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0684

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - A transporter (right) is moved into place to remove a S0 (S Zero) truss segment (left) from inside the "Super Guppy" aircraft that brought it to KSC from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0674

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), overhead cranes are fitted around the S0 truss segment to move it onto a flatbed trailer which will transfer it to the Operations and Checkout Bldg. for processing. The truss arrived at the SLF aboard the "Super Guppy" aircraft (in the background) from Boeing in Huntington, Calif. During processing, the Canadian Mobile Transporter will be installed on the S0 truss, followed by power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0676

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the "Super Guppy" transport aircraft touches down on the runway. On board the aircraft is the S0 (S Zero) truss segment, from Boeing in Huntington Beach, Calif. The truss segment, which will become the backbone of the orbiting International Space Station (ISS), is a 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch. It will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. During processing at KSC, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0672

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, workers finish loading the S0 truss segment onto a flatbed trailer for transfer to the Operations and Checkout Bldg. for processing. The truss arrived at the SLF aboard a "Super Guppy" aircraft from Boeing in Huntington, Calif. During processing in the O&C, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0678

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C), an overhead crane moves the S0 truss segment toward a workstand. The S0 truss will undergo processing in the O&C during which the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers and a pair of rate gyroscopes will be installed. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44- by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pp0684

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers begin removing the cover from the S0 truss segment after it was moved inside the Operations and Checkout Bldg. (O&C) for processing. The truss arrived at the SLF aboard a "Super Guppy" aircraft from Boeing in Huntington, Calif. During processing in the O&C, the S0 truss will have installed the Canadian Mobile Transporter, power distribution system modules, a heat pipe radiator for cooling, computers, and a pair of rate gyroscopes. Four Global Positioning System antennas are already installed. A 44by 15-foot structure weighing 30,800 pounds when fully outfitted and ready for launch, the truss will be at the center of the ISS 10-truss, girderlike structure that will ultimately extend the length of a football field. Eventually the S0 truss will be attached to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny," which is scheduled to be added to the ISS in April 2000. Later, other trusses will be attached to the S0 on-orbit. The S0 truss is scheduled to be launched in the first quarter of 2001 on mission STS-108 KSC-99pd0680

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be moved to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, rolls to a stop at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1181

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a "fold-away" nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight KSC-99pp1186

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers attach cranes to the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, to lift the truss to a payload transporter for its transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight KSC-99pp1185

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the top of the Guppy cargo carrier is lifted off the S1 truss (background). Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1192

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A KSC transporter moves the Guppy cargo carrier encasing the S1 truss into the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1191

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is lowered toward workstand number three. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1196

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback is lowered toward the S1 truss below it in order to lift the truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1193

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the newly arrived S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is offloaded from NASA's Super Guppy aircraft. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1183

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, NASA's Super Guppy opens to reveal its cargo, the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1182

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is moved toward workstand number three. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1195

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback lifts the S1 truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001 KSC-99pp1194

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is moved away from the Super Guppy that brought it to KSC from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1184

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is moved away from the Super Guppy that brought it to KSC from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1184
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is moved away from the Super Guppy that brought it to KSC from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique "fold-away" nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building KSC-99pp1184

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (far left) and Joe Tanner (right) check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1720

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (left) and Joe Tanner check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1722

In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (left) and Joe Tanner check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1723

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega checks out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment, while Mission Specialist Joe Tanner looks on. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1721

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega checks out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment, while Mission Specialist Joe Tanner looks on. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1721

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (far left) and Joe Tanner (right) check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1720

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-97 Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega (left) and Joe Tanner check out the mission payload, the P6 integrated truss segment. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The mission includes two spacewalks by Noriega and Tanner to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1722

Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility gather with the crew of mission STS-97, who are holding the symbolic key representing the turnover of the P6 Integrated Truss Structure, part of the payload on their mission. During the ceremony the P6 truss segment was transferred from International Space Station ground operations to the NASA shuttle integration team. Commander Brent Jett (second from right) received the key in the ceremony. Standing with him are (left to right) Mission Specialists Marc Garneau, Joe Tanner and Carlos Noriega, at left; and Pilot Mike Bloomfield, at right. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission involves two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at 10:05 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1664

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility line up on the sides of the payload transport canister as an overhead crane moves the P6 integrated truss segment into position above it. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1689

The P6 integrated truss segment hangs suspended from an overhead crane that is moving it the length of the Space Station Processing Facility toward a payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. At the pad, the Space Station element will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1687

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is placed in the payload transport canister while workers watch its progress. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is lowered into the payload transport canister under the watchful eyes of the worker inside the canister as well as the workers on the sides. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1690

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility line up on the sides of the payload transport canister as an overhead crane moves the P6 integrated truss segment into position above it. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1689

In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane lifts the P6 integrated truss segment from a workstand to place it in the payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1682

In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers attach an overhead crane to lift the P6 integrated truss segment from a workstand and move it to the payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1681

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload transport canister (right) and workers wait for the arrival of the P6 integrated truss segment (left) carried by the overhead crane. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1688

Carried by an overhead crane, the P6 integrated truss segment travels the length of the Space Station Processing Facility toward a payload transport canister that will transfer it to Launch Pad 39B. At the pad, the Space Station element will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1686

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is placed in the payload transport canister while workers watch its progress. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is lowered into the payload transport canister under the watchful eyes of the worker inside the canister as well as the workers on the sides. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1690

In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment travels across the building to a payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. At left is the airlock module, another component of the International Space Station. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1684

In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves the P6 integrated truss segment to a payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1683

As it travels across the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment passes over the two Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules, Leonardo (right) and Raffaello (behind Leonardo). The P6 is being moved to a payload transport canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. There it will be placed in Endeavour’s payload bay for launch on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1685

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload transport canister (right) and workers wait for the arrival of the P6 integrated truss segment (left) carried by the overhead crane. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1688

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is close to the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) at left. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the RSS that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1736

The doors of the payload transport canister are open wide in the payload changeout room on Launch Pad 39B. Revealed is the P6 integrated truss segment, which will fly on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1738

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister waits at the base of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) with the P6 integrated truss segment inside. The canister will be lifted up to the payload changeout room (PCR) where the P6 will be removed for transfer to Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the RSS that supports payload delivery at the pad and subsequent vertical installation in the orbiter payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1730

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (on the left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be able to be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1733

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is close to the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) at left. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the RSS that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1736

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure that supports payload delivery at the pad and subsequent vertical installation in the orbiter payload bay. Attached to the canister are the red umbilical lines that maintain the controlled environment inside. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1732

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister waits at the base of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) with the P6 integrated truss segment inside. The canister will be lifted up to the payload changeout room (PCR) where the P6 will be removed for transfer to Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the RSS that supports payload delivery at the pad and subsequent vertical installation in the orbiter payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1730

Workers in the payload changeout room stand by as the doors open on the payload transport canister. Inside is the P6 integrated truss segment, which will fly on mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1737

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, moves higher toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (at left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and solid rocket boosters showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be able to be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1734

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted higher toward the payload changeout room (PCR) above it. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (at left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1735

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, moves higher toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (at left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and solid rocket boosters showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be able to be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1734

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (on the left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be able to be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1733

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure that supports payload delivery at the pad and subsequent vertical installation in the orbiter payload bay. Attached to the canister are the red umbilical lines that maintain the controlled environment inside. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1732

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted higher toward the payload changeout room (PCR) above it. The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (at left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1735

STS-97 Mission Specialist Marc Garneau points to Endeavour's robotic arm that he will use during a spacewalk on the mission. Members of the STS-97 crew are taking part in a payload walkdown from the payload changeout room at Launch Pad 39B. The payload comprises the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, with solar arrays that will be temporarily installed on the recently delivered Z1 truss, connecting them to the Unity module, and batteries. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1747

STS-97 Mission Specialist Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, points to the Canadian robotic arm he will be working with during spacewalks to install solar arrays. At right is Commander Brent Jett. The arrays are part of the P6 Integrated Truss Segment that will be temporarily installed on the recently delivered Z1 truss, connecting them to the Unity module. Each more than 100 feet long, the arrays will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1751

Members of the STS-97 crew take part in payload walkdown inside the payload changeout room at Launch Pad 39B. In the background is seen some of the batteries being carried to the International Space Station on the mission. What appear to be vertical posts at left are the solar arrays. The batteries and solar arrays are part of the P6 Integrated Truss Segment and will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1746

In the payload changeout room at Launch Pad 39B, STS-97 Commander Brent Jett (left), Mission Specialist Marc Garneau (center) and Pilot Michael Bloomfield (right) pause during a payload walkdown. The payload comprises the P6 Integrated Truss Segment, with solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed on the recently delivered Z1 truss, connecting them to the Unity module. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1748

Gathered at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-97 crew pause for a photo. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Pilot Michael Bloomfield, Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. Behind them can be seen the top of the external tank and solid rocket boosters. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1773

The STS-97 crew members wave for the camera as they gather outside Launch Pad 39B. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Pilot Michael Bloomfield, Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. Behind Tanner can be seen the top of the external tank. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1774

The STS-97 crew members wave for the camera as they gather outside Launch Pad 39B. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Pilot Michael Bloomfield, Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00padig109

Gathered at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-97 crew pause for a photo. Standing left to right are Mission Specialist Carlos Noriega, Pilot Michael Bloomfield, Commander Brent Jett and Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau, who is with the Canadian Space Agency. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00padig110

As dawn breaks on the horizon, Space Shuttle Endeavour is seen standing ready for launch, targeted for 10:06 p.m. EST tonight on mission STS-97 to the International Space Station. The Rotating Service Structure was rolled back just before dawn. On top of the orange external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm and its vent hood, known as the “beanie cap.” The hood is raised to clear the external tank 2.5 minutes before launch. The orbiter carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00pp1777

A rising sun illuminates the coastal waters beyond Space Shuttle Endeavour, poised for launch on Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST on mission STS-97. On the left, extending toward the orbiter, is the orbiter access arm. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00padig113

After rollback of the Rotating Service Structure, Space Shuttle Endeavour is spotlighted against the still-black sky of pre-dawn. At the top of the external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm and its vent hood, known as the “beanie cap.” The hood is raised to clear the external tank 2.5 minutes before launch. Endeavour is targeted for launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST on mission STS-97. In the background, the sky prepares for dawn. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00padig112

After rollback of the Rotating Service Structure (at left), Space Shuttle Endeavour stands ready for launch targeted for 10:06 p.m. EST tonight on mission STS-97 to the International Space Station. The orbiter carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00pp1776

After rollback of the Rotating Service Structure, Space Shuttle Endeavour shines under spotlights. At the top of the external tank is the Gaseous Oxygen Vent Arm and its vent hood, known as the “beanie cap.” The hood is raised to clear the external tank 2.5 minutes before launch. Endeavour is targeted for launch Nov. 30 at about 10:06 p.m. EST on mission STS-97. In the background, the sky prepares for dawn. The mission to the International Space Station carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays and batteries that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00padig111

Against a cloudless blue sky, Space Shuttle Endeavour stands ready for launch after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure, at left. Endeavour is targeted for launch tonight at about 10:06 p.m. EST on mission STS-97 to the International Space Station. The orbiter carries the P6 Integrated Truss Segment containing solar arrays that will be temporarily installed to the Unity connecting module by the Z1 truss, recently delivered to and installed on the Station on mission STS-92. The two solar arrays are each more than 100 feet long. They will capture energy from the sun and convert it to power for the Station. Two spacewalks will be required to install the solar array connections KSC-00pp1775

The Integrated Truss Structure S3 waits on the parking apron of the Shuttle Landing Facility after being offloaded from the Super Guppy aircraft in the background. The truss will be moved to a transporter and taken to the Operations and Checkout Building. The second starboard truss segment of the International Space Station, the S3 truss is scheduled to be added to the Station in April 2003 KSC-00pp1866

The Integrated Truss Structure S3 is offloaded from the Super Guppy aircraft that brought it to KSC from Tulsa, Okla. The S3 is built by The Boeing Co. The truss will be transported to the Operations and Checkout Building. The second starboard truss segment of the International Space Station, the S3 truss is scheduled to be added to the Station in April 2003 KSC-00pp1865